Premier League clubs tell players not to expect large cash transfers this summer

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Premier League clubs are warning their players that they cannot afford to spend big this summer.

West Ham and Southampton are the only two clubs to have announced that they have reached an agreement on carryovers while several others are in extensive discussions with the players.

However, several clubs have told players that they expect a big drop in summer spending and will be forced to make drastic savings during the coronavirus crisis.

It becomes a matter of trust for players who don’t want to sign up for postponements – only for clubs, and then spend big on the transfer market.



It could be a low-cost transfer window for Premier League clubs

Several clubs have so far held discussions on carryovers as they plan to spend money this summer and fear it will be difficult to sell to players.

Arsenal have been trying to get players to sign up for a 12.5% ​​pay cut for a year – the amount will be refunded if they qualify for next season’s Champions League.

The compromise was rejected by Arsenal players and the club attempted to make a follow-up offer that money would be refunded if the club qualified for the Champions League in the next TWO years.

They also offered to refund the money to players if they were sold at a profit or if they signed a new contract, but Arsenal players are only likely to accept deferrals.



The likes of Jadon Sancho have been linked to a Premier League move

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The likes of Dortmund Jadon Sancho and Timo Werner of RB Leipzig have been linked to big funds transferred to the Premier League this summer, with likes of Manchester United, Liverpool and Chelsea being tied to the former.

But in the midst of the current crisis, it remains to be seen how much elite clubs allocate to transfers, and the multi-million pound price charged to players may prove unrealistic for the foreseeable future.

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