Scotland and Wales report 21 more coronavirus deaths

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England, Scotland and Wales today announced 111 new deaths from coronaviruses, the first Sunday since the drastic easing of the lockdown measures.

Another 90 people died of Covid-19 in hospitals in England, according to figures from NHS England. Health officials in Scotland have reported nine more deaths, while another 12 have died in Wales.

The death toll in Scotland and Wales includes the number of deaths in nursing homes. The figures for England are just hospital deaths.

In Scotland, an additional 90 people tested positive for the virus while another 162 confirmed cases were reported in Wales.

If the numbers remain as is, it would represent a drop of 58.7% from the number of deaths of 269 last week. However, figures for Northern Ireland have yet to be released.

The current figure is not the official count of the day which should be significantly higher.

The numbers follow a tumultuous week for the government in which approval ratings fell sharply after Prime Minister Boris Johnson laid out his strategy for lifting the lockdowns.

A new Opinium survey has shown that disapproval of PM’s response to the epidemic is now higher than approval for the very first time.

Some 39% of the nation supports government management of the crisis, down nine points from 48% last week, while disapproval has dropped from 36% to 42%.

Yesterday, Secretary of Education Gavin Williamson described reception plans, Years 1 and 6, which are expected to return on June 1.

The plan has come under heavy criticism from ministers, unions and local authorities, Labor MP Rachel Reeves said this morning that the government “has a lot more to do” to ensure that parents and staff are confident that the students will return.

England, Scotland and Wales today announced 111 new deaths from coronaviruses, the first Sunday since the drastic relaxation of lock-out measures

England, Scotland and Wales today announced 111 new deaths from coronaviruses, the first Sunday since the drastic easing of lockdown measures

Scotland and Wales today announced 21 more coronavirus deaths

Scotland and Wales today announced an additional 21 deaths from coronavirus. The figures follow a tumultuous week for the government in which approval rates fell sharply after Prime Minister Boris Johnson (photo) presented his strategy for lifting the foreclosure measures.

Today Michael Gove initially guaranteed the safety of returning teachers before admitting that there will be some

Today, Michael Gove initially guaranteed the safety of returning teachers before admitting that there will be some “risk”.

Nearly a third of negative coronavirus tests could be wrong, expert says

By VANESSA CHALMERS REPORTER HEALTH FOR MAILONLINE

Almost a third of the negative coronavirus test results could be false, scientists say, leaving thousands of people to believe they are virus-free.

People who are mistakenly told they don’t have the virus when in fact – called “false negatives” – could spread the disease if they think they can return to work safely.

The false negative results are mainly due to an incorrect swab, experts say. Health leaders have also admitted that the test itself, called the PCR test, is “not perfect.”

Health workers are trained to swab a potentially infected person, while home kits come with instructions – but experts say there are bound to be mistakes.

Scientists say it is “dangerous” to rely on test results to direct management only of the pandemic, in which at least 34,466 Britons died.

They argue that symptoms should not be ruled out simply because a person has a negative result and that they should be told to isolate themselves just in case.

So far, nearly 2.5 million tests have been done across the UK, according to the Department of Health, of which 240,161 have been positive.

Some 40% of the tests have been repeated to clarify if someone has gotten rid of the virus, such as when a patient leaves the hospital.

Public Health England has not disclosed the number of test results that could be incorrect.

But experts estimate that false negatives are in the range of 10-30%.

Reeves said the government has two weeks to implement the test and trace approach, hold talks with stakeholders and publish the science before schools take in more students.

She added, “The government still has a lot of work to do to give this assurance that it will be safer for more children to enter school in two weeks.”

But Michael Gove – the Minister of the Cabinet Office – today guaranteed that teachers and students will be safe when schools are reopened before quickly turning back, saying, “You can never eliminate the risks.”

Some teachers’ unions are blocking the move and have said they will not move until they are convinced that it is completely safe for teachers and children to return to class. But others have said they would recommend the reopening after talks with government experts.

Meanwhile, a number of local authorities have said they will not follow Boris Johnson’s foreclosure strategy and will be cautious about reopening schools.

Today, Mr. Gove tried to allay the concerns by insisting that it would be safe for teachers and students before making a screaming U-turn and admitting that there would be at least a certain level of risk.

His statements come on the first weekend since the lockdowns were partially lifted, allowing the British to get away from their homes to enjoy the outdoors.

The British woke up early and early this morning to hit parks and beaches across the country before temperatures hit 70F on Britain’s first Sunday since the lockout restrictions were eased.

While crowds of people were photographed enjoying the picturesque Dorset coastline and Londoners took advantage of the city’s green spaces, it seems that most of them take heed of the harsh warnings issued by rural spots this weekend.

In Brighton, Britons were photographed diving into the sea as dozens of others strolled along the cliff at Beachy Head, near Eastbourne, amid rising temperatures – which are expected to reach 28 ° C. Wednesday.

Several tourist offices warned that people would be turned away if they became too busy and urged visitors to be careful and respect the rules.

Countries including Denmark (photo) have already started reopening schools with social distancing measures in place

Countries including Denmark (photo) have already started reopening schools with social distancing measures in place

Police patrol Brighton Beach today as visitors take advantage of the warmer weather on the first weekend since the lockdowns were relaxed to allow people outside the house to sunbathe or visit public spaces

Police patrol Brighton Beach today as visitors take advantage of the warmer weather on the first weekend since the lockdowns were relaxed to allow people outside the house to sunbathe or visit public spaces

Boris Johnson tells Conservative MPs he wants to return to “near normal” in July

Boris Johnson told Conservative MPs he wanted to return to ‘near normal’ in July as he hailed British ‘common sense’ about the lockdown and announced £ 93 million to announce the opening of a research center to accelerate a vaccine against the coronavirus.

Speaking to 100 of his colleagues via video link, the Prime Minister said he would take “grandmother steps” to relax the rules, but only if the British complied with current lock-in measures. He also confirmed that discussions in the House of Commons would resume on June 2.

This comes when Mr. Johnson declares that the “strength” of the British people will allow them to survive the Covid-19 crisis and regain “the freedoms that are dear to them”.

He says that the epidemic has brought out “the best of humanity” and that “perseverance” and “common sense” of the public will allow the country to “progress” out of isolation and towards “missed normalcy” .

In his Sunday letter, Johnson also announced that an Oxfordshire research center will open one year ahead of schedule to try to speed up the development of a coronavirus vaccine.

A MP who listened to the video call told The Sun: “Boris told us that he was determined to get the country back to normal again before the end of July.

“But it was clear that everything depended on the fact that the country fulfilled the conditions that had been set to fight the virus.

“More importantly, it means lowering the infection rate – and this can only be achieved if we continue to follow the rules on social isolation to help stop its spread. “

Mr. Johnson’s exclusive article will be seen as an attempt to draw a line under the chaotic days of Westminster that followed his televised speech to the nation last Sunday, which left many people confused about the rules regarding dating. with friends and family.

The Prime Minister said today: “You can now spend as much time as you like outside, for example sitting and enjoying the fresh air, picnicking or sunbathing. You can meet another person from another home outside, provided you maintain a social distance. “

Cautious Britons started to pull out yesterday as UK traffic congestion data rose 3%. But the expected hustle and bustle of 15 million day trippers the first weekend since the lockout was partially lifted could not materialize as most decided to take advantage of the weather closer to home.

The lower-than-expected numbers could have been due to “coronaphobia” – the fear of traveling too far during the pandemic.

It is unclear whether the attitude to the water on Saturday will continue until today, or whether more courageous Britons will venture further.

South Downs National Park said people should “observe the three Rs with restraint, responsibility and respect”, and urged people to avoid popular areas and stand 2 meters away.

The Peak District National Trust said that although staff are “working hard” to welcome visitors again after weeks of restrictions amid the UK coronavirus crisis, they “are not quite ready yet” .

“Like this hare with erect ears, you have probably heard that the Peak District was busy this weekend!” We jump in and work hard to welcome you again, but we are not quite ready yet. Our main car parks in Longshaw and Ilam remain closed, ”said a tweet.

In Brighton, the local council asked people to stay away from its waterfront, with Carmen Appich – chair of the Equality, Communities and Culture Committee of the Brighton and Hove City Council – saying, “If thousands of people go to our city on a sunny day and don’t or are unable to maintain a safe physical distance due to overcrowding, this increases the risk of a Covid outbreak and puts everyone at risk. ‘

National Park Authority chief executive Richard Leafe said, “Right now, we are asking people not to rush into the Lake District – help protect our communities, the abysses will always be there when it happens.”

“When the time comes, we look forward to welcoming visitors to the Lake District and have worked with partners to put in place measures that will help keep people safe, such as new parking information and availability to help plan ahead. “

Their advice comes as the weather is expected to rise next week with peaks in the mid-1920s, raising fears that the crazy British lock-ups are rushing into the outdoors.

The Met Office has forecast highs of 20 ° C today, with temperatures expected to exceed those of Malibu, California on Wednesday when the mercury reaches 28 ° C in parts of Britain.

The paths of Hampstead Heath, London, were teeming with people who have been outside for the first weekend since the lifting of the lockout.

The roads of Hampstead Heath in London were full of people who have been outside for the first weekend since the lifting of the lockout.

A couple sitting on the cliff above the lighthouse at Beachy Head, near Eastbourne, following a relaxation of the lock rules

A couple sitting on the cliff above the Beachy Head lighthouse near Eastbourne following a loosening of the lock rules

Several groups walk along the cliff to the old Belle Tout lighthouse at Beachy Head near Eastbourne today

Several groups walk along the cliff to the former Belle Tout lighthouse at Beachy Head near Eastbourne today

Marlow Rowing Club members travel to the River Thames in Marlow, Buckinghamshire, following the lifting of certain lock restrictions this week

Marlow Rowing Club members travel to the River Thames in Marlow, Buckinghamshire, following the lifting of certain lock restrictions this week

Another rower in Chiswick took the Thames in a more unusual ship to enjoy the warm spring sun today

Another rower in Chiswick took the Thames in a more unusual ship to enjoy the warm spring sun today

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