Government WILL NOT Vary Lockout Rules Across the Country

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The government will not change the lifting of the coronavirus blocking by region, despite the widely varying rate of R infection in different regions of the United Kingdom, the Minister for Foreign Affairs confirmed today.

Speaking at the last Downing Street press conference, Alok Sharma said the government would stick to its national approach to the lockdown.

The Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy added that it was “too early” to discuss a gradual lifting of the lockout by region.

Different regions of the UK have a different R rate, which is used to indicate how quickly the virus spreads.

R rates calculated by the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine suggest that the East Midlands have the fastest spread of infection, with a rate between 0.8 and 1.2.

In contrast, London, which has been the hardest hit part of the UK, has a current R rate of 0.5-0.8, the lowest in the country.

Coronavirus cases in England and R infection rates in different parts of the country. The R measures the spread of the virus

Coronavirus cases in England and R infection rates in different parts of the country. The R measures the spread of the virus

Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy Alok Sharma said it was

Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy Alok Sharma said it was “too early” to discuss a gradual lifting of the region lock

This has led to speculation that different parts of the country may see different forms of foreclosure.

However, responding to a member of the public who asked whether a gradual lifting of the lockout would be better based on the R number of regional replicates of the virus, Mr. Sharma said it was “too early” and that the government was was committed to his national approach.

NHS England National Medical Director Stephen Powis added: “There will be variations between different parts of the country, which occurs naturally during epidemics.

“We see it, for example, during the flu season every winter.

“What is important in the future is that we will be increasingly able to measure R directly. “

He said the National Statistics Office released its first live test of a random sample of the population this week and that in the coming weeks we will have much better information about the directly measured R rate rather than on the rate of R which is derived from models and other observations ”.

“I think that will give us a clearer picture of the exact progression of the infection in different parts of the country,” he said.

Earlier today, new data showed that the incidence of the virus varies widely across the country.

Cumberland, Durham, Herefordshire and Norfolk now have 12 times more cases of coronavirus than counties like Devon, Cornwall and Dorset.

This comes after the data revealed that different parts of the UK have a different R infection rate which is used to determine the speed of spread of the coronavirus.

This comes after the data revealed that different parts of the UK have a different R infection rate which is used to determine the speed of spread of the coronavirus

The UK is currently at level four in the government's five-level path to loosen lock restrictions

The UK is currently at level four in the government’s five-level path to loosen lock restrictions

Different regions of the UK have a different level of R. The rate is calculated using confirmed hospital cases. (In the photo, British hospital patients with coronavirus by region)

Different regions of the UK have a different level of R. The rate is calculated using confirmed hospital cases. (In the photo, British hospital patients with coronavirus by region)

Edge Health, which provides data analysis for the NHS England, has used confirmed hospital cases to help calculate our R rates.

George Batchelor, co-founder of Edge Health, told the Sunday Telegraph: “As we see in countries like Singapore, the risk of a spate of new cases can arise even when the virus is under control.

“These outbreaks, like the increase in the number of cases in the north-west of England, tend to be localized. If detected early, they can more easily be checked. This requires a flexible regional response. “

The number of cases of coronavirus and the R are both used by the government to judge whether the restrictions should be relaxed.

If it is greater than 1, restrictions can be maintained or even tightened to try to stop the spread of the virus.

The government is using both the number of cases and “R” values ​​to judge the effectiveness of its social distancing measures, which were partially relaxed for the first time last week.

Data calculated by the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine give R as a range, since it is not scientifically possible to determine the rates with precision.

There is also a real-time delay of around 10 days in cases, which means that the latest R rates date back from the relaxation of restrictions last week.

According to the government’s official coronavirus strategy, social distancing measures may be relaxed in some regions before others.

Business Secretary Alok Sharma (pictured with NHS England Medical Director Professor Stephen Powis) announced an agreement between the University of Oxford and AstraZeneca

Business Secretary Alok Sharma (pictured with NHS England Medical Director Professor Stephen Powis) announced an agreement between the University of Oxford and AstraZeneca

Latest official Downing Street statistics show 170 more coronavirus deaths today - the lowest number since lockout began

Latest official Downing Street statistics have shown that there were 170 more coronavirus deaths today – the lowest number since lockout began

The document reads: “The restrictions may be adjusted by decentralized administrations at a different rate in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland because the level of infection – and therefore the risk – will be different.

“Similarly in England, the government can adjust restrictions in some areas before others: higher risk in Cornwall should not lead to disproportionate restrictions in Newcastle if the risk is lower.

He adds: “The government plans to target future restrictions more precisely than at present, as much as possible, for example by relaxing measures in low-risk parts of the country, but continuing them in high-risk areas when the data suggests this. ”

UK coronavirus death rate increases by 170, smallest increase since lockout started

Britain announced today 170 new coronavirus deaths on the first Sunday since the draconian lock-in measures were relaxed, bringing the total number of deaths in the UK to 34,636.

The latest daily figure is the lowest since March 24, but the numbers published on Sundays are generally smaller due to a delay in processing the weekend.

Speaking in the daily Downing Street briefing, the secretary of business, Alok Sharma, also confirmed that there were 3,142 other Covid-19 cases.

The drop in the number of deaths represents a drop of 36.8% compared to the figure of 269 last Sunday.

The numbers follow a tumultuous week for the government in which approval ratings fell sharply after Prime Minister Boris Johnson laid out his strategy for lifting the lockdowns.

In tonight’s briefing, which was delayed by 30 minutes, Sharma said that the clinical trial of a coronavirus vaccine at the University of Oxford is progressing well.

At a press conference in Downing Street today, Sharma also confirmed that Britain will be the first to have access to the coronavirus vaccine developed by the University of Oxford and the pharmaceutical giant AstraZeneca.

The business secretary also pledged an additional £ 84 million for the development of the project, which is expected to produce 30 million vaccines for the UK by September if successful.

Mr. Sharma said, “To finally defeat this disease, we need to find a safe and workable vaccine.

“Last month, I announced the creation of a new vaccine working group to coordinate the efforts of government, academia and industry in the crucial mission of finding a vaccine.

“I am very proud of the speed with which our scientists and researchers have come together in their efforts to develop a vaccine that will fight the coronavirus.”

He added: “The first clinical trial of the Oxford vaccine is progressing well, with all participants in the first phase having received their doses of vaccine on schedule earlier this week.

“The speed at which the University of Oxford designed and organized these complex trials is truly unprecedented.”

However, Sharma also said there was “no certainty” and that there may never be a developed vaccine capable of fighting the virus, which has now claimed the lives of 34,636 people in the Kingdom. -United.

As the UK begins to emerge from the lockdown, it has been revealed that pubs, cafes and restaurants with outdoor spaces could be allowed to reopen in a matter of weeks.

Companies holding a license for outdoor seating will receive advice from the government on how to reopen their doors on the market starting June 1 to move the economy and protect the hotel industry.

Nicholas Boys Smith, Founding Director of Create Streets, advised Robert Jenrick, Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, on the best way to enable companies to allow outdoor seating, The Telegraph reported.

However, as the country seeks to break out of isolation, Dr Hans Kluge, director of the Europe region of the World Health Organization (WHO), has announced that Europe should prepare for a second murderous wave. of coronavirus in winter.

Dr Hans Kluge, Director of the WHO European Region, announced that Europe should prepare for a second deadly wave of coronavirus in winter

Dr Hans Kluge, Director of the WHO European Region, announced that Europe should prepare for a second deadly wave of coronavirus in winter

Hand sanitizer is placed on a table at Speedo's Cafe in Bondi Beach, Sydney, after Australia begins allowing up to ten people inside restaurants

The hand sanitizer is placed on a table at the Speedo’s Cafe in Bondi Beach, Sydney, after Australia begins to allow up to ten people inside restaurants

The head of WHO said he was “very concerned” that an increase in infections would coincide with other seasonal diseases and added that it was time to strengthen health care systems across the continent by increasing the bed capacity.

He also warned that the time had come to “prepare, not celebrate” across Europe.

Talk to the Telegraph, he said: “Singapore and Japan understood very early on that this is not a time for celebration, it is a time for preparation.

“This is what the Scandinavian countries are doing – they are not ruling out a second wave, but they hope it will be localized and that they can jump in quickly. “

It comes as the UK announced today an additional 170 deaths from the coronavirus.

The latest figures, released on the first Sunday since the government’s easing of the lockdown, are the lowest since March 24.

Today, the UK announced 170 new deaths from coronavirus on the first Sunday since the drastic relaxation of lock-out measures

Today, the UK announced 170 new coronavirus deaths on the first Sunday since the drastic easing of lockdown measures

Sun seekers enjoy a drink on Brighton's seafront today as a number of beach bars begin to open

Sun seekers enjoy a drink on Brighton’s waterfront today as a number of beach bars begin to open

As temperatures started to rise, people were seen carrying take-out drinks to a pub on Broadway Market in east London today

As temperatures started to rise, people were seen carrying take-out drinks to a pub on Broadway Market in east London today

As pubs, cafes and restaurants seek to open up outdoor spaces, people with take-out drinks in a pub in London's Broadway market have been spotted strolling along the street

As pubs, cafes and restaurants seek to open up outdoor spaces, people with take-out drinks in a pub in London’s Broadway market have been spotted strolling along the street

Peter Brown, the director of Forest Road Brewing Co, pours a pint of beer from his vehicle to a customer during his delivery tour in Hackney, London

Peter Brown, the director of Forest Road Brewing Co, pours a pint of beer from his vehicle to a customer during his delivery tour in Hackney, London

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