Stephen Hawking family’s new ‘iron lung’ ventilator to be tested with NHS

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A new fan approved by the family of Stephen Hawking should be tested with the NHS to help fight the deadly coronavirus.

Exovent was modeled after the “iron lung” used to fight the 20th century polio crisis and will first be tested at the Royal Victoria Infirmary in Newcastle.

It can be used in a normal service where patients are aware, unlike most devices used in hospitals that need sedatives.

Exovent was modeled after the

Exovent was modeled after the “iron lung” used to fight the 20th century polio crisis and will first be tested at the Royal Victoria Infirmary in Newcastle

Companies have rushed to build ventilators due to growing fears that the NHS will not be equipped to save a tsunami of patients who need it in the coming weeks.

The daily death toll from the coronavirus remained high on Saturday, with another 917 people reportedly dead, making a total of 9,875 victims.

The family of the late theoretical physicist Stephen Hawking, who died in 2018 after battling motor neuron disease since 1963, told the Sunday Telegraph: “As the family of a ventilated man, we know the difference in life and death that access to this type of medicine technology does.

The family of the late theoretical physicist Stephen Hawking (photo) said: `` As the family of a ventilated man, we know the difference in life and death made by access to this type of medical technology ''

The family of late theoretical physicist Stephen Hawking (photo) said: “As the family of a ventilated man, we know the difference in life and death that comes with having this type of medical technology.”

Exovent is a joint venture between engineers from Cambridge, Marshall Aerospace and Defense Group, the Warwick Manufacturing Group, the Royal National Throat Nose and Ear Hospital and the Imperial NHS Trust.

The fan is in the “detailed development planning stage,” the newspaper said, but 5,000 a week could be made.

Companies are discussing with the NHS how to use the technology to help Covid patients in intensive care units.

In a statement to Marshall Aerospace and Defense Group, the company says, “Conventional intermittent positive pressure ventilators (IPPVs) require the patient to be intubated via their tracheae, which means they must be sedated, and sometimes even paralyzed , while his chest is tightened to introduce and eliminate air in their lungs.

“NPV, on the other hand, does not require this invasive procedure, but instead patients remain aware, can take medication and food by mouth instead of drip, and continue to be able to speak. “

Companies have rushed to build ventilators due to growing fears that the NHS (photo, Nightingale's new hospital in London) will not be equipped to save a tsunami of patients who need it in the coming weeks

Companies have rushed to build ventilators due to growing fears that the NHS (photo, Nightingale’s new hospital in London) will not be equipped to save a tsunami of patients who need it in the coming weeks

Dr. Malcolm Coulthard, pediatrician at Newcastle Hospital, said: “Once the trials are started, it is a quick and easy product for manufacturers to make, it is a fairly robust product with few moving parts, it is something that can be quickly deployed.

“We hope that this product will be ready for testing in patients with Covid-19 disease in about two weeks. “

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