Restaurants selling groceries; Coronavirus pandemic disrupts food supply chain: NPR

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An increasing number of restaurants are offering products, dry goods and pantry clips to customers, in addition to their usual menu items. It helps customers buy essentials, provides restaurants with a source of income – and resolves a sudden cut in US food supply chains.

Max Posner / NPR

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Max Posner / NPR

An increasing number of restaurants are offering products, dry goods and pantry clips to customers, in addition to their usual menu items. It helps customers buy essentials, provides restaurants with a source of income – and resolves a sudden cut in US food supply chains.

Max Posner / NPR

Thai food and toilet paper. Fish and chips and flour. A bistro box… of local products.

With the closure of their dining rooms, an increasing number of restaurants are entering the grocery store, a source of liquidity essential in this crisis.

For customers, this is an opportunity to grab a few necessities without having to brave a crowded store (or fight for a coveted grocery delivery niche.) And while your local supermarket may be running out of flour , local restaurants probably have a lot.

In fact, in many cases, different supply chains supply food to restaurants than to grocery stores.

“There are players who only sell food for restaurants – which means they have big bags of food, they don’t have a brand,” says JP Frossard, consumer food analyst at Rabobank . “The distribution is different. The type of product may be different. “

Take flour, a hot item, while the people who take shelter at home take baking plans. Grocery stores sell a lot of 5-pound bags of flour and are struggling to keep the shelves full at this time. Meanwhile, restaurants and bakeries have easy access to flour – it’s just in 50-pound bags.

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