BBC reporter George Alagiah, 64, reveals that his bowel cancer has spread to his lungs

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BBC reporter George Alagiah revealed that his bowel cancer has now spread to his lungs.

The presenter, 64, was first diagnosed in 2014 and later said it had spread to the liver and lymph nodes.

He has now revealed that doctors told him in April that cancer is now in his lungs.

Alagiah said, “My doctors have never used the word” chronic “or” cure “about my cancer.

“They also never used the word” terminal “. I always said to my oncologist, “Tell me when I need to take care of my business,” and he didn’t tell me, but what he told me was that cancer is now in a third organ. It’s in my lungs.

Alagiah, who tested positive for Covid-19 in March, said he had kept the latest development a secret, only telling his publisher.

George Alagiah, 64, was first diagnosed in 2014 and later said it has spread to the liver and lymph nodes.

He told The Times, “I said to my doctor,” You are going to have to worry about me. ” I don’t want to worry. I just know he’s a smart guy, doing everything he can.

Alagiah said his chemotherapy has increased due to the spread of the cancer.

Born in Sri Lanka, Mr. Alagiah was diagnosed with bowel cancer in April 2014 and again in December 2017.

Mr. Alagiah underwent 17 cycles of chemotherapy to treat advanced bowel cancer in 2014 before returning to work in 2015.

In January 2018, he revealed that the cancer had returned.

In March, he had a two-week battle with the coronavirus that forced him to stay away from the newsroom.

Appearing on BBC News after defeating the virus, Alagiah said his cancer diagnoses had given him “an advantage” to overcome his “light dose” of the insect.

In November, Mr. Alagiah revealed that he had chosen to ignore mortality statistics related to his illness.

Speaking to the Bowel Cancer UK podcast, he said he had examined his life for six months after receiving the news, and decided that he was happy despite his illness.

He said, “I decided I didn’t want to know the survival statistics. It’s a very unpredictable disease, you are good one week and not the next, good luck one year and not the next.

The journalist, who lives in north London with his wife Frances, had to weigh the positives and negatives of his life to make peace after receiving the bad news.

Mr. Alagiah (photo above in 2018) underwent 17 cycles of chemotherapy to treat advanced bowel cancer in 2014 before returning to work in 2015

Mr. Alagiah (pictured above in 2018) underwent 17 cycles of chemotherapy to treat advanced bowel cancer in 2014 before returning to work in 2015

He credits his wife Frances (pictured together above) for helping him get through difficult times

He credits his wife Frances (pictured together above) for helping him get through difficult times

He said, “It took me about three to six months after my diagnosis, I called him to get to a place of contentment. I needed this. “

Speaking on the How to Fail podcast in October on his battle with cancer, he said, “I’m not really afraid of death. I am not for me. That’s all I know and I had to work in my head.

“I’m on a scan to know maybe this thing will happen as soon as possible.”

He thanks his family, his wife Frances, with whom he lives in north London, and his two sons Adam and Matthew for helping him through difficult times.

“I took care of it myself, but I find it very difficult when I think of my loved ones and in particular of the woman who loves me, and whom I have loved since 1976 – Frances. “

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