Taxi drivers, store staff and security guards are most likely to die from coronavirus, but doctors are NOT more at risk than the public

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Taxi drivers, shop workers, chefs and security guards are among the most likely to die from coronavirus – but doctors are no more at risk than the general public, new figures released today.

Men working in the least skilled jobs had the highest death rate involving Covid-19, according to the Office for National Statistics.

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    This graph shows that low-skilled workers are most likely to contract Covid-19
This graph shows that low-skilled workers are most likely to contract Covid-19
    Taxi driver wears face mask to protect against coronavirus in Bristol8
Taxi driver wears face mask to protect against coronavirus in BristolCredits: Getty Images – Getty

Male security officers are at greatest risk – and are four times more likely to die from coronavirus than the average human, while the threat to bus and coach drivers is more than double.

Interestingly, the mortality rate for health workers such as doctors and nurses was no higher than that of others of the same age and sex.

But the ONS found that men and women working in social services, including social workers and caregivers, had “significantly” higher death rates involving Covid-19 than the overall workforce .

Union boss says figures, arriving the day after Prime Minister Boris Johnson, said people should start going back to work if they can’t work from home on conditional plans to ease the lockdown , were “horrible”.

John Phillips, GMB’s acting secretary general, said, “These numbers are horrible, and they were drawn up before the chaos of last night’s announcement.

“If you are poorly paid and work during the Covid-19 crisis, you are more likely to die – that is how striking these numbers are.

“Ministers must suspend all return to work until guidelines, advice and enforcement are in place to keep people safe. “

    Security guards most likely to die from Covid-19, NSO figures8
Security guards most likely to die from Covid-19, ONS figures say
    Bus and taxi drivers more at risk for coronavirus

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Bus and taxi drivers more at risk for coronavirus

The ONS figures are based on an analysis of 2,494 recorded deaths from coronavirus among workers aged 20 to 64 in England and Wales up to and including April 20.

Overall, the researchers found that almost two-thirds of these deaths were men (1,612), with an average rate of 9.9 deaths per 100,000 people.

This is approximately double that of 882 deaths in women, representing a rate of 5.2 deaths involving Covid-19 per 100,000.

Among men in the least skilled jobs, the rate has doubled to 21.4 deaths per 100,000 men.

For security guards, that amounted to 45.7 deaths per 100,000, while taxi drivers and drivers had a rate of 36.4.

Male bus and coach operators had a rate of 26.4 deaths per 100,000, chefs a rate of 35.9 and sales and retail assistants a rate of 19.8.

For male social workers in England and Wales, the death rate involving Covid-19 is estimated at 23.4 deaths per 100,000 men, while for social workers the figure is 9.6 – two times higher than in the general population.

More than 30 bus drivers have died from the only coronavirus in London.

They fear that as more and more people return to work, they will be even more exposed.

Last month, we told how the family of London bus driver Mervyn Kennedy, 67, who died on April 7 of Covid-19, attributed his death to “a lack of personal protective equipment.”

John Murphy, leader of London bus workers at the Unite union, said: “Every London bus driver knows someone who is dead or in intensive care.

“There is a real feeling of disappointment. And the drivers are petrified of what will happen next. “

Meanwhile, nursing homes had to beg for equipment outside of beauty salons.

Some workers are so low in protective clothing that they have been forced to carry trash bags.

Professor Neil Pearce, professor of epidemiology and biostatistics at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, said the ONS report “confirms that in the working-age population, Covid-19 is largely a occupational disease “.

He said the results underscore that “we need to look beyond health care and social services, and that there is a wide range of occupations that may be at risk from Covid-19.”

“Many of the same professions are now being asked to return to work, in some cases without appropriate safety measures and PPE (personal protective equipment) in place,” he added.

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    ONS figures show that caregivers had a significantly higher death rate involving a coronavirus

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ONS figures show that caregivers had a significantly higher death rate involving a coronavirus
    London bus driver Mervyn Kennedy, 67, died of coronavirus on April 7

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London bus driver Mervyn Kennedy, 67, died of coronavirus on April 7Credits: GoFundMe

Boris Johnson last night urged people to be “actively encouraged to go to work” to kick-start the economy if they can’t do their homework.

He cited those in manufacturing and construction, while more people will return to their workplaces in the coming weeks.

More teachers will return to work when elementary school students start lessons from June 1.

Non-essential stores, including dry cleaners and take-out, could also reopen at around the same time, before restaurants and cafes reopen the following month – provided the infection rate continues to decline and they can meet strict conditions and social distancing.

A spokesperson for the Ministry of Health and Social Affairs (DHSC) said: “The death of a caregiver or health worker is a tragedy and the whole country recognizes the great work of social workers, nurses , doctors and many others on the front lines of this epidemic world. “

He said the government was working to ensure it had a “big picture” of the number of deaths among social workers and to provide support to affected workers in the sector and to families.

The ONS said its analysis “does not conclusively prove that the observed death rates involving Covid-19 are necessarily caused by differences in occupational exposure.”

He said the researchers adjusted the data by age, but not for other factors such as ethnicity or place of residence.

The results may change as more deaths are recorded, the ONS added.

    Care worker Suzanne Loverseed, who died at the age of 63 after contracting Covid-198
Care worker Suzanne Loverseed, who died at the age of 63 after contracting Covid-19
    Taxi driver Ayub Akhtar was only 33 years old when he died of a coronavirus

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Taxi driver Ayub Akhtar was only 33 years old when he died of a coronavirusCredits: GoFundMe

Bus driver dies of coronavirus after posting passenger cough video on Facebook

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