Coronavirus Italy: less than 1,000 patients in intensive care

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Less than 1,000 patients left in intensive care units in Italy as the nation continues to control the spread of the virus which claimed the lives of 30,739 people in the country.

Figures released by the Civil Defense Agency show that there were 999 people in intensive care on Monday, down from 1,027 on Sunday.

The latest figures, which also show that deaths in Italy have increased by 179 today, come as the country is putting in place measures to ease measures of social distancing and enter the “phase two” lockdown.

The total number of deaths since the outbreak of the epidemic on February 21, which now stands at 30,739, is the third highest in the world after those in the United States and the United Kingdom.

Italy has seen a decrease in the number of patients it treats for a coronavirus as it begins to break out of the lockout. Pictured: Civitanova Marche Hospital, Italy

Italy has seen a decrease in the number of patients it treats for a coronavirus as it begins to emerge from the lockout. Pictured: Civitanova Marche Hospital, Italy

The number of coronavirus deaths has slowly declined, with figures showing that 30,739 people have now died from the disease.

The number of coronavirus deaths has slowly declined, with figures showing that 30,739 people have now died from the disease.

Figures from health officials have also shown a decline in the number of Covid-19 cases

Figures from health officials have also shown a decline in the number of Covid-19 cases

The total number of confirmed cases was 219,814, the fifth highest global count after those from the United States, Spain, Great Britain and Russia.

People registered as carriers of the disease fell to 82,488 from 83,324 the day before.

Of the people originally infected, 106,587 were declared cured compared to 105,186 the day before.

The figures come as the daily count of new cases in Italy fell to 744 from 802 on Sunday.

The agency said 1.702 million people had been tested for the virus against 1.676 million on Sunday, out of a population of around 60 million.

Italian authorities, who registered 243 deaths, said on Friday that many more people in the country would have died from the infection at home or in retirement homes without being diagnosed.

People cross Naples waterfront as Italian government introduces phase 2 foreclosure

People cross Naples waterfront as Italian government introduces phase 2 foreclosure

Resident cycle and jogging along Via dei Fori Imperiali in central Rome this week as the number of coronavirus cases continues to drop

Resident cycle and jogging along Via dei Fori Imperiali in central Rome this week as the number of coronavirus cases continues to drop

People wear masks as they walk by the sea in Livorno, Italy, as government begins to loosen lockdown measures

People wear masks as they walk by the sea in Livorno, Italy, as government begins to loosen lockdown measures

Lombardy, in the north of the country, continues to be the hardest hit region, accounting for almost half of the latest cases registered on Friday.

Italians were seen last Saturday flocking to the country’s many parks as the government took steps to break out of the lockout and enter the “phase two” lockout.

The public came out of their homes across the country during phase two of the lockout, with people taking their bikes around Piazza Venezia and Via dei Fori Imperiali in the capital.

Previously, Italians were only allowed to venture a few hundred yards from their door to buy essentials or to exercise.

The scenes occurred when Italian scientists also revealed their intention to test a vaccine, developed by Rome-based Takis Biotec, on humans after declaring that their vaccine was the “first in the world” to neutralize the virus.

Takis CEO Luigi Aurisicchio said the Italian team is planning to start testing in the fall, as scientists rush to stop the pandemic.

He said: “To our knowledge, we are so far the first in the world to demonstrate neutralization of the coronavirus by a vaccine.

Prime Minister Boris Johnson on Sunday urged the country to return to work and present its provisional three-step “exit plan” in the fight against coronaviruses.

In a televised address on Downing Street, the Prime Minister paid tribute to the British “sacrifice” to fight the deadly disease and asked those who could not work from home to return to work.

He added that people can exercise as often as they like and sunbathe in the parks as long as they follow the rules of social distancing.

New Italian rules for “phase two” foreclosure

Italy has now started to lift its lockout of almost two months.

Previously, Italians were only allowed to venture a few hundred yards from their door to exercise or shop.

People could face interrogation, fines and even prison terms if found outside without just cause.

The restrictions are starting to be relaxed and Italians are allowed to leave for:

JOB: Manufacturing and construction resumed on May 4, allowing approximately 4.4 million people to return to work, but many businesses are still closed.

STORES: Most non-essential stores are still closed. However, a small selection including bookstores and children’s clothing stores has opened for testing during the lockout, and bicycle vendors are expected to be added to this list “very soon”.

BARS AND RESTAURANTS: Can now only open for takeout services.

FAMILY MEMBERS MEETING: People are now allowed to leave their homes to “visit relatives and other relatives”, but not friends. They will have to wear masks and “large family gatherings” are not allowed.

TRIP: People are still prohibited from traveling outside the region where they live. There is an exception for students and workers who were stranded in another region at the start of isolation if they now want to return home. The regional authorities are responsible for ensuring social distancing in public transport.

PARKS AND EXERCISES: Parks have reopened for jogging and exercise, although children’s play areas are still closed. People are allowed to drive somewhere to exercise.

THE UNIVERSITIES: May organize exams and diploma ceremonies if social distance is respected. The laboratories can also reopen.

FUNERAL: Up to 15 mourners are now allowed to assemble for a funeral, but must wear masks.

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