Coronavirus UK: 36,870 deaths and 77 new deaths

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Britain announced 77 more coronavirus deaths today, bringing the official death toll to 36,870 as sun worshipers descended on parks and beaches today in the middle of an expected heat wave of 79F .

The NHS England has recorded 59 deaths from Covid-19 in hospitals. While Scotland has reported three deaths across the board, Wales has reported seven and Northern Ireland has reported eight.

The heads of the Ministry of Health, who publish the official daily report every afternoon, have not yet confirmed today’s final figure, which includes victims from all walks of life, such as nursing homes.

The preliminary count – often much lower than the final count – is calculated by adding all the individual counts from each of the sending nations.

Only 118 Covid-19 deaths were announced by officials yesterday, the lowest daily number since the lockdown was implemented on March 23 – the last time a double-digit daily death toll (74) has been registered. For comparison, the final figure announced last Monday was 160.

But the number of deaths published on Sunday and Monday is generally lower due to a delay in processing deaths over the weekend.

In other developments of the coronavirus crisis in Britain today:

  • Dominic Cummings stressed that he did not regret having traveled 260 miles to Durham during the confinement of the coronavirus, as he said, “I have behaved reasonably and lawfully” amid increasing calls dismiss the Prime Minister’s first assistant;
  • The British went down to parks and beaches in the middle of an expected 79 ° F heat wave, saying, “If Dominic Cummings can break the rules, so can we”;
  • An NHS hospital in the Somerset seaside hotspot in Weston-super-Mare has been forced to stop taking new patients due to a high number of cases of coronavirus;
  • Journalist Simon McCoy criticized his BBC colleague Gary Lineker for abusing his position after the host of the day accused the Prime Minister of lying;
  • Schools face a long journey before they can return to normal, said Education Secretary Gavin Williamson as he insisted that classes resume on June 1.

Beach goers soak up the sun by sunbathing on the beach and playing in the sea on a crowded beach today in Southend, Essex

Beach goers soak up the sun by sunbathing on the beach and playing in the sea on a crowded beach today in Southend, Essex

CUMMINGS admits that he went to BLUEBELL WOODS with his wife and child and visited Barnard Castle – but only to see if he was feeling better

Dominic Cummings insisted today that he does not regret having traveled 260 miles to Durham during the confinement of the coronavirus, as he stated “under all circumstances, I behaved reasonably and legal ”amid growing calls for the dismissal of PM’s aid.

Mr. Cummings said that his decision to go to town to stay on a property on his parents’ land was the result of “a very complicated and delicate situation” because he revealed that he had not asked for the permission from Boris Johnson to travel at the end of March.

The Vote Leave maverick has repeatedly refused to apologize for traveling despite accusations of “double standards” after the nation was asked to stay at home.

In an unprecedented speech in rose garden number 10 this afternoon, he said, “I don’t regret what I did … I think what I did was reasonable under the circumstances. “

He admitted that “reasonable people may very well disagree” with his conduct, but he was resolved to believe that he had acted appropriately.

The usually scruffy counselor wore an open-collared shirt while confirming reports that he had visited Barnard Castle on April 12 after his period of self-isolation with a coronavirus had ended.

But he insisted that he and his family had not toured the city 30 miles from Durham and had only ventured 15 meters from the car to the river bank. He said the purpose of the trip was to see if he was fit enough to make the trip back to London and.

Figures released today by the NHS England show that April 8 continues to have the highest number of hospital deaths in a single day, with a current total of 891.

Of the 59 new deaths recorded in English hospitals, 47 occurred during the weekend. Five took place on Friday, while the remaining seven died from the disease between May 16 and May 21.

Dominic Cummings may make a public statement this afternoon to directly respond to claims that he broke the lockdown rules on his way to Durham, Downing Street confirmed.

Mr. Cummings is expected to answer questions about his conduct, which plunged the government into a state of crisis and prompted a formal investigation.

The intervention came after one of the government’s science advisers warned that the “debacle” on the lockout trip had “fatally undermined” the country’s fight against the coronavirus.

Professor Stephen Reicher, who is a member of the government’s behavioral science advisory group that powers SAGE, said the result of “undermining the rules” will be that “more people will die”.

Johnson faces a furious reaction from ministers, Conservative MPs and even bishops after yesterday’s attempt to mount an extraordinary defense for Mr. Cummings, staking his reputation by trying to protect his help.

At a dramatic press conference in Downing Street last night, the Prime Minister said that Mr Cummings had acted “responsibly, lawfully and honestly” while making a controversial 260-mile trip from London to Durham during the lockout .

Johnson insisted that Cummings “followed every father’s gut” when he went to his parents’ farm after his wife developed symptoms of coronavirus. PM’s defense of his aid caused fury among the British.

Sun worshipers descended on parks and beaches today for the bank holiday in the midst of an expected heat wave of 79F, which could see parts of the country bathed in warmer temperatures than Athens, Nice and Barcelona.

Amy Louise Thomas, 20, and Elli Wilson, 20, enjoying hot public holidays on Formby Beach in Merseyside this morning

Amy Louise Thomas, 20, and Elli Wilson, 20, enjoying hot public holidays on Formby Beach in Merseyside this morning

Dominic Cummings: the acerbic “career psychopath” and the brain of Brexit are not afraid to say what he thinks – or to make enemies

Few of the allegedly hidden political operators have found themselves in the spotlight as often as Dominic Cummings, his calm but acerbic brain credited with winning the Brexit referendum.

After one of dozens of special advisers working for the Conservatives, he jumped into the spotlight overseeing Operation Vote Leave, which helped win the 2016 vote.

But it was the machinations of Downing Street during Boris Johnson’s 10 months of work that created a dramatic character rarely seen in British politics.

The allies regard him as a difficult anti-establishment consigliere at the PM, on a mission to shake up politics and the public service after years of stagnation.

The enemies – whom he seems to be en masse – seem to regard him as a pure Brexiteer puppet master similar to a modern Rasputin.

Much of this image appears to have been happily constructed by the “career psychopath” – a nickname given to him by David Cameron.

His stay at No10 saw him clash widely as he cemented a power base that culminated this week when the Prime Minister refused to dismiss him for breaking the lock despite clamor from the public, the press and of its own deputies.

He abandoned ministers and longtime staff to create a No10 wheel that has it at its center.

Most recently, he clashed with senior officials, including cabinet secretary Mark Sedwill in his quest to revolutionize Whitehall, and was seen as the man responsible for the ouster of Sajid Javid as chancellor in February.

Crowds have formed outside the Serpentine at Hyde Park in London, as the beaches of Sussex, Essex and Dorset quickly filled with visitors looking to take advantage of the dry and sunny conditions that should last all the day.

People in England are now allowed to travel on day trips, but must stay at least six feet from people outside their homes, which may not be possible in overcrowded areas.

In other developments today, an NHS hospital in the Somerset seaside hotspot in Weston-super-Mare has been forced to stop taking new patients due to a “high number” of coronavirus cases.

Weston General Hospital announced dramatically this morning that it could no longer admit admissions, including in A&E.

Health officials don’t know why the hospital had an influx of Covid-19 cases, with bosses warning that all hospitals have “frequent” changes in admissions.

But questions have been asked today about whether the blame can rest with crowds who have gathered in town to enjoy the sun since the lock was eased slightly.

Thousands of people traveled to the southwest and other coastal regions as soon as the government again authorized nationwide travel on May 13.

The mayor of Weston-super-Mare even admitted “you can’t rule it out”, when asked if dozens of Britons on the beach were to blame for the outbreak.

It is not the first time that hospitals have been overwhelmed by the coronavirus crisis, which began to get out of control in mid-March.

An NHS hospital in London was forced to report a “critical incident” at the start of the crisis after running out of intensive care beds.

Staff said other hospitals in the capital should have refused coronavirus patients because they lacked beds.

Education Secretary Gavin Williamson admitted today that schools face a “long journey” before they can return to normal, and insisted that classes resume on June 1 for health mentality of children.

He acknowledged that there would be “initial nervousness” on the part of parents over the release of their children after the closure for several months. But he said that in addition to the missing classes, he also lacked “social interaction” with their friends.

His emotional talk to parents came after Boris Johnson suggested that non-essential stores may soon reopen and that family “bubbles” be extended in further easing of foreclosure measures this week.

The draconian measures put in place on March 23 to limit the spread of the coronavirus were relaxed two weeks ago to allow households to meet someone else in an outdoor space, as long as they stay two meters away. one of the other.

Doctors have warned today that the spread of the virus in hospitals could be fueled by high

Doctors warned today that the spread of the virus in hospitals could be fueled by high “false negative” test results. Three out of 10 negative coronavirus tests may be wrong, said the Association of Hospital Consultants and Specialists (HCSA). Pictured: a home test kit sent by PHE

WESTON-SUPER-MARE NHS HOSPITAL CLOSES A&E AND STOPPING NEW PATIENTS

Weston General Hospital in Weston-super-Mare, Somerset, stopped taking new patients due to

Weston General Hospital in Weston-super-Mare, Somerset, stopped taking new patients due to “high” coronavirus

An NHS hospital in the Somerset seaside hotspot in Weston-super-Mare has been forced to stop taking new patients today due to a “high number” of coronavirus cases.

Weston General Hospital dramatically announced this morning that it can no longer admit patients, including E&E patients.

Health officials don’t know why the hospital had an influx of Covid-19 cases, with bosses warning that all hospitals have “frequent” changes in admissions.

But questions have been asked today about whether the blame can rest with crowds who have gathered in town to enjoy the sun since the lock was eased slightly.

Thousands of people traveled to the southwest and other coastal regions as soon as the government again authorized nationwide travel on May 13.

The mayor of Weston-super-Mare even admitted “you can’t rule it out”, when asked if dozens of Britons on the beach were to blame for the outbreak.

Furious Brits warned that May 8 Beach Victory Day celebrations “were going home to roost,” and one warned that a second wave was “breaking” in the southwest.

It is not the first time that hospitals have been overwhelmed by the coronavirus crisis, which began to get out of control in mid-March.

An NHS hospital in London was forced to report a “critical incident” at the start of the crisis after running out of intensive care beds.

Staff said other hospitals in the capital should have refused coronavirus patients because they lacked beds.

The British were also allowed to participate in an unlimited exercise, to use sports fields and outdoor facilities and to visit garden centers while pubs, restaurants and bars remained closed.

But the Prime Minister suggested last night that the measures could be relaxed again, after saying at the daily press conference at Downing Street that Britain was “able to move to the second stage” of its sheet. road to recovery.

Williamson reiterated the government’s mantra of creating a “protective bubble” around returning students when it appeared on BBC Breakfast.

He added: “Without the benefit of going to school, they are really missing, not just educationally. I’m sure we saw it with our own children, they spent so much time away from children their age, having these elements of social interaction.

To date, there are nearly 260,000 positive results for the COVID-19 test. But there are bound to be millions more Britons who have had the virus but have never been tested.

Doctors warned today that the spread of the virus in hospitals could be fueled by high “false negative” test results.

Three in 10 negative coronavirus tests may be wrong, said the Association of Hospital Consultants and Specialists (HCSA), which means that two to three people with Covid-19 may have a negative test.

This is dangerous because it means that patients can go outside and spread the virus to others, believing that they are free from the infection, and that hospital staff can return to work thinking they are virus free.

HCSA, which represents thousands of primary care physicians, said there was a “veil of secrecy” over the accuracy of swab tests and called for an end to the “wall of silence” on accuracy of tests from Public Health England (PHE).

PHE never disclosed the accuracy of its antigen tests, despite the publication of public articles on the accuracy of antibody tests.

In a letter to Duncan Selbie, PHE executive director Dr. Paul Donaldson, secretary general of the HCSA, expressed “deep concern and frustration” over the “systematic lack of information” on the reliability of his tests.

He said: “A wall of silence seems to have been erected around the issue, with only one occasional claim or clue emerging regarding the testing regime.

“In addition, statements by PHE officials and others place the incidence of false negatives at between 20 and 30 percent.

IT WILL BE A “LONG JOURNEY” TO GIVE SCHOOLS BACK TO NORMAL, SAYS GAVIN WILLIAMSON

Schools must face a “long journey” before they can return to normal, admitted Gavin Williamson today, stressing that classes must resume on June 1 for children’s mental health.

The education secretary admitted that there would be “initial nervousness” on the part of parents to release their children from the long period of arrest.

But he said that in addition to the missing classes, he also lacked “social interaction” with their friends.

His emotional talk to parents came after Boris Johnson suggested that non-essential stores may soon reopen and that family “bubbles” be extended in further easing of foreclosure measures this week.

Williamson reiterated the government’s mantra of creating a “protective bubble” around returning students when it appeared on BBC Breakfast.

He added: “Without the benefit of going to school, they are really missing, not just educationally.

“I’m sure we saw it with our own children, they spent so much time away from children their age, having these elements of social interaction.

He added, “I have seen it in my own children, how much they miss it. We cannot be in a situation where we are spending months and months where children are simply going to lack education.

“The coronavirus could be with us a year or more. If we do not recover them, the delays will be tragic and we must take these prudent and temporary first steps.

The draconian measures put in place on March 23 to limit the spread of the coronavirus were relaxed two weeks ago to allow households to meet someone else in an outdoor space, as long as they stay two meters away. one of the other.

The British were also allowed to participate in an unlimited exercise, to use sports fields and outdoor facilities and to visit garden centers while pubs, restaurants and bars remained closed.

But the Prime Minister suggested last night that the measures could be relaxed again, after saying at the daily press conference in Downing Street that Britain was “able to move to step 2” of its sheet of road for the recovery.

“If confirmed, this is a worrying rate which raises fears that many infected people, possibly without symptoms, will be transmitted able to return to health establishments where they will transmit Sars-CoV-2 to their colleagues and patients.

“If the risk of false negative results is as high as expected, then in our opinion, without repeating PCR tests to confirm a negative result, staff should not be asked to return to a clinical environment where they could transmit SARS -CoV-2 to vulnerable patients and colleagues.

“This could become a particularly acute problem as the NHS plans to significantly increase its non-Covid work and the broader lock-in measures are relaxed. “

Prime Minister Boris Johnson warned that the acquisition of COVID-19 at the hospital had caused an “epidemic” of deaths during the pandemic.

NHS bosses say that up to one-fifth of Covid-19 patients in several hospitals have contracted the disease while they were already being treated for another disease.

PHE uses polymerase chain reaction (PCR) tests, which are a form of antigen testing to see if anyone has the virus, SARS-CoV-2, at any given time.

These viral RNA tests use samples taken from the throat, mouth, or nose of a suspect patient with a tampon.

The accuracy of viral RNA samples depends almost entirely on the quality of the sample and when the sample is taken during the course of the disease, which experts say will vary widely.

Research from the University of Bristol has found that between 2% and 29% of COVID-19 tests produce false negatives.

And a review of five studies, by Public Health Madrid, found that the Covid-19 swab produced false negative results the first time in 29% of cases.

Experts say the false negatives will be the result of an incorrect swab, as there will be differences in how doctors – and those who take a home test – do.

The preferred – and most accurate, doctors say – method is for qualified doctors to take a nasopharyngeal tampon because it collects the most concentrated sample.

But the test is so uncomfortable that it has been described as “being stabbed in the brain.” This can cause nausea and nosebleeds.

Photos of transit centers show healthcare workers opting for the less invasive option of a nose or throat sample.

Following the letter, Dr. Nick Phin, Director of Incidents at PHE, said, “The testing system is built on a solid foundation using the latest scientific evidence and advice.

“The various tests used were deemed to comply with the manufacturers’ specifications.”

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