Prince Harry and Meghan Markle “support” boycott of Facebook advertising

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Prince Harry and Meghan Markle support #StopHateForProfit campaign, which calls on big businesses to remove their ad campaigns from Facebook until the social media giant takes action to stop the spread of so-called hate speech, has confirmed the civil rights group NAACP.

The Baltimore-based civil rights organization, which was founded in 1909, went on Twitter this weekend to thank the Duke and Duchess of Sussex “for their leadership”, adding “your commitment to the truth, justice and equality is appreciated ”.

The organization, which represents the National Association for the Promotion of People of Color, tweeted: “We are grateful for the leadership of the Duke and Duchess of Sussex in recognizing the importance of solidarity at this time. Your commitment to truth, justice and equality is appreciated. “

The platform’s shares fell 8.3% to $ 216.08 at the close of Friday – its lowest level in three months – after more than 100 advertisers boycotted the company for its inability to stop content perceived as hate speech and misinformation posted on its platform.

Prince Harry and Meghan Markle (seen in London in March) support the #StopHateForProfit campaign, which calls on big businesses to remove their ad campaigns from Facebook until the social media giant takes action to stop the spread of this called hate speech, The NAACP civil rights group has confirmed.

The Baltimore-based civil rights organization, which was founded in 1909, went on Twitter this weekend to thank the Duke and Duchess of Sussex `` for their leadership, '' adding `` your commitment to truth, justice and equality is appreciated ''.

The Baltimore-based civil rights organization, which was founded in 1909, went on Twitter this weekend to thank the Duke and Duchess of Sussex “for their leadership”, adding “your commitment to the truth, justice and equality is appreciated ”.

Speaking of their involvement, an insider told Town and Country magazine: “While we are developing Archewell, one of the areas the Duke and Duchess of Sussex wanted to address is online hate speech, and we have been working with civil rights groups and racial justice.

“In recent weeks, in particular, this issue has become even more vital and they have worked to encourage global CEOs to stand together with a coalition of civil and racial justice groups such as the NAACP, Color of Change and the Anti -Defamation League, which calls for structural changes in our online world.

FEMAIL contacted representatives of Harry and Meghan for comments. Representatives from Sussex confirmed their position to The Insider.

The platform's shares fell 8.3% to $ 216.08 at the close of Friday - its lowest level in three months - after more than 100 advertisers boycotted the company for its inability to stop hate speech and misinformation posted on its platform. Seen: CEO Mark Zuckerberg

The platform’s shares fell 8.3% to $ 216.08 at the close of Friday – its lowest level in three months – after more than 100 advertisers boycotted the company for its inability to stop hate speech and misinformation posted on its platform. Seen: CEO Mark Zuckerberg

Facebook shares fell $ 56 billion after big companies, including Unilever and Coca-Cola, pulled their ads from social media giant, despite CEO Mark Zuckerberg promising to take action against the speeches of hate and put a warning label on a video from the National Republican Committee (RNC).

This wiped out $ 56 billion from Facebook’s market value and dealt a $ 7.2 billion blow to Zuckerberg’s personal wealth, pushing him from third to fourth place on the Bloomberg Billionaires Index and leaving him with new net worth $ 82.3 billion.

This came after Coca-Cola and Unilever became the last large companies to cut Facebook Facebook advertising on Friday, joining several companies including Dove, Honda and Ben & Jerry’s in a demonstration in support of the #StopHateForProfit campaign.

Coca-Cola has announced a break on all paid advertising on social networks worldwide for at least 30 days to say “there is no place for racism in the world and there is no place for racism on social media “while Unilever, one of the world’s largest advertisers, said it would stop spending money on Facebook for the rest of the year.

Zuckerberg resisted pressure on Friday and announced new content policies for the platform, including tighter restrictions on advertising and labels for “harmful” publications from public figures.

Facebook put a warning label on a video released by the Republican National Committee on `` Left Anarchists '' after CEO Mark Zuckerberg caved in and said the social media giant would ban hate speech on the platform following a boycott of 100 advertisers

Facebook put warning label on video released by National Republican Committee on “Left Anarchists” after CEO Mark Zuckerberg caved in and said social media giant would ban hate speech on the platform forms following boycott of 100 advertisers

GOP appears to be one of the first to face crackdown on “harmful” and “hateful” content after Facebook put a warning label on an RNC video about “left anarchists” on Friday .

The platform has put a warning of “violent or graphic content” on the video entitled “It’s about destroying America” ​​which presents images of police cars on fire alongside extracts of speeches delivered by Patrisse Cullors, co-founder of Black Lives Matter, as well as by democrats Nancy Pelosi, Joe Biden and Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez.

“This video may show violent or graphic content,” said the Facebook warning. “We have covered this video so you can decide if you want to see it. “

Video opens with images of Cullors saying “we are trained Marxists” before continuing to show footage of violent scenes across America amid ongoing civil unrest following the Memorial Day murder of the black man George Floyd by a white cop in Minneapolis.

“The” trained Marxists “are on a violent rampage,” flashes on the screen as the video shows selected scenes of a cop hit by a car, a Los Angeles police cruiser on fire, an overturned statue of ‘Ulysse Grant and St. John’s A church on fire during demonstrations calling for an end to police violence and racism.

It also contains undated and edited images of Democratic rivals.

Zuckerberg said in a Facebook video on Friday that the company would start labeling `` harmful '' content from politicians that remains `` newsworthy. ''

Zuckerberg said in a Facebook video on Friday that the company would start labeling “harmful” content from politicians that remains “newsworthy.”

Companies that joined Facebook ad boycott

  • Unilever
  • Verizon
  • Eddie Bauer
  • Eileen Fisher
  • Ben & Jerry’s
  • Patagonia
  • the north face
  • REI
  • Upwork
  • Rakuten Viber
  • Magnolia Photos
  • Goodbye Silverstein
  • Dove
  • Coca Cola
  • Dockers
  • Levi’s
  • Honda

President Pelosi said, “I don’t even know why there are no uprisings across the country and maybe there will be,” while presidential candidate Biden says “we have a incredible opportunity to fundamentally transform the country. “

“Make sure the police are funded,” said Ocasio-Cortez in a clip followed by Representative Ilhan Omar, who called to “completely dismantle” the Minneapolis Police Department.

The footage, which ends up telling viewers to “vote for Trump,” says the so-called “anarchists” attack police, “tear communities apart” and “destroy America.”

The warning sign comes as the social media giant is criticized for not removing or tagging content deemed hate speech, such as messages from Donald Trump and misinformation about the Black Lives Matter protests.

So far, more than 100 companies have joined the boycott of Facebook, with Coca-Cola announcing Friday that it will join companies like Dove, Unilever and Verizon.

“Coca-Cola will suspend paid advertising on all social media platforms worldwide for at least 30 days,” said James Quincey, CEO and president of Coca-Cola, in a statement, adding that the company would not join not the official boycott.

“We will take this time to reassess our advertising policies to determine if revisions are necessary. We also expect greater accountability and transparency from our social media partners. “

Zuckerberg responded to the boycott in a Facebook Live video on Friday when he announced that the company would start labeling “harmful” content from politicians that remains “newsworthy.”

Although he did not name Trump, the policy comes in response to a campaign asking Facebook to impose tougher restrictions on “misinformation” in the president’s campaign ads and his inflammatory messages.

Twitter has already placed warning labels on some of the President’s tweets he deemed abusive or threatening, and unlike Facebook, Twitter has banned all political campaign ads.

Zuckerberg castigated the decision when Twitter first tagged a Trump tweet, saying that it was not up to social media companies to be the “arbiters of truth” – but Facebook’s CEO seems to have changed his mind. notice after boycott of punitive advertisers.

Coca-Cola has announced a pause on all paid social media ads around the world for at least 30 days saying

Coca-Cola has announced a pause on all paid social media ads around the world for at least 30 days saying “there is no place for racism in the world and there is no place for racism on social media “

North Face was the first to pledge allegiance to civil rights groups last week

Now, several large companies, including ice cream maker Ben & Jerry's, have joined the boycott

North Face was the first to pledge allegiance to civil rights groups last week, and now several big companies, including ice cream maker Ben & Jerry’s, have joined the boycott.

“We will soon start labeling some of the content we are leaving out because it is deemed to be of interest, so that people can know when it is,” Zuckerberg said in the livestream.

“We will allow people to share this content to condemn it, just as we do with other problematic content, because it is an important part of how we discuss what is acceptable in our society – but we let’s add a prompt to tell people that the content they share can violate our policies, ”he continued.

Zuckerberg also announced new policies against hate speech in advertisements, as well as guidelines on voting information.

“We already limit certain types of content in the advertisements we allow in regular publications, but we want to do more to ban the type of divisive and inflammatory language that has been used to sow contention,” said Zuckerberg.

“So today we’re banning a broader category of hate content in ads. Specifically, we are expanding our advertising policy to prohibit allegations that people of race, ethnicity, national origin, religion, caste, orientation Sexual, gender identity or specific immigration status threatens the physical security, health or survival of others. ,’ he said.

“We are also expanding our policies to better protect immigrants, migrants, refugees and asylum seekers from advertisements suggesting that these groups are inferior or expressing contempt, dismissal or disgust against them,” he said. he continued.

This has resulted in a boycott of advertisers that has grown rapidly over the past week, organized by activists demanding that Facebook impose more restrictions on hate speech and disinformation. Honda and Unilver were the last large companies to join the boycott.

However, Zuckerberg did not directly address the boycott in his address. At least some of the boycott organizers have said that Zuckerberg’s new policies are inadequate.

“Zuckerberg’s speech was a lost 11-minute opportunity to commit to change,” tweeted Rashad Robinson, president of Color of Change, organizer of the “Stop Hate For Profit” boycott campaign.

“I hope companies advertising on Facebook were watching – if they want to put their money where their mouths are on racial justice, then it’s time to #StopHateForProfit,” added Robinson.

“Today, Mark Zuckerberg has responded by making small changes that do not adequately address #hate & disinformation,” tweeted Johnathan Greenblatt, president of the Anti-Defamation League, one of the main supporters of the boycott.

Greenblatt said if Facebook were “serious” they would have adopted the detailed list of activists’ demands.

Unilever said Friday it would stop advertising on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter in the United States for the rest of the year, citing “division and hate speech during this polarized election period in the United States” .

The consumer goods company, which owns brands like Dove Soap and Lipton tea, has joined a growing advertising boycott against Facebook as part of the “Stop Hate for Profit” campaign launched by American activists after the death of George Floyd.

The effort called on Facebook, which owns Instagram, to do more to stop content perceived as hate speech, and criticized the company for not doing more to restrict President Donald Trump’s campaign publications and advertisements.

Unilever’s subsidiary Ben & Jerry’s, which has an independent board of directors, had previously announced that it would join the boycott on Facebook earlier this week, which could put pressure on the parent company headquartered in London, which has an annual global advertising budget of nearly $ 8 billion.

Unilever said Friday it will stop advertising on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter in the United States for 2020

Unilever said Friday it will stop advertising on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter in the United States for 2020

“Continuing to advertise on these platforms at this time would not add value to people and society. We will continuously monitor and review our current position if necessary, “said Unilever in a statement.

The company, based in the Netherlands and Britain, joins a series of other companies that stop advertising on online platforms.

Facebook in particular has been the target of a growing movement to siphon advertising dollars in an effort to pressure the social media giant to do more to prevent the sharing of racist and violent content on its platform.

“We have decided that as of the end of the year at least, we will not run brand advertising on the Facebook, Instagram and Twitter platforms in the United States,” said Unilever.

Verizon joined others in the boycott of Facebook on Thursday.

Sarah Personette, vice president of global customer solutions at Twitter, said the company’s mission is to serve the public conversation and to ensure that Twitter is a place where people can connect, search and receive information. authentic and credible, and speak freely and securely. . ‘

She added that Twitter is “respectful of our partners’ decisions and will continue to work and communicate closely with them during this time.”

Shares of Facebook, based in Menlo Park, California, fell about 7% on Friday. San Francisco-based Twitter shares also fell about 7%.

The #StopHateForProfit campaign comes as Facebook faces increasing pressure on its approach without the intervention of disinformation and inflammatory messages, including from Trump.

The social media company made about $ 70 billion a year from the ads, the coalition said in a statement on the ADL website.

The campaign criticized Zuckerberg’s decision not to moderate the president after the CEO again defended his decision not to limit Trump’s often controversial, inflammatory and inaccurate positions.

Twitter’s decision in May to hide one of Trump’s tweets to “glorify violence” highlighted the unrest on Facebook as employees rebelled against Zuckerberg’s refusal to punish the president’s false or inflammatory messages.

Facebook last week said it had removed Trump’s re-election campaign ads that contained a symbol used in Nazi Germany for political prisoners, a move hailed by rights activists.

Activists have called on Facebook to crack down harder on Trump and his campaign as the November election looms.

“It is clear that Facebook and its CEO, Mark Zuckerberg, are no longer just careless, but in fact, complacent in the spread of disinformation, despite the irreversible damage to our democracy,” the NAACP said in a tweet.

The coalition criticized Zuckerberg’s decision late last month to leave a particularly inflammatory Trump post, which said in part: “When the looting begins, the shooting begins.” Twitter hid the same message behind a warning that said the message “incited violence”.

Several Facebook employees organized a “virtual outing” of Zuckerberg’s decision.

The Facebook co-founder then held a conference call with civil rights leaders who condemned him for failing to withdraw the post.

In a later statement, Rashad Robinson of Color of Change, Vanita Gupta of the Leadership Conference and Sherrilyn Ifill of LDF said: [Zuckerberg] has not demonstrated an understanding of historic or modern electoral repression and refuses to acknowledge how Facebook facilitates Trump’s call for violence against protesters. Mark sets a very dangerous precedent for other voices who would say similar harmful things on Facebook.

Full statement by Mark Zuckerberg on new Facebook policies

Three weeks ago, I committed to reviewing our policies before the 2020 election. This work is underway, but today I want to share new policies to connect people with authoritative voting information, repress repression of voters and fight hate speech.

The 2020 elections were already preparing to be stormy – and that was before we all faced the added complexity of voting during a pandemic and protests for racial justice across the country. Meanwhile, Facebook will take extra precautions to help everyone stay safe, stay informed, and ultimately use their voice where it matters most – voting.

Many of the changes we are announcing today come directly from comments from the civil rights community and reflect months of work with our civil rights listeners, led by renowned civil rights and freedoms expert Laura W. Murphy and Megan Cacace, partner of the respected company civil law firm of Relman & Colfax. Facebook is about giving people a voice – especially people who previously didn’t have as much voice or power to share their experiences.

1. Provide authoritative information on voting during the pandemic

Last week, we announced the largest voting information campaign in American history, aimed at helping 4 million people register to vote. As part of this, we are creating a voting information center to share authoritative information on how and when you can vote, including voter registration, mail-in voting and advance voting. In a pandemic where people may be afraid to go to the polls, sharing authoritative information about voting by mail will be particularly important. We will be displaying the voting information center at the top of the Facebook and Instagram apps in the coming months.

In the middle of Covid, we are also focusing on preventing new forms of potential voter suppression. For example, if someone says on polling day that a city has been identified as a Covid hotspot, is it about removing voters or just sharing health information? Due to the difficulty of judging this on a large scale, we adopt a policy of attaching a link to our voting information center for articles that discuss voting, including from politicians. It is not a judgment of whether the messages themselves are accurate, but we do want people to have access to authoritative information anyway.

2. Additional steps to combat the repression of voters

In 2018, we updated our policies to ban all content that misleads people about when and how to vote. We are now tightening these policies to reflect the realities of the 2020 elections.

Since the most dangerous voter crackdowns can be local and take place in the days leading up to the election, we will use our Election Operations Center to quickly respond and remove false allegations regarding voting conditions within 72 hours. preceding polling day. Drawing on our experience in combating Covid’s disinformation, we will work in partnership with state electoral authorities and will support each other to determine the accuracy of the information and potentially harmful elements. We know this will be difficult in practice, as the facts on the ground can be uncertain and we do not want to delete specific information about the challenges people face, but we are building our operation to be able to respond quickly.

We will also ban messages making false statements, claiming that ICE officers check immigration papers at polling stations, which is a tactic used to discourage voting. We will also remove any threat of coordinated interference, such as someone who says, “My friends and I will do our own monitoring of polls to make sure that only the right people are voting,” which can be used to intimidate voters. We will continue to review our voter suppression policies on an ongoing basis as part of our work on voter engagement and racial justice.

3. Creating a higher standard for hate content in ads

This week’s EU study found that Facebook acts faster and removes a higher percentage of hate speech from our services than other major Internet platforms, including YouTube and Twitter. We have invested heavily in artificial intelligence systems and human review teams so that now we can identify almost 90% of the hate speech we suppress before anyone reports it to us. We have also set the standard in our industry by publishing regular transparency reports so that people can hold us accountable for progress. We will continue to invest in this work and commit all the resources necessary to improve our application.

We believe it is in the public interest to allow a wider range of freedom of expression in people’s publications than in paid advertisements. We already limit certain types of content in the advertisements we allow in regular publications, but we want to do more to ban the type of divisive and inflammatory language that has been used to sow contention. Today, we’re banning a broader category of hate content in ads. Specifically, we are expanding our advertising policy to prohibit allegations that people of race, ethnicity, national origin, religious background, caste, orientation Sexual, gender identity or specific immigration status threatens the physical security, health or survival of others. . Nous élargissons également nos politiques pour mieux protéger les immigrants, les migrants, les réfugiés et les demandeurs d’asile contre les publicités suggérant que ces groupes sont inférieurs ou exprimant du mépris, du licenciement ou du dégoût à leur égard.

4. Étiquetage du contenu digne d’intérêt

Une poignée de fois par an, nous laissons du contenu qui autrement violerait nos politiques si la valeur d’intérêt public l’emporte sur le risque de préjudice. Souvent, voir le discours des politiciens est dans l’intérêt public, et de la même manière que les médias rapporteront ce qu’un politicien dit, nous pensons que les gens devraient généralement pouvoir le voir par eux-mêmes sur nos plateformes.

Nous allons bientôt commencer à étiqueter une partie du contenu que nous laissons de côté car il est jugé digne d’intérêt, afin que les gens puissent savoir quand c’est le cas. Nous allons permettre aux gens de partager ce contenu pour le condamner, tout comme nous le faisons avec d’autres contenus problématiques, car c’est une partie importante de la façon dont nous discutons de ce qui est acceptable dans notre société – mais nous ajouterons une invite pour dire aux gens que le contenu qu’ils partagent peut enfreindre nos politiques.

Pour clarifier un point: il n’y a pas d’exemption de pertinence pour le contenu qui incite à la violence ou supprime le vote. Même si un politicien ou un fonctionnaire le dit, si nous déterminons que le contenu peut conduire à la violence ou priver les gens de leur droit de vote, nous retirerons ce contenu. De même, il n’y a aucune exception pour les politiciens dans les politiques que j’annonce ici aujourd’hui.

Dans l’ensemble, les politiques que nous mettons en œuvre aujourd’hui sont conçues pour répondre à la réalité des défis auxquels notre pays est confronté et à la façon dont ils se manifestent dans notre communauté. Je m’engage à faire en sorte que Facebook reste un endroit où les gens peuvent utiliser leur voix pour discuter de questions importantes, car je pense que nous pouvons faire plus de progrès lorsque nous nous entendons. Mais je m’oppose également à la haine ou à tout ce qui incite à la violence ou supprime le vote, et nous nous engageons à supprimer cela, peu importe d’où il vient.

Nous continuons de revoir nos politiques et nous continuerons de travailler avec des experts externes et des organisations de défense des droits civiques pour ajuster notre approche à mesure que de nouveaux risques apparaissent. Je suis optimiste que nous pouvons progresser sur la santé publique et la justice raciale tout en maintenant nos traditions démocratiques autour de la liberté d’expression et de vote. Je m’engage à faire en sorte que Facebook soit une force positive pour ce voyage.

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