Three NHS nurses forced to use trash bags diagnosed with Covid 19

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Three nurses carried on garbage bags due to a lack of protective equipment tested positive for coronavirus, we learned last night.

Front line staff at Northwick Park Hospital in Harrow were forced to put bags of clinical waste on their heads and feet last month due to the shortage of personal protective equipment (PPE).

Last week, the three nurses in the photo were diagnosed with the virus at a test center in north London, a senior source told The Daily Telegraph.

Three nurses from Northwick Park Hospital in London who posed last month while wearing protective equipment made from trash bags were diagnosed with Covid 19

Three nurses from Northwick Park Hospital in London who posed last month while wearing protective equipment made from trash bags were diagnosed with Covid 19

The three nurses worked at the North London hospital which was flooded with patients with Covid-19 symptoms

The three nurses were working at the North London hospital which was flooded with patients suffering from Covid-19 symptoms

A spokesperson for the London North West University Healthcare NHS Trust, which runs the Northwick Park Hospital, said: `` We can confirm that a number of staff working in our positive areas for Covid-19 have tested positive for coronavirus. This is unfortunate but not unexpected, as it corresponds to the experience of healthcare workers around the world. We provide full support to those of our staff members who are experiencing discomfort and wish them a speedy recovery. ”

A spokesperson for the London North West University Healthcare NHS Trust, which runs the Northwick Park Hospital, said: “We can confirm that a number of staff working in our Covid-19 positive areas have been tested positive for coronavirus. This is unfortunate but not unexpected, as it matches the experience of healthcare workers around the world. We provide full support to those of our staff members who are experiencing discomfort and wish them a speedy recovery. ”

Northwick Park Hospital was the first in the country to report a critical incident after an influx of coronavirus patients.

More than half of the staff in a ward are said to have contracted the virus, and hospital owners have been charged with failing to provide them with appropriate PPE.

A spokesperson for the London North West University Healthcare NHS Trust, which runs the Northwick Park Hospital, said: “We can confirm that a number of staff working in our Covid-19 positive areas have been tested positive for coronavirus.

“It is unfortunate but not unexpected, as it fits the experience of healthcare workers around the world.

“We provide full support to those of our staff members who are experiencing discomfort and wish them a speedy recovery.”

Speaking last month, one of the nurses said that she had no choice but to use trash bags due to the shortage of PPE in the hospital.

She said, “We could catch the virus ourselves. We need an appropriate PPE kit now, otherwise the nurses and doctors will die. It’s that simple.

“We are treating our own colleagues in the department after they have caught the virus from patients. How can it be true?

“There are so many young people here on ventilation – many have asthma or diabetes. They can’t stop coughing, they cough and cough and they can’t help it.

Yesterday, the Royal College of Nursing warned that the lack of PPE in health care facilities “fundamentally compromises” patient care.

The safety of nurses is also at risk, the union warned.

Despite repeated assurances that other personal protective equipment (PPE) is on the way, the MRC said that the kit did not reach the front line.

Nurses are still forced to share their equipment, buy their own kit or reuse it, according to RCM Director General and Secretary General Dame Donna Kinnair.

In a letter to Chair of the Parliamentary Health Committee and former health secretary, Jeremy Hunt, Dame Donna said nurses are forced to choose between their sense of duty and the safety of themselves and their children. family.

“Nurses are on the front line of the Covid-19 pandemic,” wrote Dame Donna in a letter dated April 6.

“Our safety and ability to care for patients is fundamentally compromised by the lack of adequate and correct supplies of vital personal protective equipment (PPE) and by the slow and small-scale deployment of Covid-19 tests.

“Our members are faced with impossible decisions between their own health or that of their family and their sense of duty.

“The distribution and adequacy of PPE has led nurses to share equipment, purchase their own supplies or reuse single-use PPE. Although there are announcements that millions of pieces of PPE are being distributed, they do not reach the front line in all health and care facilities. “

Global shortages of PPE have resulted in deficits on the NHS front line as doctors try to take care of the rising tide of Covid-19 patients.

Officials said that millions of kits had been distributed and that a hotline had been set up to help frontline workers get PPE where it was most needed.

But in submitting evidence to the health committee’s Covid investigation, the MRC added: “Measures to mitigate the distribution of PPE are considered by our members to be too slow and not very transparent.

“Public commitments have not resulted in an increase in adequate and consistently accessible PPE stocks.

“Without adequate and appropriate PPE, nurses put their own lives, the lives of their families and patients, at risk. This is unacceptable. “

The lack of PPE and hand cushions is particularly acute for nurses in general practitioners and nursing homes, added the MRC.

The MRC has stated that insufficient and inadequate PPE means that employers in health and care do not comply with legal obligations.

The union said it had written to the Health and Safety Executive asking it to intervene.

A spokesperson for the Ministry of Health and Social Affairs said, “We are working tirelessly to provide the NHS and the social care sector in general with the equipment and support they need to fight this epidemic.

“Each hospital, community pharmacy and ambulance trust has now received PPE. Yesterday we delivered over 30 million PPE items to NHS Trusts in England, and in the past few weeks over 600 million PPE items have been delivered, including masks, overalls, aprons and gloves.

“The whole weight of government is behind this effort and we continue to work closely with industry, social care providers, the NHS, the NHS supply chain and the military so that all our NHS and care staff have the protection they deserve. “

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