Veterinarians’ call to pet owners to take a “common sense approach” during the coronavirus crisis

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A veterinarian urged pet owners to take a “common sense approach” with their four-legged friends during the coronavirus crisis.

Two research projects are underway at the University of Adelaide to determine whether pets can be biologically transmitted after several dogs and cats outside Australia have tested positive for COVID-19.

But pet owners have been reassured that the virus is spread by human-to-human transmission, not by pets such as dogs or cats.

Dr. Anne Fawcett of the University of Sydney School of Veterinary Science urged pet owners to treat their pets the same as other humans by practicing good hand hygiene.

Australians are requested not to pet anyone unless they have washed their hands first and after. In the photo, Sydneysiders and a four-legged friend receive their daily dose of fresh air on Saturday

Australians are requested not to pet anyone unless they have washed their hands first and after. In the photo, Sydneysiders and a four-legged friend receive their daily dose of fresh air on Saturday

“You should wash your hands before and after touching an animal,” said Dr. Fawcett to the Daily Mail Australia.

“We are not asking pet owners to do anything but be vigilant. “

“My advice is to use common sense and stay calm. We must remember that there are very few reports of viruses involving animals. “

Dr. Fawcett said it is safe to take a dog for a public walk, but advised people not to pet someone else’s pet unless you wash your hands first and after.

“Yes, it is still safe to take the dog for a walk, but social distance must be maintained,” she said.

Pet owners must take a

Pet owners should take a “common sense approach” to their cats and dogs. In the photo, a cat from the RSPCA shelter in Sydney needs a new home

Pet owners are encouraged to treat their four-legged friends as a family member.

“We were all told to isolate ourselves in a family bubble. My advice would be to consider your pets as part of this family bubble, ”said Dr. Fawcett.

Close contact such as kissing or burying the face in your pet’s fur is not recommended.

If you or another family member has been struck by the virus, minimal contact with pets is encouraged as much as possible.

“Ask someone to take care of the animal if you can, just as you would isolate yourself from other family members,” said Dr. Fawcett.

She urged pet owners anxious to contact them to contact their veterinarian, who has been declared an essential service so that they can remain open while the coronavirus is locked.

But veterinarians have changed the way they do business to avoid the risk of human-to-human transmission.

“My advice is to call your vet in advance and wait outside while your pet is examined by the vet,” she said.

A general practitioner has assured that you will not get coronavirus from your pets. In the photo, a woman takes her dogs for a walk along the beach at the NSW-Queensland border this week

A general practitioner has assured that you will not get coronavirus from your pets. In the photo, a woman takes her dogs for a walk along the beach at the NSW-Queensland border this week

Globally, two cats and two dogs have tested positive.

“The small number of animals that have tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 are not involved in the spread of infection in humans,” said Professor Jacqui Norris of the School of Veterinary Sciences at the University of Sydney at the Herald Sun.

“Worldwide, two cats and two dogs have tested positive for SARS-CoV-2. These animals lived with infected human owners and the timing of the positive result demonstrates a human-to-animal transfer. The virus culture on these pets was negative, which means that no active virus was present. “

Sydney general practitioner Ginni Mansberg also addressed her concerns when she appeared on Channel Seven’s Sunrise on Wednesday for a question and answer session on the killer virus.

“We have no case where humans get coronavirus from their pets. We have a few pets who got it from the owners, but not the other way around, “said Dr. Mansberg.

The RSPCA reiterated claims that there was no evidence to suggest that coronavirus in animals could be transmitted to humans.

“There are many types of coronaviruses. News articles reporting that coronaviruses have been detected in dogs and cats have generally referred to significantly different types of virus than that which causes human disease COVID-19, “says its website.

Veterinarians have assured that it is always safe to take your dog for a walk in public. In the photo, a dog at the RSCPA shelter in Sydney

Veterinarians have assured that it is always safe to take your dog for a walk in public. In the photo, a dog at the RSCPA shelter in Sydney

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