A green glow seen in the atmosphere of Mars, similar to that of Earth from the space station- Technology News, Firstpost

0
67


Astronomers have identified a green glow in the Martian atmosphere, similar to the glow observed by space station astronauts when they look toward Earth.

According to a BBC report, the glow comes from oxygen atoms when they are excited by sunlight. Although it has long been predicted to occur on other planets, the Trace Gas Orbiter (TGO), which is a joint European and Russian satellite on Mars, is the first to observe outside of the Earth.

“You never plan a mission to research this kind of thing. Today we need to be very clear about the science we are going to do before we get to Mars, “said Dr. Manish Patel of the Open University of the United Kingdom, speaking about the conclusion. “But once we got there, we thought, ‘Well, let’s take a look.’ And it worked. “

 Green glow seen in the atmosphere of Mars, similar to Earth from the space station

Artist’s impression of TGO on Mars. TGO detects excited oxygen not with an imaging camera (so no pretty pictures) but with its Nomad spectrometer housing. This instrument sees oxygen at very particular altitudes. Image: ESA

The results of the study, published in the journal Nature astronomy, Add that the emissions are the consequence of collisions between atmospheric molecules and charged particles which move away from the sun. On Earth, these interactions are strongly influenced by the strong magnetic field of the planet, which pulls the particles towards the two magnetic poles.

In one declaration by the European Space Agency, lead author Jean-Claude Gerard of the University of Liège in Belgium said: “One of the brightest shows seen on Earth comes from the night glow. More specifically, from oxygen atoms emitting a particular wavelength of light that has never been seen around another planet. ”

the declaration also points out that this show should have been on Mars for about 40 years.

Astronauts aboard the ISS in 2011 saw a green band of oxygen glow visible on the Earth's curve. On the surface, parts of North Africa are visible, with evening lights shining along the Nile and its delta. Image: NASA

Astronauts aboard the ISS in 2011 saw a green band of visible oxygen glow on the Earth’s curve. On the surface, parts of North Africa are visible, with evening lights shining along the Nile and its delta. Image: NASA

Jean-Claude and the team were able to locate the program using NOMAD (Nadir and Occultation for Mars Discovery) and including the ultraviolet and visible spectrometer (UVIS).

Study co-author Ann Carine Vandaele, principal investigator at NOMAD, said that the study authors decided to point to the “edge” of Mars and found emissions at an altitude of about 80 kilometers, which also depended on the changing distance between Mars and the sun.

Understanding the properties of the atmosphere of Mars is essential for operational missions on the planet, USA today reported.

According to ESA, studying the glow of planetary atmospheres can provide a wealth of information on its composition and dynamics, even revealing how energy is deposited there by sunlight and the solar wind.

Find the latest and upcoming technical gadgets online at Tech2 Gadgets. Receive tech news, reviews, and gadget reviews. Popular gadgets including specifications for laptop, tablet and mobile, features, price, comparison.



LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here