Heathrow Airport to test thermal imaging cameras to spot passengers with coronavirus

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Heathrow Airpot is expected to test thermal imaging facial recognition cameras to identify passengers with coronavirus.

It is one of a series of measures the airport is taking to ensure passenger safety and will be tested over the next two weeks in Terminal 2.

The new safety procedures include UV sanitation, which could be used to quickly and effectively disinfect safety trays and facial recognition thermal screening technology to accurately track body temperature.

Britain’s largest airport will also test contactless security screening equipment to reduce person-to-person contact.

The aviation industry has been decimated by the global pandemic as countries put in place travel bans to control the spread of the disease.

Heathrow today released an image showing how thermal screening technology works. This involves using a camera detection system to monitor passenger temperatures

Heathrow today released an image showing how thermal screening technology works. This involves using a camera detection system to monitor passenger temperatures

Passenger numbers have dropped, causing serious financial problems for airlines, therefore the reopening and operation of airports is seen as key to reviving the industry.

Data from the trials and whether the measures are medically effective will be shared with government and industry and could lead to the creation of a common international standard for medical screening.

Temperature control technology involves the use of a camera sensing system to monitor passenger temperatures.

Initially, it will be used in the immigration halls of the airport. If deemed successful, the technology will then be used elsewhere in the airport.

Heathrow Airport to test UV light (photo) to disinfect safety platforms

Heathrow Airport to test UV light (photo) to disinfect safety platforms

UV sanitation would be used to disinfect the safety platforms while contactless security screening equipment would mean a reduction in person-to-person contact.

Heathrow CEO John Holland-Kaye said the government should help restart the aviation it described as “the cornerstone of the British economy”.

Holland-Kaye informed the House of Commons transportation committee today that the airport must test technologies that could form the basis of a common international standard for sanitary control at airports around the world.

This is to reduce the risk of contracting or transmitting the coronavirus while traveling.

Japanese company NEC is working on an authentication door to identify you so that your hand does not touch your face to remove the mask

Japanese company NEC is working on an authentication door to identify you so that your hand does not touch your face to remove the mask

Heathrow CEO John Holland-Kaye informed the House of Commons Transportation Committee today that the airport will test technology. On the picture:

Heathrow CEO John Holland-Kaye informed the House of Commons Transportation Committee today that the airport will test technologies. On the picture:

His appearance before the committee follows his requests to the government that Heathrow lead the global implementation of a common international standard to restore confidence in travel and increase passenger safety as countries travel. prepare to relax their respective locks.

“The United Kingdom has the third largest aviation sector in the world, providing the government with a platform to take the initiative to agree on a common international standard for aviation health with our major trading partners .

“This standard is essential to minimize the transmission of Covid-19 across borders, and the technology we are testing at Heathrow could be part of the solution,” he said.

The airport is already required to perform temperature checks by certain other countries.

This comes after the CEO of Gatwick Airport suggested travelers undergo mandatory virus testing 48 hours before departure after the lock was lifted, said the director of Britain’s second busiest airport.

A closed terminal at Heathrow Airport. Screening tests will be introduced in the next two weeks at Terminal 2 and will include facial recognition thermal screening technology that accurately tracks body temperature.

A closed terminal at Heathrow Airport. Screening tests will be introduced in the next two weeks at Terminal 2 and will include facial recognition thermal screening technology that accurately tracks body temperature.

Stewart Wingate also requested that passengers be required to carry “health passports” to prove that they are virus free and to wear masks on flights.

Wingate told The Times that ministers are studying whether tests, if any, should be done at airports or in communities.

“For example, would it be better for a passenger to arrive at the airport with some sort of certification stating” I have been checked in the past 48 hours and I don’t have a Covid “? “, Did he declare.

“These are the kinds of things that I am sure will be taken care of by the restart and recovery group. “

He added, “Passengers are traveling more and more with face covers and I’m sure this is something the government team will consider. “

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