The graph showing the actual magnitude of deaths in the Northwest during the coronavirus pandemic

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This graph shows the devastating impact of the coronavirus on the number of deaths in the Northwest compared to previous years.

Data released by the National Statistics Office (ONS) shows a significant peak in recorded deaths compared to the same period in previous years.

The graph represents all recorded deaths from all causes showing a strong increase in April 2020. This increase is mainly due to coronaviruses.

There were 1,704 more deaths than the five-year average during the week ending April 24 – 1,207 of them were related to COVID-19.



Comparison of registered deaths with previous years

The latest ONS data released on Tuesday, May 5, showed that deaths from coronaviruses in hospitals appear to be decreasing while deaths in nursing homes continue to increase.

There were 394 COVID-19-related deaths in Greater Manchester during the week of April 18-24, down from 530 deaths the previous week.

The number of lives lost in hospitals fell from 366 to 231 in one week, while deaths in nursing homes fell again from 139 to 143.



There were 394 coronavirus deaths in Greater Manchester during the week of April 18-24, down from 530 deaths the previous week

The latest figures are based on the number of deaths registered up to May 2 when COVID-19 is mentioned on the death certificate.

Delays in registering deaths can increase the numbers a few days later.

Data from the ONS shows that the death toll from Greater Manchester coronavirus up to 24 April was 1,707.

Most were registered in hospital, with 1,198 patient deaths, but one in four were in nursing homes, for a total of 412.

73 deaths were also recorded at home, 14 in hospices, one in other communal establishments and nine “elsewhere”.

Communal facilities include prisons, residences, hotels and sheltered accommodation, while “elsewhere” covers deaths outside and those declared dead on arrival at the hospital.

Overall, COVID-19 has been a factor in 17% of deaths in Greater Manchester until April 24.

Separate figures also released Tuesday morning show that 411 deaths were reported to the Care Quality Commission (CQC) by nursing homes in Greater Manchester between April 10 and May 1.

Nursing homes must register deaths with the CQC as soon as they occur (usually within a few days), and since April 10, they have been asked to register deaths involving COVID-19, based on a nursing home statement.



Deaths involving Covid-19 in nursing homes in England and Wales

Figures include those where the nursing home believed the person had COVID-19 at the time of death, even if they had not been tested or diagnosed.

The virus may also not be registered on the death certificate.

Deaths involving COVID-19 represented half (51%) of all deaths in nursing homes in the region reported to the CQC between April 10 and May 1.



Nursing homes must register deaths with the CQC as soon as they occur

The ONS and CQC figures for nursing homes may differ as they are reported in different ways – the ONS figures are based on the date of death, but these take approximately 11 days to register, while CQC figures are based on when it is notified of a home death, which usually takes three to four days.

The most recent figures from CQC suggest that deaths in Greater Manchester nursing homes could decrease – with 134 deaths reported between April 25 and May 1, compared to 154 between April 18 and 24.

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