Victory Day Celebrations: How The Queen Sneaked Into The Crowd And Danced The Conga In The Ritz | UK News

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According to a family member, the Queen celebrated Victory Day 75 years ago by dancing at The Ritz in a “Cinderella upside down” moment.

As Britain celebrated victory in Europe against Nazi Germany, the royal family and Buckingham Palace were a focal point for crowds in London.

But it was also a rare night of freedom for Princess Elizabeth at the time and her sister Princess Margaret.

File photo dated 08/05/45 showing huge crowds in Trafalgar Square, London, celebrating Victory in Europe Day in London, marking the end of World War II in Europe, 75 years ago.
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Huge crowds in Trafalgar Square in London celebrated VE Day

Margaret Rhodes, the queen’s cousin, joined them in the crowd that evening.

Her daughter, Victoria Pryor, said that the group had been authorized by King George VI and the Queen to go out and that Princess Elizabeth was wearing her uniform.

Mrs. Pryor told Sky News: “Mom said it was just the most exciting and exciting night and she always referred to it as a Cinderella moment but vice versa for the two princesses.

“They went out and everyone was screaming for the king and the queen to go out on the balcony. Seeing their parents on the balcony from this position with the ordinary people on the street had to be absolutely extraordinary. “

Pryor said her mother often likes to remember how she danced at The Ritz, saying, “They all had the most amazing time.

“They went to Trafalgar Square and the Ritz, and mom said they had conga across the Ritz. The look of disapproval on the matron women having their dinners was just great.

Margaret Rhodes (then Elphinstone), second from left, with other members of the royal family
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Margaret Rhodes (then Elphinstone), second from left, with other members of the royal family
Victoria Pryor said her mother often talked about her celebrations with the Queen
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Victoria Pryor said her mother often talked about her celebrations with the Queen

“She said it was amazing that you saw all these people kissing and canoeing in Hyde Park, and they all had very protected lives. It was a huge revelation to see this wave of hugs and love. “

The story of that night is told in her mother’s book The Final Curtsey.

Margaret Rhodes, who died in 2016, spent much of the Second World War with the two princesses and stayed in rooms in Buckingham Palace at the end.

According to Mrs. Pryor, the queen helped her mother remember the events of VE Day Night when she wrote her book.

“She asked the queen and the queen very generously gave her a lot of information from her own journal, which you weren’t expecting and it was really lovely,” said Ms. Pryor.

The uniform worn by Princess Elizabeth that evening is currently on display at the National Army Museum in London.

The uniform worn by Princess Elizabeth
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The uniform worn by Princess Elizabeth

She joined the auxiliary territorial service only four months before the end of the war, but a letter recently found in the archives revealed the reason.

It was not only because her father was reluctant to join her, but because Princess Elizabeth had mumps.

Emma Mawdsley, collection development manager at the National Army Museum, said the princess had expressed an interest in joining her at 18, but her father felt she already had a job as a first in line with the throne.

However, the young princess was “insistent” to join.

Princess Elizabeth joined the auxiliary territorial service. Photo: National Army Museum
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Princess Elizabeth joined the auxiliary territorial service. Photo: National Army Museum

More letters in the archives show how good the morale was for the others who served to see her register.

Mawdsley added, “The military had a reputation for not being as glamorous as the Navy or the Air Force.

“The green uniform was not the most glamorous and the brown stockings and shoes. It sounds crazy but it has had an effect on the people who sign up. “

“So having the cache of the young princess joining the ATS was extremely important to the service and that would have helped recruiting. “

Princess Elizabeth was & # 39; insistent & # 39; upon joining. Photo: National Army Museum
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Princess Elizabeth insisted on joining the auxiliary territorial service. Photo: National Army Museum

Friday evening, the Queen will address the nation with a recorded message at Windsor Castle.

It will be broadcast at 9 p.m., along with his father, King George VI, speaking in radio in the country in 1945.

Other members of the royal family will make video calls to veterans, while Prince Charles and the Duchess of Cornwall will lead the nation in a two-minute silence from Scotland.

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