Women may be at higher risk of being diagnosed with breast cancer if they don’t eat enough fiber

0
92


Research suggests that millions of women may be at higher risk of developing breast cancer later in life because they don’t get enough fiber from their diet.

Only 9 percent of adults in Britain eat the recommended levels of fiber.

Experts have long warned that the lack of this vital nutrient increases the risk of bowel cancer. But now a major study from Harvard University has revealed that it is also linked to breast cancer.

The researchers combined the results of previous studies to create a “meta-analysis”. The results, published today in the medical journal Cancer, show that women with high fiber intake are 8% less likely to develop breast cancer than those with the lowest intake. Researchers believe that fibers protect against breast cancer by controlling blood sugar and improving insulin sensitivity.

Study leader Dr. Maryam Farvid of the Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health said,

Study leader Dr. Maryam Farvid of the Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health said, “Our study contributes to evidence that lifestyle factors, such as editable eating practices, can affect the risk of breast cancer “

Cancer cells thrive on sugar – uncontrolled blood sugar levels therefore help stimulate their growth. Fiber could also reduce the circulation levels of the hormone estrogen – another driver of breast cancer – by increasing the good bacteria in the gut, which breaks it down.

Fiber is made from the materials that structure most vegetables – cellulose, lignin and pectin. It is found in fruits and vegetables and foods rich in carbohydrates, such as wholemeal bread, pasta and legumes.

It keeps the digestive system in good working order and helps us to feel full, while protecting against heart disease and diabetes.

In Britain, it is advisable to consume 30 g of fiber per day, but very few people achieve this goal, mainly because the food production processes eliminate a large part of the fiber.

White bread, pasta and rice, for example, have lower levels than the full and brown versions.

Eating fruits and vegetables is a very simple way to increase fiber intake, said Dr. Farvid

Eating fruits and vegetables is a very simple way to increase fiber intake, said Dr. Farvid

An increase in trends in low-carbohydrate and gluten-free diets is also believed to cause low fiber consumption. Study leader Dr. Maryam Farvid of the Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health said, “Our study contributes to evidence that lifestyle factors, such as modifiable eating habits, can affect the risk of breast cancer. “

Eating fruits and vegetables is a very simple way to increase fiber intake, said Dr. Farvid. “Whole grains, legumes, seeds and nuts are other great sources,” she added.

“It has also been found that an increase in the consumption of total fiber from various sources was associated with an increase in food quality and the intake of vitamins, minerals and other bioactive compounds which may be associated with a lower risk. breast cancer. “

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here