UK reports more coronavirus deaths in hospitals

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Britain today announced 473 additional coronavirus deaths in hospitals, bringing the official death toll in the UK to 26,570.

NHS England has reported 391 COVID-19 casualties, while Scotland has registered 60 and Wales has registered 22. Northern Ireland has yet to report.

The health ministry said the official tally, which is expected to be even higher and include deaths outside of hospitals, will be released later this afternoon.

Amid fears that thousands of victims might be missed, the ministers bowed to increasing pressure to include the deaths of COVID-19 in nursing homes in the daily update.

Officials yesterday – the first day of the new registration system – added an additional 3,811 deaths to the count. The revised count saw Britain rise to third place in the global COVID-19 death chart, which means that the number of deaths per day in Britain exceeded 1,000 nine times in April.

But the best statisticians argued that the recount was still short to thousands because only the British who tested positive for the virus were included. A leading expert said the actual number would be more than 30,000.

In other developments of the coronavirus crisis today:

  • Boris Johnson is about to signal that the lockdown will remain in effect until June, when he assembles cabinet to eliminate an “exit strategy”;
  • A report warned that London’s transportation system could be paralyzed when the UK eased foreclosure measures after TfL put 7,000 workers on leave;
  • Ministers admitted that the government would “probably” fail Matt Hancock’s goal of 100,000 tests a day;
  • Poll found that two-thirds of the public believe the government intervened too late in enforcing the foreclosure;
  • New questions were raised about the SAGE group amid claims that it had been influenced by politicians and senior officials;
  • NHS fundraising hero Tom Moore was promoted to colonel and honored in an RAF air parade to mark his 100th birthday;
  • Top surgeons have warned that thousands of people would die from COVID-19 if Britain’s strict lockout was lifted at this point.

Slowly increasing traffic: At peak hours, at 8 a.m., traffic was up the same day last week but down yesterday. Congestion was 50% below average today - almost as high as the busiest day on Lockout Monday, when it was 49% below average. It was a 2% increase from last week

Slowly increasing traffic: At peak hours, at 8 a.m., traffic was up the same day last week but down yesterday. Congestion was 50% below average today – almost as high as the busiest day on lockdown Monday, when it was 49% below average. It was a 2% increase from last week

London: Apple's mobility data for London also paint a similar picture. Driving increased 2% this week and walking increased 8% on weekends in sunny weather, but dropped when the rain fell on Monday

London: Apple’s London mobility data also paint a similar picture. Driving increased 2% this week and walking increased 8% on weekends in sunny weather, but dropped when the rain fell on Monday

The NHS England revealed today that the total number of hospital deaths across England has reached another milestone of 20,137.

Figures from the Department of Health show that the actual number of deaths in England is 23,550, which means that at least 3,413 deaths have occurred outside hospitals.

One 15-year-old boy was among the 391 new victims. Officials said they had an underlying health problem, but it was unclear.

Wales recorded 22 more deaths, bringing its total number to 908. Scotland has announced 60 more victims and its death toll is now 1,475.

Northern Ireland has yet to report its number today, but its official tally yesterday was 338.

Lockdown until June: Nicola Sturgeon warns that it is not “safe” to reduce restrictions saying traffic has ALREADY increased by 10% in some places – as Boris Johnson prepares to dash hopes an “exit plan”

Boris Johnson is about to report that the lockdown will remain in effect until June today as he delivers his first briefing on Downing Street since he got sick – Nicola Sturgeon jumping the gun saying he is not yet “safe” to relieve curbs.

After presiding over Cabinet this morning, the Prime Minister is expected to dash hopes of an imminent end to the draconian restrictions that are crippling the economy, stressing that allowing the deadly disease to rage again would do more damage.

Johnson will put the “R” number – the virus’s reproductive rate – at the heart of the battle, saying he will not act to let it exceed one, which means it is increasing.

Government sources said he would also challenge calls to treat the public as “adults”, specifying ways to facilitate the lockdown, saying it was “too soon”.

But Scottish Prime Minister Nicola Sturgeon, at an information meeting in Edinburgh today, said it would be “too early” when the official review takes place next week to lift the restrictions “so significant ”. “The margins we have to make sure the virus doesn’t take off are really very tight,” she said.

Sturgeon expressed concern that people were already starting to flout social distancing rules – revealing that traffic had increased by 10% last week in parts of Scotland.

Despite the hard line in public, frantic work continues behind the scenes to develop an “exit plan”. Island communities with controllable transport links should be used to test ways to loosen restrictions while stepping up community testing. The Isle of Wight will be among the first pilot sites.

However, the authorities have strongly downplayed claims that areas like Cornwall could be targeted by specific measures.

Johnson’s appearance at tonight’s press conference will be his first since the laying of charges at Downing Street on Monday, and will take place less than 36 hours after his fiancée Carrie Symonds gave birth to their son. The Prime Minister postponed his paternity leave until later this year as the country struggles to fight the coronavirus epidemic.

Boris Johnson is back at Downing Street Hospital after the birth of his baby with partner Carrie Symonds yesterday

Boris Johnson is back at Downing Street Hospital after the birth of his baby with partner Carrie Symonds yesterday

Robert Buckland

Nicola Sturgeon

Justice Secretary Robert Buckland (left) said in interviews this morning that the mood among ministers was “extremely cautious”, endorsing a strong hint from Nicola Sturgeon (right at a briefing in Edinburgh today) that restrictions will be extended for an additional three weeks when an official exam takes place on May 7

Chief Physician Chris Whitty was at Downing Street for the Cabinet meeting this morning

Chief Physician Chris Whitty was at Downing Street for the Cabinet meeting this morning

Ministers finally admit that they WILL MISS Matt Hancock’s target of 100,000 tests a day TODAY, while NHS leaders say the figure is “red herring”

Ministers admitted that they should miss Matt Hancock’s target for coronavirus testing today – when experts call him “red herring” that hampered the response.

Amid criticism that the UK is lagging behind countries like South Korea and Germany, the Secretary of Health dramatically promised on April 2 that 100,000 checks a day would be made by then the end of the month.

But while daily capacity now exceeds 70,000, the number of actual tests is still barely half the target.

Justice Secretary Robert Buckland conceded this morning that the goal was “likely” to be missed, blaming the government for starting from a “low base” and saying he now hoped the numbers would hit the brand in the coming days.

NHS providers, who represent health service trusts, launched a scathing attack on Hancock’s handling of the situation, claiming that the pressure to reach the figure was a “distraction” and led to expansion chaotic.

At the briefing in Edinburgh today, Sturgeon said: “It could very well be too early, even this time next week, significantly to safely lift the current restrictions. “

She said overall traffic in Scotland has increased by 5% over the past week, although it is still less than a third of the levels before the lockout.

“In some of our cities and roads, traffic was 10% higher than the week before,” she said.

She asked people to think about whether they were now “a little more active” than they were when the lockout started.

“You might think that it is only you who are taking an additional trip, and it is only one trip. And you might feel like you deserve it after weeks of restraint. Trust me, I really understand all of this.

“But it all adds up. And if everyone starts to calm down, the virus will take off quickly and this will have devastating consequences for all of us.

Justice Secretary Robert Buckland said in interviews this morning that the atmosphere among the ministers was “extremely cautious.”

He said: “I think the common thread between governments is one of extreme caution following the testimony of the Sage committee, ensuring that we do not do anything prematurely that could risk a second spike. It would be a disaster.

He told BBC Radio 4 Today: “I think in government there is already a lot of work going on on what the future will look like – I think it would be a failure on duty if we didn’t. this.

“It is certain that in my service I am now looking towards the medium term what summer and autumn will look like in the penitentiary and judicial system. We have to start this work, in fact the work is already underway.

“This does not mean, of course, that we are suddenly going to enter a new phase – we have to be absolutely sure that the five tests that were established a few weeks ago are going to be met, and in particular the need to avoid this second, or even the third peak of the disease, being obvious to me, both in terms of health and economic well-being. “

A source # 10 said of Mr. Johnson’s message: “It will depend a lot on how well we pass our five tests to break out of the lockdown, the main one being to make sure we don’t risk another increase exponential infections.

“It is still too early to give details on what a loosening of the lock might look like. “

Data released yesterday showed that Britain has one of the worst coronavirus mortality rates in the world, better than Spain and Belgium per capita.

Revised figures from the UK, including deaths outside hospitals, have shown that there have been nine days when the death toll exceeded 1,000 – from April 7 to April 24.

London’s transport network could not regain its “FOUR WEEKS” capacity if the lock was relaxed

London’s transportation system could be brought to a standstill when the UK eases foreclosure measures after TfL has put 7,000 workers on leave, an austere report said today.

The briefing to emergency planners, seen by the BBC, warns that the metro will be “quickly submerged” if social distance is maintained, and says that the police would be under pressure if necessary to maintain crowd control.

The London transport system would need four weeks to prepare for the new challenges, according to the “Lockdown Release” briefing.

The London Strategic Co-ordination Group (SCG) document said that the metro and bus capacity would be reduced to 15% and 12% respectively from normal levels, if a space of two meters between passengers was respected.

Militant leaders of the RMT union presented another obstacle last week, saying there was “no chance” that their workers would return without proper PPE – while London Mayor Sadiq Khan urged Londoners to wear masks when traveling.

Britain is starting to see a return to normalcy as traffic returns to the country’s highways – but the government insists it does not want to lift the foreclosure measures too soon while the country is still facing a “dangerous time” in the coronavirus pandemic.

Johnson chaired the daily morning coronavirus meeting, followed by his political cabinet and cabinet meetings, said the Prime Minister’s official spokesperson.

The chief medical officer, Professor Chris Whitty, and the chief scientific adviser, Sir Patrick Vallance, briefed the ministers on the response to date to the coronavirus and progress made to slow the spread of the disease.

The Secretaries of State then informed their colleagues of the work accomplished by their services.

The Prime Minister has given another signal that there is little chance of a release before June.

He said at a briefing in Westminster, “I think we will have to wait for the exam to take place and I don’t think it is wise for me to get ahead of it.

“What you’ve obviously heard from Chris Whitty is that it’s a disease that’s going to exist for a considerable time – he said we have to be realistic, we’re going to have to do a lot for a long period of time .

The spokesperson added, “Let’s not prejudge the review, but, as the Prime Minister himself said, the worst thing we can do is release social distancing too soon and spoil all the progress that has been made thanks to the hard work and sacrifice of the British public.

Dominic Raab highlighted the dangers of premature easing, noting that Germany, while laudably containing the virus, has now seen an increase in transmission since the reopening.

“Chancellor Merkel has made it clear that they may need a second lock-up in Germany if the infection rate continues to rise,” said the Foreign Minister during the Downing Street briefing.

Despite difficult public messages, there is evidence of broader action to make the economy more operational.

DIY stores, fast food chains, cafes and garden centers have intensified their activities.

The ministers also asked the councils to reopen the garbage cans.

Ministers are working on a series of workplace guides that detail what they might look like after the lock is released.

Business Secretary Alok Sharma asked officials to provide advice on how to safely manage a gradual return to work for seven different types of workplaces, including offices, factories and construction sites .

Companies will be invited to close canteens and other communal spaces, as well as to operate new ways of working to allow social distancing and limit the pressure on public transport during rush hour.

Office staff will likely be encouraged to continue working from home as much as possible.

Deputy medical director Jonathan Van-Tam said a partial reopening of the schools was “in the mix” but that it was “premature” to expect early action given the difficulty of social distancing in them.

A Whitehall source said that the triennial review of the foreclosures, scheduled for May 7, would only involve modest changes at best.

“We are looking into whether we can undo the top button and make things more comfortable in one or two places for the economy,” added the source. “But any idea of ​​a generalized lifting is completely false. “

Masked passengers are seen crowding on a platform at Canning Town Underground station in London this morning

Masked passengers are seen crowding on a platform at Canning Town Underground station in London this morning

Dominic Raab

Matt Hancock

Dominic Raab (left) and Matt Hancock were among those physically present in Cabinet today – other ministers who chose to attend the meeting

British roads are becoming significantly more crowded, raising fears that the country will break free from the lockout against government advice. In the photo, the A102 in Greenwich, south-east London, this morning

British roads are getting significantly busier, raising fears that the country will break free from the lockout against government advice. In the photo, the A102 in Greenwich, south-east London, this morning

Surgeons warn PM not to use NHS as “punchbag” to stop economic damage

Top surgeons have warned that thousands of people would die from Covid-19 if Britain’s strict lockout was lifted at this point.

The Royal College of Surgeons has warned Prime Minister Boris Johnson against using the NHS as “an economic punching bag” as he works on his plan to bring Britain back to normal.

The RCS stated that the lock could not be relaxed at this stage because health workers were not tested and the PPE available was insufficient for primary care physicians.

Professor Neil Mortensen, President-elect of RCS, told The Daily Telegraph: “Just because the NHS has not been outdated so far does not mean that the government can use health services as its punching bag. economic.

“It was a very close thing, and to use Boris Johnson’s own words,” we have started to fight it “, but the virus is certainly not yet defeated. “

The Government’s Scientific Emergency Advisory Group will release new evidence to ministers in the coming days, but it is expected that lifting many restrictions will immediately increase the rate of infection.

Government source said Mr. Johnson would be clair very clear that we will not do anything that could risk [this]… Because then you are back with an exponential spread of the virus and the risk of a second lockout. “

By further urging the Prime Minister to exercise caution, top surgeons have warned that thousands of people would die from Covid-19 if the lock was lifted at this point.

The Royal College of Surgeons has stated that the NHS should not be used as a “punching bag” to avoid damage to the economy.

The RCS stated that the lock could not be relaxed at this stage because health workers were not tested and the PPE available was insufficient for primary care physicians.

Professor Neil Mortensen, President-elect of RCS, told The Daily Telegraph: “Just because the NHS has not been outdated so far does not mean that the government can use health services as its punching bag. economic.

“It was a very close thing, and to use Boris Johnson’s own words,” we have started to fight it “, but the virus is certainly not yet defeated. “

At press conference No. 10 last night, Foreign Minister Dominic Raab noted a reported increase in virus cases in Germany, which made it easier to block.

He said a similar rise in the UK “is a very real risk”.

Traffic levels down across the country, but roads were still relatively busy in West London this morning

Traffic levels down across the country, but roads were still relatively busy in west London this morning

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