Coronavirus KILLED TWICE as many factory workers and security guards as doctors and nurses

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Men working in factories or as security guards were killed by a coronavirus at more than double the rate of health workers at the height of the crisis in Britain, according to shocking official data.

Factory personnel died at a rate of 73 per 100,000 men between March 9 – almost a fortnight before the lockdown – and May 25, followed by men working as bouncers or security (72 per 100,000) .

Figures from the Office of National Statistics released today show that male nurses and doctors – who treated the sickest patients with Covid-19, many without proper protective equipment – died at a rate of 30 for 100,000 men.

The ONS says its data does not prove that these jobs are more dangerous than working in hospitals because the death rate for factory and security workers will also be biased since there are many more health workers as factory and security personnel.

For example, the ONS report found that 130 male health workers died during the two and a half month period, compared with 62 deaths among factory workers.

But factory workers worked throughout the crisis to keep the nation fed during the foreclosure, and are therefore among the most likely to have interacted with others when the disease spread at its fastest rate.

Security guards had to be deployed to supermarkets at the very start of the epidemic to ensure that social distance was respected inside shops and outside queues, exposing them to hundreds people per day.

Data show that the disease also killed male taxi drivers (65), chefs (56.8), smugglers (44.2) and salespeople (34.2) at a rate higher than the national average ( 19.1).

These workers also worked throughout the epidemic or were among the first to be sent back to work when the lockout was lifted in May.

They were up to six times more likely to die from Covid than men in “professional” occupations (11.1 per 100,000). It is largely believed to be because they continue to work at home and avoid contact with others.

Experts said today’s results show that Covid-19 “is largely an occupational disease” and requested that all workers who have regular contact with patients or the public receive personal protective equipment (EAR).

Men working in the so-called “basic professions” were the group most affected at the height of the coronavirus epidemic in Britain. These workers are mainly employed in publicly available jobs and are the least likely to have been able to work from home. While men in “professional” occupations have the lowest mortality rate, it is largely believed that this is because they continue to work from home and avoid contact with others.

Among these workers, those in factories were the most affected, with 73.3 deaths per 100,000 men, followed by security guards (72)

Among these workers, those in factories were the most affected, with 73.3 deaths per 100,000 men, followed by security guards (72)

Data show the disease also killed taxi drivers (65) and bus men (44.2) at a rate up to six times that of men in

Data show the disease also killed taxi drivers (65) and bus men (44.2) at a rate up to six times that of men in “professional” occupations

The ONS report released today covers 4,761 deaths involving Covid-19 in the working age population – those aged 20-64 – in England and Wales recorded between March 9 and 25 may.

There have been more than 54,000 Covid-related deaths in the UK since the start of the pandemic, but the vast majority of them were people over the age of 65.

Almost two-thirds of the 4,761 deaths (3,122) were due to men, which corresponds to the national average. When age was taken into account, men died at a rate of 19.1 per 100,000, compared to 9.7 deaths per 100,000 women (1,639 deaths).

In the social care sector, there were rates of 50.1 deaths per 100,000 men and 19.1 deaths per 100,000 women. For health workers, the death rate was 30.4 for men and 11 for women.

“Elementary” jobs, such as cleaners, binmen, factory workers, shop workers and construction workers, had the highest risk of death for men. Among them, male plant workers were the most affected, dying at a rate of 73 per 100,000 men in between, followed by men working as security (72).

The ONS reports that these occupations have statistically significantly higher proportions of workers of black and Asian ethnicity – who are known to be disproportionately affected by the disease.

Among women, sales and retail assistants were among the occupations with the highest mortality rate, 15.7 per 100,000 women.

Ben Humberstone, head of health and life events analysis at the NSO, said the analysis does not conclusively prove that different jobs have higher risks of catching and dying from coronavirus .

Figures from the Office of National Statistics released today show that male nurses and doctors - who treated the sickest patients with Covid-19, many without proper protective equipment - died at a rate of 30 for 100,000 men. Among male nursing home staff, the rate was 50.1 per 100,000

Figures from the Office of National Statistics released today show that male nurses and doctors – who treated the sickest patients with Covid-19, many without proper protective equipment – died at a rate of 30 for 100,000 men. Among male nursing home staff, the rate was 50.1 per 100,000

Women in nursing homes (19.1 deaths per 100,000) were also more severely affected than women doctors and nurses (11). But the risk of dying from a coronavirus was significantly lower than that observed in men

Women in nursing homes (19.1 deaths per 100,000) were also more severely affected than women doctors and nurses (11). But the risk of dying from a coronavirus was significantly lower than that observed in men

The report has been adjusted for age, but not for other factors such as ethnicity and place of residence. It also did not take into account the employment of other family members in the household, which could increase exposure to members of the same household.

Humberstone added: “There are many complex things going on during the pandemic and the risk of death involving COVID-19 is influenced by a variety of factors, including the work someone does, but also the age, ethnicity, and underlying health conditions.

“We also know that people living in the most disadvantaged local areas and those living in urban areas such as London have been shown to have the highest death rates involving COVID-19.

“Today’s analysis shows that jobs involving close proximity to others, and those where there is regular exposure to the disease, have some of the highest death rates from COVID-19.

“However, our results do not conclusively prove that the observed death rates involving COVID-19 are necessarily caused by differences in occupational exposure. “

The ONS has identified 17 jobs that have increased the chances of dying from coronavirus in men and has found that 11 of them have statistically higher proportions of workers from black, Asian and ethnic minority backgrounds (BAME ).

For women, four specific occupations had increased mortality rates, including public administration workers, to 23.4 deaths per 100,000, nursing home workers (19.1), vendors (15, 7) and health personnel (15.3).

Are Doctors Improving Covid-19 Treatment? Coronavirus death rate in Britain fell to a quarter of its level during the peak of the crisis

The risk of dying from coronavirus after being hospitalized has dropped since the peak of the epidemic, suggesting that doctors are improving treatment.

An analysis from the University of Oxford shows that 6% of people admitted to English hospitals with the virus died in early April.

But figures show that as of June 15, only 1.5% of Covid-19 patients were dying from the disease – a quarter of the level at the height of the crisis.

Oxford statisticians cannot explain exactly why survival rates have dropped so much – but they think doctors are getting better at treating the virus.

In April, no drug was approved to treat Covid-19, a disease still shrouded in mystery after moving from animals to humans in late 2019.

But now the NHS now has two drugs at its disposal to treat critically ill patients – the remdesivir and the anti-inflammatory steroid dexamethasone.

Dexamethasone, a £ 5 steroid that has been around for decades, was the first proven drug to reduce the death rate in hospital patients needing oxygen.

The evidence for remdesivir is more mixed, but studies have shown that it helps the most seriously ill people who need ventilation.

There are also probably fewer people getting coronavirus in the hospital than at the height of the crisis, which may have contributed to lower mortality rates.

Hospital patients are inherently more likely to be already sick or elderly and are therefore more likely to die if caught.

An analysis from the University of Oxford shows that 6% of people admitted to English hospitals with the virus died in early April. But figures show that as of June 15, only 1.5% of Covid-19 patients were victims of the disease - a quarter of the level at the top

An analysis from the University of Oxford shows that 6% of people admitted to English hospitals with the virus died in early April. But figures show that as of June 15, only 1.5% of Covid-19 patients were victims of the disease – a quarter of the level at the top

Of 10,387 people hospitalized in England with Covid-19 on April 2, 644 died, representing a mortality rate of 6%.

On June 15, 50 of the 3,270 hospitalized patients were victims of the disease, which represents approximately 1.5%.

The researchers examined whether those admitted to the hospital were younger and therefore more likely to survive.

The decline in new coronavirus cases has “leveled off” as data show that between 1,900 and 3,200 people still catch Covid-19 in England every day

Between 1,900 and 3,200 people get coronavirus every day in England – but the rate at which the epidemic is decreasing has “stabilized”, according to the data.

The estimate was lower than last week, when two separate expert projections from King’s College London and the Office for National Statistics (ONS) ranged from 3,200 to 3,800.

King’s College’s COVID Symptom Tracker app predicts 1,978 people in England will be hit daily. The NSO, whose estimate is based on population swabs, puts the figure at around 3,142.

But statisticians have warned that the number of people infected with Covid-19 could have even increased – from 33,000 a fortnight ago to 51,000 on June 21, or about 0.09% of the population (one in 1 100).

The ONS explained that the extremely small sample size – the number is based only on 14 positive tests, up from 10 last week – may have influenced the estimate. Experts didn’t just say that the epidemic had rebounded and started to increase again, stating instead that there was no evidence that it was increasing or decreasing.

Government counselors said today that the R rate for the United Kingdom and England has been between 0.7 and 0.9 for the third consecutive week. But they admitted it could reach 1.0 in the northwest. Number 10’s scientific advisory committee, SAGE, also revealed today that the growth rate – how the number of new daily cases changes every day – is still between minus four and minus two percent.

Prime Minister Boris Johnson this week lifted the coronavirus lockout dramatically, bringing the country out of “hibernation” – with a comeback for pubs, haircuts and weddings and family and friends getting the green light to meet indoors for the first time in months.

Prime Minister has said he wants to “make life easier” after an “incredibly difficult period” with bars, restaurants, cinemas and hairdressers in England able to restart from July 4 – nicknamed “Super Saturday”.

But data has shown that there are currently more deaths over the age of 60 than at the peak in early April.

Jason Oke of the University of Oxford was one of the statisticians behind the British analysis.

He told The Times that it was initially uncomfortable to publish the analysis, adding, “We sat on it. We had a good discussion about it to try to find all of the different ways we could be wrong.

“Then we thought we should publish it – that’s what we observed. The caveat is, we don’t really understand why this is happening. But it does happen.

Other hard-hit countries, including the United States and Italy, are experiencing similar trends in their death rates.

Dr. Oke admitted that the newly approved drugs may be part of the cause of the fall, but said there are other factors at play.

He warned that a less optimistic explanation could be that a large number of mild to moderately ill patients were expelled from hospitals in April.

He said: “Perhaps at the start of the pandemic, when we thought we would be overwhelmed, we only took the most serious cases. “

If only the sickest patients – who are more likely to die from Covid – are treated, this could skew the mortality rate, even if there was no difference in the actual survival rate.

The total number of people who die with Covid-19 in English hospitals each week has decreased by 4.3% per day, which means that the number of people has halved every 16 days.

Deaths peaked at 899 on April 8, but have since dropped to just 50 during the week ending June 15.

The number of people hospitalized with a coronavirus also increased from a peak of 15,702 on April 10 to 2,891 on June 19 – which means that the number has halved each month.

Data shows that between 1,900 and 3,200 people get coronavirus every day in England – but the rate at which the epidemic is decreasing has “stabilized,” according to the data.

The estimate was lower than last week, when two separate expert projections from King’s College London and the Office for National Statistics (ONS) ranged from 3,200 to 3,800.

King’s College’s COVID Symptom Tracker app predicts 1,978 people in England will be hit daily. The NSO, whose estimate is based on population swabs, puts the figure at around 3,142.

But statisticians have warned that the number of people infected with Covid-19 could have even increased – from 33,000 a fortnight ago to 51,000 on June 21, or about 0.09% of the population (one in 1 100).

The ONS explained that the extremely small sample size – the number is based only on 14 positive tests, up from 10 last week – may have influenced the estimate.

The COVID Symptom Tracker app from King's College London estimates that only 2,341 Britons are affected by the coronavirus daily. Last week, they used this data to estimate that there were 3,612 people catching the virus every day in Britain and around 4,942 people the week before. The figure was over 11,000 a day a month ago

The COVID Symptom Tracker app from King’s College London estimates that only 2,341 Britons are affected by the coronavirus daily. Last week, they used the data to estimate that there were 3,612 people catching the virus every day in Britain and around 4,942 people the week before. The figure was over 11,000 a day a month ago

Experts didn’t just say that the epidemic had rebounded and started to increase again, stating instead that there was no evidence that it was increasing or decreasing.

Government counselors said today that the R rate for the United Kingdom and England has been between 0.7 and 0.9 for the third consecutive week. But they admitted it could reach 1.0 in the northwest. Number 10’s scientific advisory committee, SAGE, also revealed today that the growth rate – how the number of new daily cases changes every day – is still between minus four and minus two percent.

Prime Minister Boris Johnson this week lifted the coronavirus lockout dramatically, bringing the country out of “hibernation” – with a comeback for pubs, haircuts and weddings and family and friends getting the green light to meet indoors for the first time in months.

Prime Minister has said he wants to “make life easier” after an “incredibly difficult period” with bars, restaurants, cinemas and hairdressers in England able to restart from July 4 – nicknamed “Super Saturday”.

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