My name is Curtis Farrow and this is “My Story” – Barriere Star Journal

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By Curtis Farrow

My name is Curtis Farrow, I have lived in the Barrière region all my life. I have three brothers and sisters and we live on a farm.

On December 28, 2018, my life changed.

In December 2018, I noticed that I was not feeling well. I told my mom, and she made an appointment with Dr. Roman. After two hours of basketball practice, I went to my meeting. The doctor checked my blood sugar and said I was 20.5 years old (the average blood sugar is between 4 and 7), my mother and I didn’t know what that meant. We went for a blood test, but the doctor said we should go to Kamloops right away and pack a night bag just in case.

Once at the hospital, the nurse diagnosed me with type 1 diabetes. No one in our family has type 1 diabetes, we didn’t know. I waited for a bed for two and a half hours. After a bed finally opened, my doctor told me a bit about type 1 diabetes. We had to stay in the hospital for three days and learn a lot more. It was very overwhelming.

Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease. Something has stopped your pancreas from producing insulin. We all need insulin to combine with the food we eat, to turn it into energy that our bodies can use. A type 1 diabetic must get their insulin from an external source. This is usually in the form of a needle. Most type 1 diabetics take one injection with each meal and another needle with slightly different insulin once or twice a day. In addition, to help control their blood sugar, they have a device called the Blood Glucose Monitor, which they put in a small drop of blood to read their blood sugar about eight times a day.

How does diabetes affect me? Diabetes affects me because of my football and basketball games. I need to check my blood sugar so it doesn’t go down, and I need to eat a healthy snack and make sure I’m not too high, because it is very unhealthy for your body.

Sometimes it’s boring. If I try to understand carbohydrates [carbohydrates] in something [to drink or eat] and I can’t find how many carbohydrates are in them, so I have to wait to eat my dinner or lunch. Other than that, it’s not too bad.

If there was a cure for diabetes, it would be great, because I could start playing my sports again without having to worry about going low or going up, and I could start living a normal life like everyone else. others 12- Age.

Scientists don’t really know what causes type 1 diabetes, they know something has stopped your pancreas from producing insulin, but they’re still trying to identify the cause.

Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease. Something has stopped your pancreas from producing insulin.

We all need insulin to combine with the food we eat, to turn it into energy that our bodies can use.

A type 1 diabetic must get their insulin from an external source. This is usually in the form of a needle. Most type 1 diabetics take one injection with each meal and another needle with slightly different insulin once or twice a day.

In addition, to help control their blood sugar, they have a device called a blood sugar monitor, which they put in a small drop of blood to read their blood sugar about eight times a day.

Type 1 diabetes can run in families. That said, there are a lot of people who get it for no reason. There is nothing you did or did not do to get type 1 diabetes. It is not your fault. It has nothing to do with diet or exercise.

Who are JDRF?

JDRF is a world leader in transforming type 1 diabetes into “type none”. They have been around for over 40 years. Their main mission is to find a cure for diabetes, they also contribute to treatment and community advocacy.

In our area, we usually have many events planned to help raise funds for JDRF. Due to COVID-19, most of our events have been canceled. But as a result, this year we are organizing a new event called JDRF House ParT1D for a Cure, presented by Omnipod. This is an exciting online event that will take place on Sunday June 14.

Anyone can connect and we have a great celebrity guest list that includes George Canyon, Max Domi, the youth ambassador who is me, Curtis Farrow, and many others.

To register and learn more, visit: www.jdrfparty.ca

If you wish to donate to JDRF, my family has a team and we are doing a 10 km hike. If you would like to donate to our team, please go online to www.jdrfparty.cadonate and donate to: Team: Farrow Family.

Here are the top five things you should know about type 1 diabetes

• Type 1 is an autoimmune disease. Something attacked our pancreas to stop insulin production

• There is no cure or prevention of type 1, it is only managed by administering insulin every day.

• Type 1 and type 2 diabetes are completely different diseases. So different that they shouldn’t share the same name

• There is no “diabetic diet”. Type 1 diabetics should follow the same healthy diet as everyone else. This includes carbohydrates, protein, healthy fats, vegetables and fruits. The only difference is that people with type 1 diabetes should avoid skipping meals and monitor and count carbohydrates to regulate the amount of insulin they will need.

Anyone at any age can develop type 1 diabetes. Generally, it is diagnosed between the ages of 12 and 14, but it can occur from infancy to middle age.

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From mom:

On December 28, 2018, our lives changed forever, “says Curtis’s mom Angeline Farrow,” that day I took Curtis to the doctor. He was really thirsty and it was rather strange. Then the doctor checked my son’s blood sugar using a glucometer and he showed that Curtis had a blood sugar level of 22. I had an idea what that meant. The doctor told us that we should go to the emergency room in Kamloops and take a night bag. We thought it was all precautionary. Once in Kamloops, the triage nurse told me that Curtis was type 1 diabetic. Right there during triage, I was told that our son had a changed life diagnosis.

Angeline says they spent three very long, informative days at the hospital, where they learned “everything we needed to know about type 1 diabetes.”

“It was very overwhelming and one of the most difficult times in Curtis’ life,” said the mom, noting that “the doctors and nurses at RIH were amazing.”

She notes that Curtis will have it for the rest of his life.

“A type 1 child is so tough and resistant,” added Angeline, “They learn to check their blood sugar up to eight times a day with their fingers. They learn to inject five times a day. There are no days off. It’s every day, every hour. Before eating, you need to count carbohydrates to measure your insulin. Before doing an activity, you should eat to prevent your blood sugar from falling. ”

Mom says some days are horrible! “No matter what you do, your blood sugar is too high or too low. It’s a mental and physical challenge. The other days are easy. ”

The Farrow family says that “Curtis was a rock star”. They say that at first Curtis told all his friends and classmates about it. He educated them. His friends are watching him. His support network is immense and his brothers and sisters are there for him every day. They help him, they give him snacks. They sit with him when he has a soft spot and can no longer play. They wait for him at the dinner table until he has finished counting the carbs and receiving his insulin.

Curtis Farrow is truly a “rock star”!

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