Attorney General William Barr Defends DOJ In Michael Flynn: NPR

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In an interview with the NPR, US Attorney General William Barr defended the Justice Department amid accusations of political interference, most recently in the case of former national security adviser Michael Flynn.

Eman Mohammed for NPR

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Eman Mohammed for NPR

In an interview with the NPR, US Attorney General William Barr defended the Department of Justice amid accusations of political interference, most recently in the case of former national security adviser Michael Flynn.

Eman Mohammed for NPR

Attorney General William Barr said Thursday that he did not believe President Trump had crossed the border between the White House and the Department of Justice in a number of recent big cases.

Barr told NPR in a large interview that he believed Trump had “supervisory authority” to oversee the smooth running of justice – but Barr said that ultimately the choices were made and made independently by the Ministry of Justice.

“It is very important for the Attorney General to ensure that there is no political influence at stake – and there was none,” said Barr.

Steve Inskeep of NPR asked Barr about the case of former national security adviser Michael Flynn, in which the Department of Justice dropped the charges even after Flynn’s guilty plea; the dismissal of US Attorney Geoffrey Berman in New York; and on the others.

Barr criticized what he called “irregularities” in the Flynn case, which he said justified his solving the problem by dropping the charge. And he denied there was anything suspicious about the replacement for Berman, including any connection to ongoing investigations that may involve Trump associates.

“Whenever you make a personnel move, conspiracy theorists will suggest that there is a hidden motive involved,” said Barr.

Unconfirmed Theory of Mail Fraud

Barr also defended his recent comments in which he claimed without evidence that foreign countries could potentially forge “millions” of ballots to interfere with the presidential race in November.

This is an assertion that a number of election officials and experts have dismissed, calling it “absurd” and “false.” State officials from both sides have lobbied for better access to ballots in response to the coronavirus pandemic.

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