Boris pledges billions to detonate Britain after coronavirus crisis with huge stimulus package

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Boris Johnson pledges today to spend tens of billions of pounds to save the UK economy from disaster following the coronavirus epidemic.

In an exclusive interview with The Mail on Sunday, the Prime Minister promises a blitz of hospitals, schools, housing estates and road and rail infrastructure projects “ready to start”, while a “guarantee of ‘opportunity’ will aim to save the jobs of workers who have lost in the labor market.

Signaling a clear break with David Cameron’s austerity policies following the 2008 financial crisis, Johnson said he would “double” his commitment to “level out” the distribution of wealth across the country. .

He says, “It was a huge, huge shock to the country, but we are going to bounce back very well. We want to rebuild our path to health.

“If Covid were a lightning bolt, we are about to have the thunderbolt of economic consequences. We will be ready.

Noting a clear break with David Cameron’s austerity policies following the 2008 financial crisis, Johnson said he would “double” his commitment to “level out” the distribution of wealth across the country. .

“The lesson is to act quickly and we are going to make sure that we have plans to help people whose old jobs are no longer there to get the opportunities they need.” We are absolutely not going back to the austerity of ten years ago. “

The Prime Minister will announce the details of his plan – which he describes as “a very big moment” – in a fixed speech Tuesday, which will be followed by an economic statement by Chancellor Rishi Sunak next month.

Mr. Johnson’s wish came as:

  • He responded to rumors of Westminster’s poor health by pressing Downing Street during the interview and saying he felt “as fit as a butcher dog”.
  • Travel agencies have announced their biggest sales of every Saturday before next week’s launch of the signaling system that will allow Britons to go on vacation to the safest destinations without having to be quarantined for 14 days.
  • The UK recorded 100 more coronavirus deaths, the lowest number on Saturday since the lockout started and nearly a quarter less than seven days earlier.
  • Students are expected to return to school in September, with Conservative MPs concerned about the “savage” behavior of children who are no longer forced to go to school.
  • Housing Secretary Robert Jenrick was put under further pressure for managing the development of a £ 1 billion conservative donor property after a whistleblower accused Mr. Jenrick of playing “quickly and freely ”with the case.

The Prime Minister will use his speech Tuesday to announce the creation of a task force – dubbed “Project Speed” and led by Mr. Sunak – to reduce the time required to provide “high quality infrastructure”.

Ongoing projects include plans for 40 new hospitals, 10,000 additional prison spaces and a school reconstruction program.

“I’m as fit as a butcher dog now,” said Boris. “The country will rebound and I certainly feel full of beans. I have never felt better. ” Above, Boris is doing his pushups in the den

Johnson told the newspaper, “We are going to need a very committed and dynamic plan: not just for infrastructure, not just for investment, but to make sure young people have the confidence they need. so that we help them get into a workplace, maintain their skills, continue to learn on the job and get a highly paid and highly skilled job that will keep them in good shape for a long time.

“We are going to have internship plans, support young people in jobs, apprenticeships, bring people to the workplace, make sure their skills don’t just fall into disuse and we will give a guarantee of opportunity to all young people. ‘

But he also called on the British people to exercise restraint when pubs, restaurants and hotels open on July 4, and warned that if the crowded beach scenes during last week’s heat wave were repeated , he would not hesitate to order each city to be micro-locked. .

Describing the coronavirus crisis as “one of the greatest challenges this country has faced in 75 years,” Johnson said, “The government has done some things well, but most importantly, the public did it right.

“I tell these people who go out in large groups – you may think that you are immortal, that you will not suffer, but the bug that you carry can kill your family and friends.”

Is he able to help Carrie with diaper changes and night feeds? Choosing carefully his words, he says:

Is he able to help Carrie with diaper changes and night feeds? Choosing carefully his words, he says: “I am both present and involved in detail. All are doing very well, all are healthy and happy. ”

“We want to arrive in a world where we are as close to normal as possible as quickly as possible. I don’t want a second lock.

“Wherever there is a local epidemic, whether in Ashfield or Angelsea, we will authorize local authorities to quarantine all those affected, to test the time of infection and to make the necessary closures . “

During his interview, when asked if he was helping to take care of Wilfred, his two-month-old son with fiance Carrie Symonds, changing diapers and giving him night meals, Mr. Johnson said he was “both present and involved in a way” adding that “all is well, all are healthy and happy”.

And referring to improving his health, Mr. Johnson said that the security guards who accompanied him during his morning run had “detected in the past few days a noticeable shift and … were starting themselves to do a light trot. “

He said, “I’m now as fit as a butcher dog.

“The country will rebound and I certainly feel full of beans. I have never felt better. “

I’m “full of beans” after a fear of the virus, I’m “present and involved” with diapers and I’m “more woking than woke”: Boris Johnson addresses The Mail on Sunday at number 10

Interview by Glen Owen

“Do you want me to put some pressure on you to show you how fit I am?” With these words, the Prime Minister rushes to the floor of his Downing Street office with an exuberance that seems to have been absent in recent months.

It’s hard to imagine Churchill or Gladstone doing something similar – and completely impossible to imagine Theresa May – but Boris Johnson wants to update Westminster rumors about his health since he was hit by Covid-19 earlier today. year.

“In the shape of a butcher dog … I have never felt so good”, as the 56-year-old man says, after months of debilitating political drama, a brush to death and the arrival of a new child .

Now Boris hopes to revitalize his confused-looking government by injecting billions of pounds into the British economy to “rebuild our path to health.”

He will use an important speech Tuesday to outline his plan for a post-Covid economic recovery and, in the process, begin to define the nebulous political credo of “Johnsonism”.

`` If you want to see what gets me out of bed in the morning, I look at the basic injustice - there are all kinds of people who do not have the opportunities and the opportunities they need in this country and there has a tremendous amount of it, enormous talent, untapped, unsuspected, all over the UK. (In the photo above, the Prime Minister and Carrie Symonds participate in a Clap for Carers round)

“If you want to see what gets me out of bed in the morning, I look at the basic injustice – there are all kinds of people who do not have the opportunities and the opportunities they need in this country and there are has tremendously, enormous talent, untapped, unsuspected, all over the UK. (In the photo above, the Prime Minister and Carrie Symonds participate in a Clap for Carers round)

The David Cameron-George Osborne era austerity is avoided in favor of madness over new hospitals, schools and housing projects, as well as the acceleration of “ready to go” infrastructure projects such as HS2.

Downing Street strategists fear that unless they act quickly, the economic devastation caused by the coronavirus will strike the conservatives in the former seats of the northern “Red Wall”, who went from Labor to Tories during last elections.

The specter of a return to mass unemployment in the 1980s hides behind the government’s new promise of a “guarantee of opportunity” to boost the employability of workers hardest hit by the crisis.

This is all part of what Boris calls “race to the top”, to bridge the gap with the wealthy – many of whom have survived, if not thrived, during the foreclosure.

“It was a huge, huge shock for the country, but we are going to bounce back very well.

“We want to rebuild our path to health,” said Boris, who hopes the speech will begin to draw a line under continued criticism of the way his government is managing the epidemic.

Is it time to renovate an office?

He is believed to be Boris Johnson’s equivalent of the Oval Office – the little “den” of the Cabinet Room that has served as the Prime Minister’s Office since Tony Blair’s time at No10.

But in stark contrast to Donald Trump’s lavish surroundings, the den is cramped, with worn carpets, dragging threads, and books tucked away carelessly on the shelves next to family photos – including, since Boris moved in, one of him with Carrie and baby Wilfred.

A table in the middle of the room serves as a meeting place, with a small sofa stuffed in the corner used as “overflow”.

The only clue to the occupier’s status is the securely encrypted “red phone” used to talk to other world leaders who is sitting by the window overlooking garden 10.

Mr. Blair used the room to meet assistants in a laid-back, casual style, later described pejoratively as “couch government.”

Gordon Brown preferred an office at No. 12, but when David Cameron became Prime Minister in 2010, he took over the operations of the den.

Theresa May typically left a sofa and replaced it with the table to make the room look more “serious”.

“We will double as we progress. If Covid were a lightning bolt, we’re about to have the thunderbolt of economic consequences.

“We will be ready. The lesson is to act quickly and we will make sure that we have plans to help people whose old jobs are no longer there to get the opportunities they need.

“We are absolutely not going back to the austerity of ten years ago. “

The speech will be followed next month by an economic statement by Chancellor Rishi Sunak, with the aim of demonstrating that the occupants of numbers 10 and 11 are in line with the strategy.

Rumors of the Prime Minister’s health have been circulating since his return to Downing Street after his dramatic life-long struggle in intensive care.

Reportedly, he slept during the day and struggled to juggle the demands of the fight against the epidemic with the needs of his two-month-old son Wilfred.

Quite nonsense, says Boris. He has returned to his pre-Covid routine of running at 6:30 a.m. each morning with Dilyn, the dog he shares with fiance Carrie Symonds, although he admits that until a few days ago, his jogging was running at hardly.

“I turned around and saw my detectives walking. But I want you to know that I’m picking up speed now. They have detected a notable slowdown in recent days and they themselves are starting to do a light trot. “

Is he able to help Carrie with diaper changes and night feeds?

Choosing carefully his words, he says: “I am both present and involved in detail. All are doing very well, all are healthy and happy. ”

What about paternity leave?

” Who? He said, looking puzzled.

‘Yours.’

“Ahh, uh … it hasn’t seemed to arise so far. “

Boris’ struggle for life or death in intensive care, shortly before Wilfred’s birth, deepened his “already deep admiration for the NHS,” he says – but also gave him “a sense of urgency.” “

“I’m as fit as a butcher dog now,” he says. “The country will rebound and I certainly feel full of beans. I have never felt better. ”

There is mounting evidence that many Covid victims – especially those like PM who ended up in intensive care – suffer from long-term effects, including lung scarring and cognitive problems. But Boris considers himself one of the luckiest.

“We are still learning new things about the disease,” he says. “Lots and lots of people have had a very complete and healthy recovery and I seem to be one of them. “

The Prime Minister got engaged to Mrs. Symonds late last year, but is clearly reluctant to discuss plans for the wedding and honeymoon.

“You and your readers will be among the first to know if there is a change in this situation,” he promises.

What’s on the PM’s Reading List?

Prime Minister's book Seventy-two Virgins tells of efforts by unhappy, disheveled bicycle MP to thwart terrorist attack

Prime Minister’s book Seventy-two Virgins reports efforts of unhappy, disheveled bicycle MP to thwart terrorist attack

Foreign policy seems to be at the forefront of Boris Johnson’s mind as tougher Brexit talks loom – if his reading list is anything.

Books stacked on a cart in his office include Modern Diplomacy, by Professor Ronald Barston, international relations specialist, and the acclaimed biography of Margaret Thatcher by Charles Moore.

And maybe he’s looking for inspiration from Brexit in motivational books that include Be The Lion, which offers advice on “how to overcome the big challenges and get there.”

Perhaps the most surprising additions are the good condition by ardent Remainer AC Grayling and why Europe should become a republic by the German thinker Ulrike Guérot.

A foul play by Lord Ashcroft, exposing the captive-bred lions industry in South Africa, and an autobiography of Kurdish fighter Diana Nammi also await the Prime Minister’s attention.

Mr. Johnson is himself a successful author.

His four books include The Churchill Factor, on the wartime chief, and Seventy-Two Virgins of 2004, on the efforts of an unhappy deputy on a bicycle and his hair disheveled to thwart a terrorist attack …

Throughout his dual career in journalism and politics, Boris has flirted with the limits of freedom of expression and deliberately courted the controversy – as when he told the Mail on Sunday that Ms. May had placed a “vest suicide ”around the British constitution with its Brexit deal. .

Thus, the recent outbreak of “awakened” political correctness, including the removal of statues of historically controversial figures and police “kneeling” in solidarity with the Black Lives Matters movement, must place him in a dilemma.

As he often does when he’s in such a position, he makes a question about “taking the knee” with a joke: “I’m more Woking than Woke!” He said, before adding quickly, “I prefer to talk about what we are doing positively.

“The Black Lives Matter campaign is extremely important because I think a lot of people think they don’t have the opportunity to express their talents.

“Many people think there are barriers in their lives, and that goes for blacks and ethnic minorities across this country. “

The rough outlines of “Johnsonism” are beginning to appear, Boris describing it as “the basic symmetry between the creation of a fantastic public platform of infrastructure, schools and technology, through which private enterprise and private genius can flourish. It’s balance. “

Reheating his theme, he continues: “What is happening is that we have put our arms around millions of people.

“Things have changed quickly [during the peak of the Covid crisis], protect the NHS, get the fans early, deploy the support, so I’m confident the government is now working to help the country get through this in a very, very good shape.

“We are going to have internship plans, support young people in jobs, apprenticeships, bring people to the workplace, make sure their skills don’t just fall into disuse and we will give a guarantee of opportunity to all young people. ‘

Boris described his speech in the Midlands on Tuesday as “a great moment,” saying, “We are going to need a very committed and dynamic plan: not just for infrastructure, not just for investment, but to ensure that young people have the confidence they need to help us find jobs, maintain skills, continue learning on the job and get high-paying, highly-skilled jobs that will keep them in good shape for a long time to come.

“If you want to see what gets me out of bed in the morning, I look at the basic injustice – there are all kinds of people who do not have the opportunities and the opportunities they need in this country and there are has tremendously, tremendous talent, untapped, unsuspected, all over the UK.

“They have no one who takes them to one side and says that you have talent and that you are the future.

“There is a huge difference in opportunity across the country. “

Boris Johnson wants to undermine Westminster rumors about his health since he was overthrown by Covid-19 earlier this year (photo above with Glen Owen)

Boris Johnson wants to undermine Westminster rumors about his health since he was overthrown by Covid-19 earlier this year (photo above with Glen Owen)

This is the kind of political riff that could have been uttered by the new leader of the Labor Party, Sir Keir Starmer, whose election helped to close the gap in opinion polls by a few points.

But Boris refuses to recognize Starmer’s biggest threat to Jeremy Corbyn, or whether Starmer was right to dismiss Rebecca Long-Bailey from the Labor bench for sending a tweet to Israel.

“I think the best thing in politics is to focus on what you do – your own agenda and vision for the country,” he says.

When pubs and restaurants reopen on July 4, Boris will celebrate with a pint – but he won’t say where. “I will not spoil any hotel business with my imminent presence”.

He fears the prospect of having to lock the economy again if there is a second wave of virus, and says that if scenes such as crowds crowded on Bournemouth Beach repeat, he will close the affected cities.

“The government did some things well, but the most important thing was that the public did it right.

“I tell these people who go out in large groups – you may think that you are immortal, that you will not suffer, but the bug that you carry can kill your family and friends.”

“I don’t want a second lockdown, but wherever there is a local epidemic, whether in Ashfield or Angelsea, we will allow local authorities to quarantine anyone who caught it, to test the time of infection and to make the necessary closings. ”

Prime Minister, student passionate about history, expects posterity to record the crisis as “one of the greatest challenges this country has faced in 75 years … I think the judgment on the people British will be that he has shown exceptional patience, good humor and determination.

The judgment on Boris’ performance will have to await the official investigation, expected after the end of the crisis.

Until the impromptu workout, Boris had, according to his criteria, seemed moderate – the energy slightly attenuated, the distinctive phrase turns perhaps less baroque than before – perhaps not surprising given the enormity recent events.

He needs a summer vacation and will take it to the UK.

“It is the most beautiful place in the world. We have a fantastic tourism industry, fantastic places to stay all over the UK, ”he says.

“If I think back to my best vacation, it is often that of this country, in Scotland, in Wales, in Cornwall, in Devon.

“Why go elsewhere? “

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