Two-year-old boy’s rash turned black with coronavirus “inflammatory syndrome”

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One mother described how her two-year-old son was rushed to hospital with a dangerous inflammatory syndrome that is linked to COVID-19.

Gemma Brown, 38, told MailOnline that her son Bertie was admitted to the Royal Worcestershire Hospital last month for his second birthday when his temperature soared more than 40 ° C (104 ° F) and that her spotty rash started to turn black.

Doctors were initially taken aback, but a senior consultant eventually diagnosed the boy with rare Kawasaki disease, a form of toxic shock syndrome that causes the body’s immune system to attack its own organs.

But Bertie did not receive a COVID-19 test, leaving doctors and his family unaware of a possible link between Kawasaki disease and the coronavirus.

Bertie Brown was admitted to the Royal Worcestershire hospital last month for his second birthday after developing a fever and rash on his body

Bertie Brown was admitted to the Royal Worcestershire Hospital last month for his second birthday after developing a fever and rash on his body

Her temperature climbed more than 40 ° C (104 ° F) and the spotted rash spread over her body and started to turn black

Her temperature climbed more than 40 ° C (104 ° F) and the spotted rash spread to her body and started to turn black

Doctors were initially baffled, but a senior consultant eventually diagnosed the boy's rare Kawasaki disease

Doctors were initially baffled, but a senior consultant eventually diagnosed the boy’s rare Kawasaki disease

The condition is a form of toxic shock syndrome that causes the body's immune system to attack its own organs

The condition is a form of toxic shock syndrome that causes the body’s immune system to attack its own organs

“I don’t know how the government is going to prove there is a link if it doesn’t test patients,” said the mother of two from Droitwich Spa, Worcestershire.

“I asked for it to be tested because I had a deep feeling that there was a connection between Covid and Kawasaki.

“The two attack your immune system and the whole family suffered from lust symptoms before Bertie got sick.”

“I was adamant that there was a link and asked for a test, but they just told me that there was no need to test those under five. “

The boy received an immunoglobin transfusion and was hospitalized for five days. “It was horrible to see it that way,” said Brown.

“He had no breathing problems but he was placed alone in a ward and he was easily the poorest child in the hospital.

“His rash had started to itch, but it quickly left him dying. His temperature was dangerously high and they watched him 24 hours a day. ”

Bertie, who was born very prematurely weighing only 1.5 lbs, has always had a weak immune system, making her susceptible to viruses.

Bertie Brown, two, mother Gemma, 38, and older brother George, 14

Bertie Brown, two, mother Gemma, 38, and older brother George, 14

Bertie's mother thinks that the painful rash (shown on her legs) was caused by a complication of the coronavirus

Bertie’s mother thinks that the painful rash (shown on her legs) was caused by a complication of the coronavirus

But Bertie did not receive a COVID-19 test, leaving doctors and family in the dark about a possible link

But Bertie did not receive a COVID-19 test, leaving doctors and family in the dark about a possible connection

WHAT IS KAWASAKI’S DISEASE?

KAWASAKI’S DISEASE

Kawasaki disease is a disease that causes inflammation in the walls of blood vessels and mainly affects children under the age of five.

Inflammation can weaken the coronary arteries, which supply the heart with blood. This can lead to aneurysms and heart attacks.

The condition affects eight out of 100,000 children and statistics show that it is fatal in 3% of untreated cases.

WHAT SYMPTOMS DO THEY CAUSE?

Symptoms of Kawasaki disease typically develop in three phases over a six-week period, according to advice on the NHS website.

The first signs are a fever and a rash in the first few weeks, followed by the eyes of children turning red and swollen.

It can also cause dryness and cracking of the lips, a sore throat, swollen lymph nodes and redness of the tongue, warns the NHS.

The second phase of Kawasaki disease often causes symptoms such as abdominal pain, vomiting, diarrhea, headache, joint pain and jaundice.

In the third phase, symptoms tend to go away, but children “may still lack energy and get tired easily during this time.”

“Thank goodness he’s fine now and has come home, although he’s still on Aspirin to keep his blood from clotting,” said his mother.

“It is much better in itself. But the point is, we just don’t know what’s going on because it hasn’t been tested for coronavirus. “

This morning, Secretary of Health Matt Hancock said that children with no underlying health problems may have died from an inflammatory syndrome linked to the virus.

Doctors were alerted on Monday to a sharp increase in the number of infants admitted to intensive care for Kawasaki-like illness in Britain and Italy.

The majority of Kawasaki’s patients are believed to be under the age of five, and some are so severely affected that they should be put on respiratory support.

The disease is a disease that causes inflammation in the walls of blood vessels and mainly affects children under the age of five.

There are around eight cases per 100,000 children in the UK and statistics show that it is fatal in 3% of untreated cases.

The new COVID-19 cases occur when someone with Kawasaki disease contracts the virus and it causes complications, an NHS source told The Guardian.

Children are not thought to be severely affected by COVID-19 – very few young people have died worldwide since the pandemic began in December.

Their apparent resilience to the disease baffled doctors for weeks because they are often “super-spreaders” of viral diseases such as the flu.

Children with this syndrome often suffer from stomach pain, heart inflammation and “gastrointestinal symptoms”, which may include vomiting and diarrhea.

Surgeon General Professor Chris Whitty said yesterday that it was “entirely plausible” that the increase was linked to the COVID-19 epidemic.

Yesterday at the press conference for No. 10, he added: “Because we know that in adults who of course have a lot more illnesses than children, big problems are caused by an inflammatory process and it looks like rather an inflammatory process, rather different. .

Bertie, who was born very prematurely weighing only 1.5 lbs, has always had a weak immune system, making him susceptible to viruses

Bertie, who was born very prematurely weighing only 1.5 lbs, has always had a weak immune system, making him susceptible to viruses

“Therefore, since we have a new presentation of this at a time with a new disease, the possibility – it is not certain, we must also look for other causes – but the possibility that there is a the link is certainly plausible. ‘

NHS medical director Professor Stephen Powis sent an alert to his experts on Monday asking them to dig up the alarming number of children with the syndrome.

According to the alert, which was originally shared with general practitioners in north London, affected children show signs similar to toxic shock syndrome (TSS), a serious illness associated with infections, and have online blood markers with severe Covid-19 in children.

Doctors compared the mysterious complication to Toxic Shock Syndrome and Kawasaki disease which, combined, causes harmful internal swelling, fever and respiratory problems – all of which are hallmarks of COVID-19.

But some of the children in intensive care have tested negative for the coronavirus, further complicating the diagnosis and raising questions that another pathogen may be causing the disease.

Officials have yet to provide clarity on the symptoms, despite calls from pediatricians to paint a clearer picture so they can monitor them.

It is not known how many children have suffered from inflammatory syndrome, or whether any of them have died from it. We also don’t know how old the children are.

But it is believed that it has so far only touched a “handful” of children, according to a prominent pediatrician who admitted that the complication could be caused by another pathogen.

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