PM thanks NHS staff for vital care with special mention for two doctors

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The NHS hero who saved Boris Johnson’s life and stood by his bed when things could have gone both ways was photographed.

The Prime Minister spent last week at St Thomas Hospital – including three nights in intensive care – being treated for the virus.

Shortly after his release, Johnson released a video thanking the medical professionals who helped his recovery.

Specifically, he thanked a group of nurses in the video posted this afternoon, he said, “I’m going to forget some names, so forgive me, but I want to thank Po Ling and Shannon and Emily and Angel and Connie and Becky and Rachael and Nicky and Ann.

Mr. Johnson's video message from inside # 10 this afternoon after he was released from the hospital

Interior Johnson’s video message # 10 this afternoon after he was released from hospital

The Prime Minister then appointed two health professionals who “stood by my bed for 48 hours when things could have gone both ways.”

He added: “These are Jenny from New Zealand – Invercargill on the South Island to be exact – and Luis from Portugal – near Porto.

“The reason in the end, my body started to have enough oxygen because every second of the night they were watching, they thought, they were busy and they were doing the procedures I needed. “

The senior Portuguese nurse who looked after Mr. Johnson is said to be Luis Pitarma.

The 29-year-old, born in Aveiro, just 50 kilometers from Porto, is said to have moved to London in 2014 after completing his medical qualifications in Lisbon.

This afternoon, he was thanked by the President of Portugal, Marcelo Rebelo de Sousa, on a phone call.

The pulmonology specialists at St Thomas Hospital are among the best in the UK and the hospital now has a dedicated team to manage COVID-19 patients.

It had previously been revealed that one of the physicians overseeing Mr. Johnson’s care was pulmonology specialist Dr. Richard Leach, a senior clinician at Guy’s and St Thomas ‘Hospital.

Dr. Leach has worked at the Central London Hospital Trust since 1994 and at the King Edward VII Hospital since 2016.

His encyclopedic knowledge of the respiratory system has even been established in five large textbooks.

Dr. Richard Leach, Senior Clinician at Guy and St Thomas Hospital, responsible for recovery from Prime Minister's Coronavirus and was at his bedside

Dr. Richard Leach, senior clinician at Guy and St Thomas Hospital, was responsible for recovering from the Prime Minister’s coronavirus and was at his bedside

While Dr. Leach is said to have assumed ultimate responsibility for the treatment of Mr. Johnson, hospital sources warned against exaggerating the practical role he played.

Another health care professional believed he was supervising the Prime Minister during his hospital stay: Dr. Luigi Camporota, an intensive care medical consultant.

Last week, Dr. Camporota held a seminar explaining to other hospitals the best way to tie a coronavirus patient to a ventilator

In a tweet following her fiancé’s discharge from the hospital, Carrie Symonds said there had been “very dark” moments last week.

The PM, who was wearing a suit, will not immediately return to work on the orders of the doctors, instead of recovering at Checkers, his country residence in Buckinghamshire.

In the video, he also said that the NHS would be “invincible” in the face of the coronavirus pandemic.

Another health professional who thought he was supervising the Prime Minister during his hospital stay was Dr. Luigi Camporota, an intensive care medical consultant.

Another health professional who believed he was supervising the Prime Minister while in hospital was Dr. Luigi Camporota, an intensive care medical consultant.

He said: “I left the hospital today after a week in which the NHS saved my life, there is no question.

“It’s hard to find the words to express my debt – but before I get there, I want to thank everyone across the UK for the effort and sacrifice you have made and made. “

He thanked people for continuing to distance themselves and isolate themselves, saying, “I believe your efforts are worth it and prove their worth every day. “

Although he said that “the struggle is by no means over,” he seemed to offer some hope, adding that progress was being made.

He said: “We are progressing in this national battle because the British public has formed a human shield around this country’s greatest national asset – our National Health Service.”

Johnson said he had personally “seen the pressure from the NHS” and listed essential personnel, including cleaners, cooks and any health care workers who he said had shown “personal courage” by continuing to work and by “risking this deadly virus”.

He said: “It is thanks to this courage, this devotion, this duty and this love that our NHS has been unbeatable. “

His pregnant fiancée Carrie Symonds tweeted his praise for the staff at St Thomas Hospital, adding: `` There were moments last week that were really very dark

His pregnant fiancée Carrie Symonds tweeted his praise for the staff at St Thomas Hospital, adding: “There were moments last week that were really very dark

Shortly after her release was announced, Ms. Symonds tweeted to pay tribute to the “magnificent NHS.”

She said, “I can never, never pay you back, and I will never stop thanking you.

“There were moments last week that were really dark. My heart goes out to all those who find themselves in similar situations, worried and sick of their loved ones.

“Thank you also to everyone who sent such messages of support. Today, I feel incredibly lucky.

Stanley Johnson said he was delighted with the latest update, telling PA news agency that he hoped his son “was not doing too much” when he recuperated at Checkers.

Mr. Johnson, who is on his farm in Exmoor, said, “I am absolutely delighted to hear that Boris has left the hospital – this is wonderful news.

“Of course, it’s not just me who’s thrilled, but the whole family.

“I am particularly happy that he can now be with his fiancée Carrie, and if they are going to Checkers, I really hope he won’t do too much. “

He also praised the NHS for the care of his son.

He added: “I realize now – I think the whole country realizes – how badly he got into a crisis and it is wonderful that he is out of this crisis.

“It is wonderful that the national health service could help him and I think he also paid tribute to them.

“Our thoughts are with everyone, not only those who lead the battle against the coronavirus, but those who suffer from it. “

Dr. Ian Abbs, CEO of Guy’s and St Thomas ‘, paid tribute to the hospital staff.

He said: “It is a great credit for the exceptional professionalism of the clinical teams, as well as of all members of the organization at large, that we have been able to take care of the Prime Minister so effectively, while continuing to provide equally high standards of care for all our patients.

He said that thoughts should “turn immediately to those who still need our help at this time” and reiterated the call to people to “stay at home to help us save lives and protect the NHS ”.

Speech by Boris Johnson to the Nation as a Whole: Prime Minister Thanks NHS Staff and Public for Staying Inside After Leaving Hospital

Boris Jonson talks about Downing Street

Boris Jonson talks about Downing Street

When he left St. Thomas Hospital this afternoon, the Prime Minister spoke to the nation in a video posted on Twitter. Here is the full transcript of what he said:

Good afternoon,

I left the hospital today after a week in which the NHS saved my life, no doubt.

It’s hard to find the words to express my debt – but before I get there, I want to thank everyone across the UK for the effort and sacrifice you have made and made.

When the sun is up and the children are at home; when the natural world seems at its best and the outdoors is so welcoming, I can only imagine how difficult it was to follow the rules of social distancing

Thank you because so many millions and millions of people across the country have done the right thing – millions of people struggling with self-isolation – faithfully, patiently, thinking and caring for others as well as of themselves.

I want you to know that this Easter Sunday, I believe your efforts are worth it and prove their worth every day.

Because although we mourn those who are taken from us in such large numbers every day, and although the struggle is by no means over, we are now progressing in this incredible national battle against the coronavirus.

A fight that we never chose against an enemy that we still do not fully understand.

We are advancing in this national battle because the British public has formed a human shield around this country’s greatest national asset – our National Health Service.

We understood and decided that if together we could keep our NHS safe, if we could prevent our NHS from being overwhelmed, then we could not be beaten, and this country would rise together and overcome this challenge, as we have overcome so many challenges in the past.

In the past seven days, of course, I have seen the pressure on the NHS.

I saw the personal courage not only of the doctors and nurses, but of everyone, housekeepers, cooks, health professionals of all kinds – physiotherapists, radiographers, pharmacists – who kept coming to work , to put themselves in danger. , continued to risk this deadly virus.

It is thanks to this courage, this devotion, this duty and this love that our NHS has been unbeatable.

I want to pay my own thanks to the brilliant doctors, leaders in their fields, men and women, but many of them for some reason called Nick, who made crucial decisions a few days ago for which I will be grateful for the rest of my life.

I want to thank the many nurses, men and women, whose care has been so amazing.

I’m going to forget some names, so forgive me, but I want to thank Po Ling and Shannon and Emily and Angel and Connie and Becky and Rachael and Nicky and Ann.

And I hope it won’t bother them if I specifically mention two nurses who stood by my bedside for 48 hours when things could have gone both ways.

These are Jenny from New Zealand – Invercargill on the South Island to be exact – and Luis from Portugal – near Porto.

And the reason in the end my body started getting enough oxygen because for every second of the night, they were watching and thinking and they were busy and doing the procedures I needed.

This is how I also know that across the country, 24 hours a day, for every second of every hour, there are hundreds of thousands of NHS staff members who act with the same care, thought and the same precision as Jenny and Luis.

This is why we are going to defeat this coronavirus and defeat it together.

We will win because our NHS is the beating heart of this country. It’s the best in this country. It’s invincible. It is fueled by love.

So thank you from me, and from all of us at the NHS, and remember to follow the rules of social distancing. Stay at home, protect our NHS and save lives.

Thank you and Happy Easter.

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