“I was crying and praying”: coronavirus patient on ventilator is at home after receiving plasma

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He spent over a week on a ventilator for complications from coronavirus. Now a man from Maryland is at home recovering after being the first patient in the D.C. area to receive special plasma treatment.

Patrick Bright, 55, of Clinton, Maryland, was greeted at home on Friday by a parade of Pentagon federal police cruisers to greet him. Bright is a 15-year veteran federal officer at the Pentagon and is recovering from the coronavirus.

Patrick Bright, 55, of Clinton, Maryland, was greeted at home on Friday by a parade of Pentagon federal police cruisers to greet him. Bright is a 15-year veteran federal officer at the Pentagon and is recovering from the coronavirus.

Courtesy of MedStar Georgetown University Hospital

Patrick Bright returned home in Clinton, Maryland on Friday after becoming the first person in the Washington area to receive plasma therapy for the coronavirus.

Courtesy of MedStar Georgetown University Hospital

Patrick Bright is helped on a bench from the car. He was recently welcomed home from the hospital where he was the first person in the Washington area to receive plasma therapy for the coronavirus.

Courtesy of MedStar Georgetown University Hospital

Patrick Bright greets a parade of cruisers from the Pentagon Federal Police. Bright is a 15-year veteran federal officer at the Pentagon and is recovering from the coronavirus.

Courtesy of MedStar Georgetown University Hospital

He spent more than a week on a ventilator due to complications from the coronavirus. Now a man from Maryland is at home recovering after being the first patient in the D.C. area to receive special plasma treatment.

Doctors, nurses and other staff at MedStar Georgetown Hospital lined the entrance to the hospital to cheer on Patrick Bright, 55, of Clinton, Maryland, as he left.

He spent three weeks there after getting the coronavirus. For nine of those days, he was on a fan.

Her family was told to start planning her funeral.

“There have been times when I was in my hospital bed crying and just praying to God to get me through this,” said Bright.

But after receiving the first convalescent plasma therapy treatment for coronavirus in the D.C. area, given by Dr. Lambros Stamatakis of MedStar, Bright is now at home.

Staff at MedStar Georgetown Hospital received a video call with their family when they woke up.

“When I opened my eyes, the first thing I saw was my family and it gave me so much motivation,” said Bright.

On Friday, a parade of Pentagon federal police cruisers was posted outside his home to greet him. Bright is a 15-year veteran federal officer at the Pentagon.

“I feel humble and I feel so grateful,” said Bright.

He would like to return the favor and donate plasma once he is healthy enough. His wife has an appointment Tuesday to donate plasma.

“It can definitely save someone’s life,” said Bright.

He said he wanted to meet Stamatakis and the other doctors who helped save his life.

“I have a dream to thank one day the people who donated their plasma. This is something I really want to do in my future, “said Bright.

To be eligible to donate plasma to assist in the treatment of coronaviruses, the patient must have recovered from COVID-19 for at least 14 days and have laboratory confirmation.

MedStar Georgetown actively searches for and strongly encourages eligible plasma donors to donate by emailing [email protected]

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