Covid-19 deaths are down in ALL age groups, England and Wales

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The number of people dying from the coronavirus is now down in almost all age groups for the first time since Britain’s start of the epidemic, official statistics show.

In the week ending June 12, a total of 865 people died Covid-19, which was the lowest weekly number in three months, since March 20.

And it was also the first time that the number of deaths has dropped below 1,000 since the outbreak entered an out of control spiral in the spring.

National Statistics Office shows that weekly coronavirus death registrations did not increase in all age groups in the week to June 12.

It was stagnant in those 25 to 29 years old, among whom there was one death a week for three weeks, but decreased in all other groups.

The most significant decline was among the 1990s, which were the hardest hit by the virus. The most recent data week saw 127 fewer deaths than the week before, and there were 94 fewer victims, reported in people in their late 80s.

Today adds to figures showing that the virus is disappearing in England and Wales, with locking rules should have gone even further today and Prime Minister Boris Johnson said on Sunday that ‘Covid-19 is increasingly under control’.

At least 53,738 people had been killed by the coronavirus by June 12, statistics show, which is 11,000 more than the Ministry of Health counted. In May, the virus killed people at twice the rate of the disease, including dementia.

Data released today shows that the number of people dying with coronavirus appears to have stopped increasing in people of all ages.

It was the first time since the start of the pandemic that had happened, the NSO said in its report.

The most recent statistics, for the week between June 6 and June 12, showed that 1,114 deaths were recorded and then down from 1,588 the week before.

While the number of recorded deaths still remained for some younger age groups, among which there were one or zero deaths, it decreased in all groups over the age of 29, which accounted for all , but one of the deaths (99.9%).

The largest proportional fall was among 65-69 year olds, where the number of deaths fell 46% in one week.

COVID-19 KILLED PEOPLE TWICE THE SICKNESS RATE IN MAY

National Statistics Office shows that the coronavirus was twice as deadly as any other disease in May.

Covid-19 killed around 210.3 people per 100,000 population in the month.

By comparison, dementia accounted for 111.4 per 100,000 deaths – but it was above average (103.3) and may have been affected by undiagnosed coronavirus cases in nursing homes.

Heart disease caused death at a rate of 71.5 per 100,000, down from the average of 98.1.

And strokes (cerebrovascular disease) killed 43.9 people per 100,000 in May, down from the average of 55.4.

Experts have suggested death from other causes may be reduced, either because the same patients caught coronavirus and died with it, or because they put off going to the hospital and their death was delayed .

Death dropped 40 percent from 35 to 39 years of age, 36% among those 50 to 54 years of age and 34% among those aged 55 to 59.

The most significant reduction in numbers was in the 1990s, which are the most affected by the disease. There was a 127-week drop in deaths from them – from 404 to 277.

Today, data also shows that the number of people who die each week has dropped to 12 weeks low.

Looking at the actual dates people died, from another measure where the number of deaths were recorded, there were 865 deaths in the week to June 12.

It was below 1,000 for the first time since March 20 – before lockdown – when 401 people died.

It was the lowest figure in 12 weeks and a 32% drop from 1276 the week before.

The ONS also shows that 48,866 people were killed by the coronavirus in mid-June in England and Wales alone.

Combined with data from the Registers of Scotland and Northern Ireland, Statistics and Research Agency, which puts the UK dead 53,738.

The number is 11,000 more than the 42,647 registered by the Ministry of Health because it includes everyone who has the virus mentioned on their death certificate, regardless of whether they have been tested.

The downside to the ONS number is that it has to be done over a longer period of time, so it’s 10 days late today.

Another pandemic death certificate, excess death, is now at 65,173 across Britain.

It measures the above-average number of deaths for the year to date, and may include people who have not had Covid-19 caught, but have died because they were unable – or not – go to the hospital, for example.

The number of excess deaths recorded in England and Wales in the week ending June 12 was 559, according to the ONS.

Which was the weakest since the week ending March 20.

In the week ending June 12, the number of hospital deaths was below average, the second week in a row there had been no excess mortality in hospitals.

There were still excess deaths recorded in both nursing homes and private homes during this week, although the number was down over the past seven days.

The difficulty in measuring excess mortality is that it is not clear how many of these can be directly attributed to the pandemic coronavirus.

For some patients, the epidemic – and the fact that they have no treatment, may have delayed their death if they died due to an infection caught in the hospital, such as MRSA or pneumonia. .

National Statistics Office shows that the coronavirus was twice as deadly as any other disease in May.

Covid-19 killed around 210.3 people per 100,000 population in the month.

By comparison, dementia accounted for 111.4 per 100,000 deaths – but it was above average (103.3) and may have been affected by undiagnosed coronavirus cases in nursing homes.

Heart disease caused death at a rate of 71.5 per 100,000, down from the average of 98.1.

And strokes (cerebrovascular disease) killed 43.9 people per 100,000 in May, down from the average of 55.4.

Experts have suggested death from other causes may be reduced, either because the same patients caught coronavirus and died with it, or because they put off going to the hospital and their death was delayed .

HOW MANY PEOPLE ARE REALLY DEAD OF CORONAVIRUS?

Ministry of Health: 42,647

Ministry of Health’s latest death toll for all parameters rises to 42,647.

Daily data does not represent how many Covid-19 patients have died in the past 24 hours – it is only the number of deaths that have been reported and recorded with the authorities.

It also only considers patients who tested positive for the virus, as opposed to death suspected of having the coronavirus.

National statistical organizations: 53,738

Data compiled by statistical agencies from each of the United Nations house shows 53,738 people have either died confirmed or suspected Covid-19 across the UK by the end of May.

The actual number of victims will be even higher, because the count only takes into account the deaths which took place until June 14 in Scotland and June 12 in the rest of Great Britain, it is at say up to 10 days from the date.

The National Statistics Office yesterday confirmed that 48,866 people in England and Wales died with confirmed or suspected Covid-Jun 19, 12 cases.

The number of coronavirus deaths was 802 on the same day in Northern Ireland, according to Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency (NISRA).

The National Archives of Scotland – which collects statistics from the northern border – says equal to 4,070 people had died in the country by June 14.

Their reports are always 10 days behind the Ministry of Health (DH) because they wait until as many victims as possible for each day have been counted, to avoid having to revise their statistics.

Excess death: 65,173

The total number of excess deaths has now increased to 65,000.

Excess deaths are considered an accurate measure of the number of people killed by the pandemic because they include a wide range of victims.

As well as including people who may have died with Covid-19 without ever being tested, the data also show how many more people died because their medical treatment was postponed, for example, or who did not or could not go to the hospital when they were seriously ill.

Data from England and Wales shows there is an additional 59,324 deaths between March 20 and June 5, as well as 4,877 in Scotland between March 16 and June 14 and 972 in Ireland from North between March 28 and June 12.

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