Police order examination of evidence against man suspected of spitting on deceased rail worker from Covid-19

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The Crown has been asked to examine the evidence of the death of the railway worker Belly Mujinga in recognition of the public interest, although the case is not reopened, the British transport police said.

Mujinga died in April of a coronavirus, weeks after an incident at London Victoria station, leaving a widower and an 11-year-old daughter.

British transport police (BTP) interviewed a 57-year-old man but said the incident did not result in the death of the worker and decided not to refer the case to the CPS.

In a new statement on Friday, the construction industry said it had invited the CPS to conduct an independent review of the available evidence and to determine if there were other avenues of investigation.

The construction industry said it understood the depth of sentiment over the matter and that there were other questions about how it was decided that there was not enough evidence of a crime to justify a prosecution.

Belly Mujinga (photo) died in April of a coronavirus, weeks after an incident at London Victoria station, leaving a widower and 11-year-old daughter

British Transport Police (BTP) interviewed a 57-year-old man but said the incident did not result in the death of the worker (left) and decided not to refer the matter to the CPS.

British transport police (BTP) interviewed a 57-year-old man but said the incident did not result in the death of the worker (left) and decided not to refer the case to the CPS.

The statement read as follows: “We can assure the public that we have thoroughly examined all of the available evidence and that we have not identified any offenses or conduct that meet the threshold for prosecution. “

This development occurred when the number of people signing a petition launched in favor of Ms. Mujinga exceeded one million.

The petition calls for justice for Ms. Mujinga’s family, whose union, the Transport Salaried Staffs ‘Association (TSSA), has received messages of support from across the UK and from countries like the United States and Germany.

Ms. Mujinga’s husband, Lusamba, thanked those who signed the petition, saying the family was on a “roller coaster of emotions.”

Public reaction to the closing of the case took the family by surprise, he said, adding that they had come amid anger over the murder of George Floyd in the United States.

He said: “On Wednesday, thousands of people demonstrated in London to shout loudly that the lives of black people are important. Black lives count. Belly’s life counted.

“It counted for me, for our daughter, our friends and family, for Belly’s colleagues, and now it counts for thousands of you.

“We were there, united in our anger and sorrow. United in our determination to be heard and in our determination to achieve change. We want justice for Belly.

BTP said it understood the depth of sentiment over Ms. Mujinga's case (photo) and that there were other questions about how it was decided that there was not enough evidence from 'a crime to justify a prosecution.

BTP said it understood the depth of sentiment over Ms. Mujinga’s case (photo) and that there were other questions about how it had been decided that there was not enough evidence from ‘a crime to justify a prosecution.

Angie Doll, General Manager of Southern Railway and Gatwick Express, said, “Our thoughts are with the Belly family to whom we continue to extend our deepest condolences.

“While the British Transport Police investigation has found no signs of spitting, any loss of one of our devoted colleagues on the coronavirus is too much.

“Our absolute goal remains to ensure the safety of all our colleagues and we continue to follow all government health advice to protect them.

“We thank our key workers for their commitment during this incredibly difficult time for our country.”

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