Global death toll from coronavirus exceeds half a million

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On Sunday, the death toll from coronaviruses exceeded half a million while the number of cases worldwide exceeded 10 million narcotics, marking the most devastating and destructive pandemic of a century.

As of Sunday, June 28, the global number of reported deaths was 500,306 at 6 p.m. EST and the global number of infections was reported at 10,070,339, according to figures from Johns Hopkins University in the United States based on data collected from governments around the world.

In the past seven months, more than five million people have recovered from respiratory disease.

The two milestones in the coronavirus crisis come as the United States leads the world with the highest number of COVID-19 cases in the world with more than 2.5 million infections.

Brazil follows with more than 1.3 million cases and Russia with more than 633,000 cases.

Data collected from governments around the world by researchers at Johns Hopkins University in the United States shows that the coronavirus has spread to almost every corner of the globe. Sunday evening, the global death toll exceeded 500,000 dead.

Data from Johns Hopkins University shows that the United States has the highest number of COVID-19 infections with more than 2.5 million cases. Brazil, Russia, India and UK follow behind in highest number of COVID-19 cases

Data from Johns Hopkins University shows that the United States has the highest number of COVID-19 infections with more than 2.5 million cases. Brazil, Russia, India and UK follow behind in highest number of COVID-19 cases

India has the fourth highest number of infections with more than 528,000 reported and the United Kingdom the fifth with more than 312,000 cases.

The United States also leads with the highest number of deaths from COVID-19 with 125,747. About one in four deaths worldwide from COVID-19 – more than 125,000 – have been reported in the United States.

Brazil follows with more than 57,000 reported deaths and the United Kingdom with nearly 44,000 reported deaths.

As the overall death rate has stabilized in recent weeks, health experts are now worried about the record number of new cases in the United States, India and Brazil.

More than 4,700 people die every 24 hours from a COVID-19 disease, according to Reuters calculations based on an average of June 1 to 27. This equates to 196 people per hour, or one person every 18 seconds.

The staggering numbers come as several states in the United States, including Florida, Texas and California, have doubled closings and foreclosure orders after an upsurge in infections when the initial quarantine orders were lifted.

Texas Governor Greg Abbott closed bars and restaurant meals on Friday due to an increase in the number of cases.

“COVID-19 has taken a very fast and very dangerous turn in Texas in the past few weeks,” he said.

Similarly in Florida, beaches will be closed again following a sharp increase in COVID-19 cases. Florida Governor Ron DeSantis blamed the surge in youth interactions.

California Governor Gavin Newsom on Sunday ordered the immediate closure of all bars in seven counties, including Los Angeles, due to the rapid spread of the coronavirus in recent weeks.

However, some states are seeing miraculous numbers and a slowing pandemic, including New York.

United States: EMT staff take a patient to an ambulance in front of Mt. Sinai Morningside Hospital May 18 in New York

United States: EMT staff take a patient to an ambulance in front of Mt. Sinai Morningside Hospital May 18 in New York

Brazil: a COVID-19 patient is treated at Oceanico de Niteroi hospital, Rio de Janeiro on June 22. Brazil has the second largest number of coronavirus cases in the world with more than 1.3 million infections

Brazil: A COVID-19 patient is treated at Oceanico de Niteroi Hospital, Rio de Janeiro on June 22. Brazil has the second largest number of coronavirus cases in the world with more than 1.3 million infections

China: Chinese epidemic worker wears protective coveralls when testing nucleic acid sample for COVID-19 on woman at Xicheng District government test site on June 24

China: Chinese epidemic worker wears protective coveralls when testing nucleic acid for COVID-19 on woman at Xicheng district government test site on June 24

UK: medical worker wearing mask and protective screen, disposable gloves and plastic apron, takes a swap at a coronavirus driving test center in the parking lot of Chessington World of Adventures Resort May, the 1st

UK: medical worker wearing mask and protective screen, disposable gloves and plastic apron, takes a swap at a coronavirus driving test center in the parking lot of Chessington World of Adventures Resort May, the 1st

Governor Andrew Cuomo announced that the state had only reported five coronavirus deaths on Saturday – the lowest since March 15. Only 616 of the nearly 62,000 tests carried out by the state on Saturday resulted in positive diagnoses, a rate of 0.99%, Cuomo added.

During the state’s peak in April, nearly 800 people died every day.

New York still leads the country in deaths from COVID-19, with nearly 25,000 deaths reported.

Sir Jeremy Farrar, a leading scientist who advises politicians in Britain, said that even these global heartbreaking coronavirus numbers are “actually both underestimated”.

The World Health Organization (WHO) has said that the number of COVID-19 cases is more than double the number of severe flu cases the world would see in a normal year.

The WHO announced on Sunday a new daily record for the number of confirmed coronavirus cases worldwide – surpassing 189,000 in a single 24-hour period. The count eclipses the previous record a week earlier with more than 183,000 cases, showing that the number of cases continues to increase worldwide.

COVID-19 first appeared in China in January and has since spread to almost every country on Earth.

Sir Jeremy Farrar, director of the British research organization Wellcome Trust, and a member of the government advisory group SAGE, said in a tweet that the numbers were “disappointing”.

He wrote: “Over 10 million confirmed cases and 500,000 deaths worldwide directly attributed to COVID19 in ~ 6 months. In reality, both underestimate.

“Regions with large populations of [Central and South] America, South Asia, Africa have not yet experienced the full impact of the 1st wave. Accelerate globally.

This dark stage comes as many hard-hit countries, including Britain, Italy and Spain, ease the blockages.

But they must adopt a new standard by doing so, with strict social distancing, working from home and restricted social life in places for months on end.

As much of the western world seems to be recovering from the worst of the pandemic, other, poorer countries are experiencing accelerated outbreaks.

Brazil, Russia and India, which appeared to be spared from disasters at the start of the epidemic, are now all at the mercy of the rapidly spreading virus and have seen cases spiraling out of control in recent weeks.

In Brazil and India, cases tripled in a month.

Brazil, a South American country home to 210 million people, is today experiencing perhaps the worst epidemic in the world after the total number of people who saw COVID-19 increase from 411,821 on May 28 to more of 1.31 million today.

In India, cases have jumped from 158,333 a month ago to 528,859 today, according to the Our World in Data project.

New Delhiā€™s health services are on the verge of being completely overwhelmed by the pandemic and patients with other illnesses are being pushed back, reports The Telegraph.

And in Russia, the number of COVID-19 cases increased from 370,680 in May to 633,542 this week.

The United States remains the most affected nation in the world and there are now 2,539,544 cases and 125,747 deaths, according to Johns Hopkins data.

WHICH COUNTRIES HAVE THE MOST CASE OF CORONAVIRUS?

The true number of people who have been infected with the coronavirus is a mystery because many countries only test people who are seriously ill or have symptoms – many never realize that they are sick or cannot be tested.

Here’s how official records show that the coronavirus has spread around the world:

  1. United States (2,539,544 confirmed cases)
  2. Brazil (1313667)
  3. Russia (633,542)
  4. India (528,859)
  5. United Kingdom (312,640)
  6. Peru (275,989)
  7. Chile (271,982)
  8. Spain (248,469)
  9. Italy (240,136)
  10. Iran (222,669)
  11. Mexico (212802)
  12. Pakistan (202,955)
  13. France (199473)
  14. Turkey (197.239)
  15. Germany (194693)
  16. Saudi Arabia (182,493)
  17. South Africa (138134)
  18. Bangladesh (137,787)
  19. Canada (105146)
  20. Qatar (94,413)

Data from Johns Hopkins University, accessed at 6:00 p.m. June 28.

The US Secretary of Health and Human Services, Alex Azar, warned that “the window is closing” for the United States to take steps to effectively fight coronavirus.

Azar has reported a recent spike in infections, particularly in the south. He says that people must “act responsibly” by taking social distances and wearing face masks, especially “in these hot areas”.

Azar argued that the United States is in a better position than it was two months ago to fight the virus because it performs more tests and has treatments.

But he acknowledged that hospitalizations and deaths could increase in the coming weeks.

Some countries are experiencing a resurgence of infections, leading the authorities to partially restore the blockages, which, according to experts, could be recurrent in the coming months and in 2021.

North America, Latin America and Europe each account for about 25% of cases, while Asia and the Middle East have 11% and 9% respectively, according to Reuters.

The total number of cases continued to increase at a rate of between 1 and 2% per day over the past week, compared with rates above 10% in March.

Countries like China, New Zealand and Australia have experienced new outbreaks in the past month, despite the cancellation of local transmission.

In South Africa, the Minister of Health has warned that the current outbreak of cases in the country is expected to increase rapidly in the coming weeks and push hospitals to the limit. Health Minister Zwelini Mkhize said the current increase in infections is due to people who “have returned to the workplace.”

In Beijing, where hundreds of new cases were linked to an agricultural market, testing capacity was increased to 300,000 per day.

The United States managed to slow the spread of the virus in May, only to see it spread in recent weeks to rural areas and other places that were not previously affected.

In some countries with limited testing capacity, the number of cases reflects a small proportion of the total number of infections. About half of the reported infections are known to have recovered.

MILLION MORE PEOPLE MAY DIE IN THE SECOND WORLD WAVE OF COVID-19, WHICH WARNS

Millions of people around the world could die if there was a second wave of coronavirus infections, the World Health Organization warned on Friday.

Dr Ranieri Guerra, Deputy Director General for Strategic Initiatives at WHO, said the pandemic has spread so far as health officials had expected.

Comparing COVID-19 to the Spanish flu epidemic over 100 years ago, Guerra said that the older pandemic “resumed violently” in September and October – when temperatures were cooler – after a drop.

He told Rai TV in Italy: “The comparison is with the Spanish flu, which behaved exactly like Covid: it decreased in summer and resumed violently in September and October, causing 50 million deaths during the second wave. “

His warning was echoed by the director of the European Central Bank, Christine Lagarde, who said on Friday that “of course, there could be a second severe wave if we learn something about the Spanish flu of 1918-19. “

The Spanish flu epidemic has ravaged many countries around the world, including Britain, where more than 220,000 have been killed and the United States, where 675,000 have died.

The virus first appeared in the spring of 1918, but appears to have mutated when it resurfaced in the fall, resulting in a second, more deadly wave.

It was made worse by the fact that it struck as the First World War came to an end.

“He came back roaring and was much worse,” said epidemiologist Dr. William Hanage of Harvard University T.H. Chan School of Public Health said.

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