Coronavirus: UK could be ‘practically back to normal’ by August

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The UK could have “returned to normal” in August, said a former head of the World Health Organization, after correctly predicting that the lockout would be eased in mid-May.

Former director of the WHO cancer program, Professor Karol Sikora, who sparked worship after the crisis, believes that life will be “practically back to normal” in August, if not sooner.

However, he added that “we must prepare for the worst but hope for the best”.

Professor Sikora, who has a doctorate in immunology, has become a beacon of hope for some, with thousands following his comments in the midst of Britain’s battle against the coronavirus.

He tweeted today: “I think by August things will be back to normal, maybe sooner. We always have to prepare for the worst, but hope for the best!

He added: “Some people laughed at my prediction in late March that we would start to return to normal by the second week of May – it was true! “

Former director of WHO cancer program Karol Sikora says life will be

Former director of WHO cancer program Karol Sikora says life will be “almost back to normal” by August

The professor compared the UK’s battle against the coronavirus to other European countries devastated by the pandemic, noting that many have now succeeded in relaxing the lock-in restrictions.

He said: “I have always hoped that by the summer our situation will have improved considerably.

“Our European friends have shown us the way – easing can be done safely.

“March and April were horrible, May is better, I hope that in June things will improve considerably.

The former WHO expert had previously suggested that the spread of the virus would slow down in May, with restrictions first easing in the middle of the month.

Boris Johnson announced the first relaxation of the lockout rules on May 10.

Sometimes it has been revealed that the UK coronavirus contact tracing program will finally be launched tomorrow because Health Secretary Matt Hancock has admitted that he will rely on people doing their “civic duty” »And voluntarily self-isolates to succeed.

The NHS Test and Trace system for England will see anyone who develops symptoms self-isolate and get tested, with close contact from those who test positive for the disease, and then told to quarantine for 14 days even if their test was negative and are not sick.

Pubs closed in Cambridge as UK foreclosure and social distancing measures continue

Pubs closed in Cambridge as UK foreclosure and social distancing measures continue

The former WHO expert had previously suggested that the spread of the virus would slow down in May, with restrictions first easing in the middle of the month.

The former WHO expert had previously suggested that the spread of the virus would slow down in May, with restrictions first easing in the middle of the month.

The system is launched without its centerpiece of the NHS contact tracking application, raising fears that without the new technology, the government could fight to fight the spread of the disease.

Experts immediately said the complexity of the program meant there could be “more than one point of failure”, while political opponents of the government said the ministers should never have largely given up on contact tracing .

Hancock said that joining self-isolation would be “voluntary at first” but could “quickly make it mandatory if that’s what it takes”.

He told the Downing Street daily press conference, “If you are contacted by NHS Test and Trace asking to isolate, you must. It’s your civic duty, so you unknowingly avoid spreading the virus and help break the chain of transmission.

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