Elementary school principal suspended for criticizing lazy teachers during lockout doubles request

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Pauline Wood of Grange Park in Sunderland is under investigation for comments she made on a BBC radio station

Elementary school principal suspended after saying some of her employees “sat at home doing nothing” during the lockout, described some of her teachers as “behaving like petulant children “

Pauline Wood of Grange Park in Sunderland accused her staff of bragging about spending “More time watching Netflix” at home than they did during the coronavirus pandemic because they only came to school two days a week.

Wood, a married mother of three, said she was suspended on full pay on June 12 by the new president of the school governors, Mary Hodgson.

She said Ms. Hodgson told her that action was being taken because she “discredited the school” by commenting on the teachers in an interview with local radio three days earlier.

Speaking exclusively with MailOnline, Ms. Wood, who led the ascent from Grange Park Elementary School to the Ofsted grading system, said that she had been “disappointed” with her suspension and believed that proper procedures had not been followed.

She revealed that she had already given her notice to Grange Park School in Sunderland last January so that she could leave in August, in part because she felt that a “small minority” of employees were not was not his weight.

Ms. Wood was preparing her advice, ready to go in late August, when she was hung over her and prohibited from returning to the school of 220 students without permission.

She said that she and her former chairman of the governors “who had been incredible” gave their advice, in part because they “saw some signals” that they were being undermined by some staff.

Wood said: “We thought one or two of the staff were negligent and I thought, ‘Do I really need it now?

“So we both decided to resign in January so that the school has a very good chance of recruiting the cream of the crop for September. In December, it felt like we had this little group that acted like bubbly kids.

This came as education unions faced charges of sabotaging efforts to bring children back to school, the National Education Union insisting that Boris’ “more than a meter” rule Johnson will still make teaching difficult.

School closings have an overwhelming impact on disadvantaged children, a recent survey found that two million children in the UK had practically no schoolwork at home during the coronavirus shutdown.

About one in five students has done no school work, or less than an hour a day, since the schools were partially closed in March. Meanwhile, only 17% of children spend more than four hours a day on it.

Other figures revealed that almost a third (31%) of private schools taught four or more online courses daily, compared to only 6% of public schools.

Meanwhile, parents left in the dark about the future of their children’s education have to care for them at home, which means they cannot return to work and help restart the family. British economy.

In other developments today:

  • UK has announced 186 more coronavirus deaths as disturbing official data shows average daily death toll increased for the second day in a row
  • Boris Johnson criticized beach goers for “taking too many liberties” and turned crowded beaches into hotbeds as families made their way to the coast to enjoy the last day of the mini-heat wave;
  • Britain’s largest shopping centers, including Lakeside and the Trafford Center, may have to close because their owner Intu has admitted that it will likely have to call in administrators;
  • The risk of dying from coronavirus after being hospitalized has dropped since the peak of the epidemic, according to Oxford University statisticians – from 6% to 1.5%;
  • Police chiefs have warned that a “pressure cooker is forming”, which could escalate into an orgy of violence this summer after the lockdown ends;
  • Men working in factories or as security guards were killed by a coronavirus at more than double the rate of health workers at the height of the crisis in Britain, according to shocking official data;
  • Leading Swedish virus expert said the “world has gone mad” with coronavirus blockages that “go against what is known about managing virus pandemics”.
Ms. Wood has led her school's rapid ascent up the Ofsted grading system from

Wood has led her school’s rapid ascent up the Ofsted grading system from “inadequate” to “exceptional” in 15 years

She criticized some teachers at Grange Park Elementary School (photo) for not weighing their weight during months of confinement

She criticized some teachers at Grange Park Elementary School (photo) for not weighing their weight during months of confinement

Wood (left) under investigation for potentially discrediting her school in an interview with local BBC radio

Wood (left) is under investigation for potentially discrediting her school in an interview with local BBC radio

Although BBC interviewer praised Ms. Wood (far left) for her `` very refreshing '' honesty, school governors suspended her after a complaint that she had `` potentially derogatory comments '' about his staff.

Although BBC interviewer praised Ms. Wood (far left) for “very refreshing” honesty, school governors suspended her after complaint that she had made “potentially derogatory comments” About his staff.

Wood said her problems with a small number of workers continued after the country was blocked and her school was only open to vulnerable students or the children of key workers.

She said that staff were originally supposed to come one day a week each to care for the children who were assisting while those who were protecting did not have to enter at all.

Wood made the decision to ask staff to come two days a week, so they can take care of the students one day and use the second day to contribute to a “learning platform” helping school children. home.

She said she also expected them to spend their second day ringing with parents and kids in their class to check them out and ask if they needed printed worksheets.

But she encountered problems when she tried to ask people to come for three days and suggested that teachers could also use their time to prepare PowerPoint presentations on their performance over the year so that they could have their annual assessments.

She said, “Full-time people have said they don’t want to work three days a week. They said they didn’t mind doing an extra hour or two on the second day, but they didn’t want to come in on the third day.

“I pointed out that they were paid for five days and that it was their job. We had some really bizarre reasons in response. Two of them said, “Well, I know I’m a key worker and my kids can go to the heir of the local school, but I would much prefer that they be home with me, so for childcare reasons, I don’t want to enter. “

“Two others said,” We don’t mind being in front of the kids, but we don’t want to do any chores. ” I said that the tasks asked of them were in the remuneration and conditions of their teachers.

“For example, there are assessments and planning ready for their courses in September, special needs provisions and stuff where you need to enter and get information from the school’s secure server.

“I thought it was a bit of a gift and a good thing to do for the new head. “

But she said “a small group of staff” responded by going into their unions behind her back. Instead of the unions talking to him, they went directly to the human resources department of the local school authority.

Wood praised some teachers for bringing “imaginative things” during the lockout.

She read texts on BBC Radio Newcastle from parents concerned about the level of support that schools have offered to children, and noted: “Some teachers offer the most imaginative and amazing things and others sit at home without doing anything. I will not defend these people.

When asked to comment further, however, she said, “Some teachers have been in (schools), but many have never been. Safety is paramount, but don’t realize that the teachers have all worked hard.

She added, “I think it’s time we talk about the elephant in the room. “

Although the BBC interviewer praised Ms. Wood for her “very refreshing” honesty, school governors suspended her after a complaint that she made “potentially derogatory comments” about her staff.

She responded to criticism, tweeting, `` As principals, our job descriptions say we need to hold staff to account. ''

She responded to the criticism, tweeting, “As principals, our job descriptions say we have to hold the staff to account.”

People went on Twitter to praise Ms. Wood's `` refreshing honesty '' with a posted account: `` Pauline Wood, director of barn park, tells the truth about lazy teachers who do nothing during lockdown and are suspended ''

People went on Twitter to praise Ms. Wood’s “refreshing honesty” with a posted account: “Pauline Wood, the director of barn park, tells the truth about the lazy teachers who do nothing during the lockdown and are suspended “

He was told that this “raised serious concerns about your professional conduct and your judgment … which could discredit the school.” An investigation is underway.

Wood said some teachers would have refused to work on site three days a week – instead of two – citing problems in obtaining care for the children.

After being suspended, she told Schools Week, “It is very concerning that a director can be suspended for giving a truthful response to questions from members of the public. “

Since then, she tweeted, “As principals, our job descriptions indicate that we need to hold staff to account.

People went on Twitter to praise Ms. Wood’s “refreshing honesty” with a posted account: “Pauline Wood, the director of barn park, tells the truth about the lazy teachers who do nothing during the lockdown and are suspended “

Another social media user said, “I think Pauline Wood deserves a pat on the back to be honest. I work with teachers every day and I can guarantee that some of them are really lazy.

“Some have not worked 10 hours a week let alone flat.”

Ms. Wood has been in Grange Park for 15 years and has been repeatedly praised in Ofsted reports for her “relentless” pursuit of “excellence”. She was recognized for overseeing an extremely positive impact on student achievement and saw the school selected for a prestigious TES award in 2012.

The principal said that she did not know who named the school for the award, but was delighted.

She said at the time, “The letter was a fantastic surprise for us, the staff are talking about it absolutely.

“It was enough to be just one of the three exceptional primary schools in Sunderland, but being recognized nationally is even better. When you think about the area we are in, we don’t get everything.

“We have to fight very hard for everything we get, so it’s wonderful.”

Wood also championed breakfast clubs to help working low-income families avoid unemployment.

She had kept the school club price at just £ 1 for nine years until 2014, which greatly boosted the parents.

She told the Sunderland Echo in 2014, “The cost of child care can be a big barrier to work, and the less paid the job, the less likely parents will think it is worth it.”

“Even breakfast clubs can start adding up if parents have more than one child in school and have to use them every day. The cost can then go into a salary and make the parents’ work seem useless.

A Whitehall source said the plans, which will be released next week, will allow Boris Johnson to fulfill his commitment to pick up all the children full time in September. Pictured, students are back in class at Ortu Gable Hall School in Corringham, Essex

A Whitehall source said the plans, which will be released next week, will allow Boris Johnson to fulfill his commitment to pick up all the children full time in September. In the photo, students are back in class at Ortu Gable Hall School in Corringham, Essex

“But it is essential that parents have the opportunity to work and set a good example for their children. And that’s why we haven’t raised the price of our breakfast club in almost a decade.

Grange Park, which is in one of the most deprived areas in the country and has 226 students, is now in the top two percent for phonics and math at the key level level two at the national level.

Grange Park school governor president Mary Hodgson said she could not comment on personal circumstances as this would be a “breach of confidentiality”.

Ms. Wood was working on her notice period and a job offer for her position was closed in March. He offered candidates a salary of between £ 57,986 and £ 67,183 per year for the permanent position, effective September 1.

The ad said, “Grange Park Primary School is looking for a dynamic, ambitious and committed principal to join and lead our successful, friendly and inspiring school in September 2020. Here at Grange Park Primary School, honesty, integrity and ambition are qualities that lie at the heart of everything we do.

“We believe that every child can achieve their potential. We strive to give the children in our school the lifelong learning skills to enable them to choose the life they want. Our enduring message is, “Never give up.”

The General Secretary of the Association of School and College Leaders (ASCL), Geoff Barton, said principals can “give their views and opinions to the public through the media.”

He added that the general advice to workers is that they have three key messages for interviews and that they are helped by someone when they prepare.

Geoff Barton

Dr Mary Bousted

Geoff Barton, secretary general of the Association of School and College Leaders (ASCL), said that Mr. Johnson’s claim was “pure fantasy” and Dr. Mary Bousted, co-secretary general of NEU, said: If the social distance of one meter remains in place, it will still be difficult for schools ”

Social distancing measures while a child studies on a marked table at Kempsey Elementary School in Worcester, May 18, 2020

Social distancing measures while a child studies on a marked table at Kempsey Elementary School in Worcester, May 18, 2020

Secretary of Education Gavin Williamson plans a

Secretary of Education Gavin Williamson plans a “double bubble” for elementary schools, allowing classes of more than 30. Pictured are grade 10 students from Ortu Gable Hall School in Corringham, Essex, returning to school. ‘school

This comes as education unions staged a new conflict with politicians and parents this week over Boris Johnson’s plan for full school attendance in September using reduced social distance.

The Association of School and College Leaders (ASCL) called for a softening of the social distance rule from two meters to one meter to bring children back to school “guesswork” and “pure fantasy”.

Geoff Barton of ASCL said: “There have been many speculations that relaxing the social distance rule from two meters to one meter will allow all children to return to school in September .

“It is pure fantasy. It may be possible to accommodate more students in classrooms with a separation of one meter (more), but not all students. There is simply not enough space in many classrooms to do this.

“It is not a quick fix, nor is the secretary of education’s suggestion on Friday to double the size of the social bubbles to 30, to facilitate a full return to schools. We need an appropriate strategy to bring children back to schools and colleges based on reality and on public health advice.

78% of educational institutions that normally have children in daycare, reception, first or sixth grade were open to at least one of these groups on June 18, according to the DfE

This is an increase from June 11, when more than two in three elementary schools (67%) were opened more widely to students.

As of June 18, 92% of schools were open in some way – the same as the week before, according to statistics from the Department of Education (DfE).

On June 18, some 1,160,000 children attended an educational institution, or 12.2% of students who normally attend school, compared to 9.1% on June 11.

Attendance continues to be highest among Grade 6 students, 34% of all Grade 6 children attending June 18, compared to 26% on June 11.

Attendance was 26% the first year, against a fifth the previous week, and 29% at the reception, against 22% on June 11, according to figures.

Dr Mary Bousted, Joint Secretary General of the NEU, said: “The NEU is of course in favor of the reintegration of all children into school, but even with a rule of one meter which will require more teachers and more places. It is not clear whether in less than three months science will allow classes of 30. If the social distance of one meter remains in place, it will remain difficult for schools.

The proposals being finalized by Gavin Williamson will continue the “bubble” system which has already allowed some primary classes to restart.

Children will not be asked to maintain a distance between them when they are in school under the proposed plans, but they will have to respect social distance during the round trip.

While social distancing must be removed, basic hygiene, such as regular hand washing, will always be encouraged in schools, with children saying “catch, throw, kill” if they sneeze or cough with a handkerchief nearby.

Bubble programs are planned for secondary schools, where the situation is complex, with pupils moving around the school for different subjects.

A Whitehall source said the plans, which will be released next week, will allow Johnson to fulfill his commitment to bring all the children back to school full time for September.

The move will allow ministers to bypass opposition from teachers’ unions, who warned that full return would be impossible due to the need for social distancing.

Alternative proposals to requisition public buildings and bring back an army of retired teachers were abandoned because they were impractical.

The ministers faced a backlash this month when they abandoned their plans to resume all primary classes for a month before the end of the summer term.

School leaders said it was simply not possible to bring everyone back as long as the limit of 15 children was still in effect.

But a source in Whitehall said the drop in virus cases meant Public Health England was ready to dramatically increase indications of the size of bubbles that could be operated on safely.

“We can change the rules of social distance and increase the size of the bubbles,” said the source. “It could be a game-changer for schools.”

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