Mortality rate continues to decline: UK announces 428 additional coronavirus deaths, for a total of 33,614

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The UK has announced an additional 428 deaths from the coronavirus, bringing the UK total to 33,614.

The number of cases increased to 233,151 when the Ministry of Health revealed that 3,446 more people had tested positive for the fatal infection in one day.

Today, a head of the World Health Organization warned that the United Kingdom was one of the first 10 countries to report cases of consistently elevated 24-hour coronavirus.

But the virus is not spreading as quickly in London as in the north-east of England, according to research published today.

Infection rates are lowest in London at 0.4 – and much higher at 0.8 in the north of England and the south west.

It appears hope has been raised that the lockdown may soon be eased further after British health officials finally approved an antibody test last night.

In other developments today:

  • Statistics have shown that April was the quietest month of all A&E across England;
  • London Mayor Sadiq Khan has been accused of blackmail after threatening to cut TFL services unless the Prime Minister accepts an emergency bailout of £ 2 billion by the end of the day;
  • Plans to reopen Boris Johnson’s school are in chaos as the senior science advisor admits that “unconfident” students cannot spread the coronavirus;
  • Nine out of ten UK companies close due to coronavirus believe they can restart within three weeks;
  • Jeremy Hunt today condemned the failure to deploy coronavirus tests to patients who have been released to nursing homes.

More than 2,000 people have died in Scotland after being tested positive for the coronavirus, said Nicola Sturgeon in his daily briefing, and 34 more have been announced in the past 24 hours.

Public Health Wales has announced 10 other deaths, for a total of 1,164 in the country, and Northern Ireland, 5 others, 454.

The remaining 379 deaths occurred in England, which includes all backgrounds.

Deaths have dropped very slowly in the past few weeks since their peak in mid-April, with fewer deaths reported daily in hospitals and care homes.

MOST SILENT MONTH OF APRIL FOR A&E AS PATIENTS AVOID HOSPITALS

April was the quietest month of all A&E across England, according to NHS statistics.

Only 916,581 emergency room visits were recorded in the month when the coronavirus crisis in Britain reached its peak – the first time in records, the number fell to less than a million.

The number of times people have sought emergency help has dropped by more than half in just two months as COVID-19 took over the nation.

People avoid hospitals for fear of adding extra pressure to the NHS or catching the virus while in hospital, doctors say.

Doctors warn that massive behavior change is a “ticking time bomb” that can lead to the death or death of more people in the near future because they have avoided treatment when they needed it.

There are also fears that people with cancer will fall victim to the overdue crisis, as urgent referrals for treatment have dropped 8% from last year.

Some 181,873 urgent referrals for cancer were made by general practitioners in England in March 2020, compared to 198,418 in March 2019.

Urgent referrals for breast cancer registered a larger decrease, from 17,137 in March 2019 to 12,411 in March 2020, a decrease of 28%.

NHS England, which released the figures, said the falls were “probably the result of the COVID-19 response” – an indication that people have moved away from A&E services due to the coronavirus epidemic.

The number of people admitted to hospital beds by A&E also fell sharply last month, down 39% from 535,226 in April 2019 to 326,581 in April 2020.

This is the lowest number reported for a calendar month since the start of the current records.

The government’s death tally only counts people who test positive but who have been rationing tests for months.

Data from the Office of National Statistics (ONS) includes all persons whose COVID-19 is mentioned on their death certificate, whether or not they have been tested.

The figures suggest that the actual number of coronavirus victims in Britain is probably over 44,000 and almost 40% higher than the statistics from the Department of Health.

Anticipation until the beginning of May shows that around 10,000 residents of nursing homes have died from coronavirus in Britain, which represents a quarter of all victims in the country.

The nursing home scandal continues to erupt as politicians rally and question the government’s response to the epidemic in the early days.

Former health secretary Jeremy Hunt today condemned the failure to deploy coronavirus tests to patients who have come out of nursing homes.

He insisted that checks on patients referred to nursing homes were “something that had to happen”.

The criticism was made after Sir Keir Starmer of the Labor party confronted Boris Johnson with the PMQ over the handling of the crisis yesterday.

NHS chiefs revealed that it was not until April 15 – after the peak of the epidemic in the United Kingdom – that sufficient capacity was in place to “systematically” test everyone discharged from the hospital.

Although they say that only a “very small number” of asymptomatic patients were sent to social care without being checked, the error has been compared to killing people directly in nursing homes where extremely vulnerable people live.

A cabinet minister admitted that the coronavirus crisis in nursing homes was “absolutely terrible”.

Community secretary Robert Jenrick told BBC Radio 5 Live: “I don’t deny that what’s going on in nursing homes is absolutely terrible. It’s a huge challenge. But we try to provide as much support as possible around the nursing homes. “

In a virtual briefing, the WHO Regional Director for Europe, Dr Hans Kluge, warned that the United Kingdom remains in the top 10 of countries reporting high cases on a single day.

He said: “In the European region, we are witnessing a general slowdown of the pandemic. But it remains a moment of sadness for many.

Research released today shows that coronavirus infects people twice as fast in the north east of England than in London.

Public Health England and Cambridge University found that the crucial reproductive rate, known as R, was only 0.4 in the capital.

But in North East and Yorkshire, the R – the average number of people infected with each COVID-19 patient – hovers around 0.8.

In the Midlands, the value would be 0.68, but in the Southwest, it would be around 0.76. The R is 0.71 in the east of England, 0.73 in the north west and 0.71 in the south east.

It is essential that the R number – which was between 3.5 and 4 at the start of the crisis – remains below 1, otherwise the epidemic will start to spread quickly as people infect others around them. faster pace.

London was once the epicenter of the UK coronavirus, and an estimated at least two million people have been infected there.

But yesterday it was revealed that eight of the 10 regions with the highest infection rates in Britain are currently in the north of England.

The small industrial town of Barrow-in-Furness, Cumbria, has an infection rate of 882 cases per 100,000 – almost double that of Brent (419), the most affected part of London.

Barrow’s infection rate is more than double that of Wales (365), triple that of England (244) and Scotland (251) and quadruple the rate recorded in Northern Ireland (220) .

Experts say the lower R in London may be due to the fact that there are more white-collar workers in London, so more employees have been able to work from home and isolate themselves from others.

Or it could be due to the fact that around 15% of the inhabitants of the capital already have the disease and have developed immunity, which would slow the spread of the virus.

Coronavirus infects people twice as fast in north-east England as it does in London, real-time tracking of breeding rating

Coronavirus infects people twice as fast in north-east England as in London, real-time tracking of breeding rating “R” shows

SADIQ KHAN ACCUSED OF BLACKMAILING FOR £ 2BLN BAILOUT

London Mayor Sadiq Khan has been charged with blackmailing Boris Johnson after threatening to cut metro, train and bus services unless the Prime Minister accepts an emergency bailout of $ 2 billion. books by the end of the day.

Khan said Transport for London would go bankrupt unless the government remits money to fill the coronavirus of the £ 4bn black hole left in its finances due to an 80% drop in revenues from tariffs, advertising and congestion charges.

TfL was already losing millions every month before the coronavirus and is in debt billions after Khan’s decision to freeze prices every year since his election in 2020. He has also been accused of being too flexible with militant transport unions and have the worst average strikes. file of any mayor.

Industry sources said TfL was losing £ 600m a month during the crisis and wanted £ 2bn in taxpayer-funded support even though bosses have £ 1.2bn in their pockets cash reserves.

Khan told LBC, “To be honest, today is the last day. Unless the government today gives us confirmation of the subsidy we need, the consequences could be quite serious and the implications for all of us will be enormous. The only way to balance the books is to cut services. “

Former Conservative Minister Stephen Hammond, MP for Wimbledon, told MailOnline: “An extraordinary remark. He threatens the health of Londoners by saying this kind of thing. We must restore London’s networks, the underground and the suburban network to full capacity. the mayor should focus on running as important a service as possible so that people can travel socially and as responsibly as possible. “

It supports preliminary data from the government-led study, which suggests that around 10 percent of Londoners tested positive for antibodies.

This means that around 900,000 people in the capital have developed some form of immunity against the virus.

It is estimated that almost 8,000 people died in London, which gives COVID-19 a death rate of 0.89% in London.

At the Downing Street press conference last night, Sir Patrick Vallance said that the rate of people with antibodies throughout Britain is around 4%.

Sir Patrick Vallance previously said that about 60 percent of the population must catch the virus to establish a national tolerance to stop the spread.

This comes when health leaders finally announced that they had found a reliable antibody test after several weeks of research.

Deployment plans for the revolutionary kits failed after the ministers failed to find a good enough test – but Swiss pharmaceutical giant Roche is said to have passed the test.

Experts hope these people could be immune to a new infection for up to three years. But currently, the evidence for the duration of immunity is unclear.

The ministers are currently in talks with Roche to purchase millions of kits, which officials today announced will be released to the NHS and social workers before being deployed more widely.

Questions were asked today about why Public Health England took so long to approve the test – 10 days after US regulators gave the go-ahead to the “revolutionary” kit.

A top scientist admits that it took “more time than it should” and another warning “every day counts” during a pandemic.

Meanwhile, on Britain’s second day back to work, there were more sinister scenes on the subway and buses this morning as people crowded on limited services.

Meanwhile, on Britain's second day back to work, there were more sinister scenes on the subway and buses this morning as people crowded on limited services

Meanwhile, on Britain’s second day back to work, there were more sinister scenes on the subway and buses this morning as people crowded on limited services

London Mayor Sadiq Khan (pictured at Downing Street in March) launched an extraordinary attack on Boris Johnson and also warned that he would cut metro, train and bus services unless the PM agreed an emergency rescue by the end of the day.

London Mayor Sadiq Khan (pictured at Downing Street in March) launched an extraordinary attack on Boris Johnson and also warned that he would cut metro, train and bus services unless the PM agreed an emergency rescue by the end of the day.

The sidewalks around London Bridge station were busy this morning as more and more people were heading to work this week

The sidewalks around London Bridge station were busy this morning as more and more people were heading to work this week

London mayor Sadiq Khan has finally announced that he will increase London underground services to 75% of normal on Monday.

But he has been accused of blackmailing Boris Johnson after threatening to cut metro, train and bus services, unless the Prime Minister accepts an emergency bailout of £ 2 billion by the end of the day.

Khan told LBC, “To be honest, today is the last day. Unless the government today gives us confirmation of the subsidy we need, the consequences could be quite serious and the implications for all of us will be enormous. The only way to balance the books is to cut services. “

Former Conservative Minister Stephen Hammond, MP for Wimbledon, told MailOnline: “An extraordinary remark. He threatens the health of Londoners by saying this kind of thing.

“We need to restore London’s networks, the underground and the suburban network to full capacity. the mayor should focus on running as important a service as possible so that people can travel socially and as responsibly as possible. “

There was also anger over Mr. Khan’s comments on LBC this morning, with a listener saying, “He’s trying to blackmail the government and yes, he’s ready to use the health and safety of key workers London as collateral for a bailout of its transportation service, “while another reviewer tweeted,” It’s blackmail – just like people are starting to go back to work. “

Khan said Transport for London would go bankrupt unless government remits money to fill coronavirus from £ 4 billion black hole left in finances due to 80% drop in revenue from tariffs, advertising and congestion charges.

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