Ohio, 60-year-old man who lashed out at COVID-19 as “political ploy” dies after contracting coronavirus

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John W. McDaniel, 60, of Marion County, Ohio, died Wednesday of COVID-19 in a Columbus hospital

John W. McDaniel, 60, of Marion County, Ohio, died Wednesday of COVID-19 in a Columbus hospital

A 60-year-old Ohio man who rejected state foreclosure against coronaviruses as a “political ploy” and claimed that the governor did not have the power to close businesses because of the pandemic is died of COVID-19.

John W. McDaniel tested positive for coronavirus in late March and died Wednesday at Riverside Methodist Hospital in Columbus.

On Facebook, he dismissed the killer virus as a “political ploy” which he said officials used to control the public.

“Someone has the guts to say that this COVID19 is a political ploy? Ask a friend. Prove to me that I am mistaken », he writes in an article of March 13.

He then said that the governors did not have “the authority” to shut down the bars and that anyone who feared falling ill “simply” should not go out.

It is not known if McDaniel had underlying health conditions that might have contributed to his death. According to his obituary, he fought cancer in the 80s.

He is survived by his wife and two adult sons. It is not known if any of them fell ill or became infected.

McDaniel was the president of his company’s industrial manufacturing company.

His death comes as officials continue to struggle to temper growing public unrest and impatience with lockdown orders against the persistent threat of the virus.

McDaniel wrote on March 13 that

McDaniel wrote on March 13 that “this Covid19 is a political ploy”

McDaniel posted a series of Facebook posts exploding the state-imposed coronavirus lockdown. He criticized Ohio Governor Mike DeWine, saying he had no power to order companies to close

McDaniel posted a series of Facebook posts exploding the state-imposed coronavirus lockdown. He criticized Ohio Governor Mike DeWine, saying he had no power to order companies to close

While some states with fewer cases are confident about a gradual opening in the coming days and weeks, others, like New York, are waiting until tests are more widely available and reliable.

McDaniel is survived by his wife and two adult sons. Health officials extend condolences to family after death was announced last week

McDaniel is survived by his wife and two adult sons. Health officials extend condolences to family after death was announced last week

Ohio, which has 12,516 cases and recorded 491 deaths, is one of the states where the need to return to work trumps the public health crisis.

A quarter of the state’s cases concern the prison population.

There were demonstrations of anger this week in retaliation for the pending home stay order.

McDaniel is the first resident in his riding to die from COVID-19.

“On behalf of the entire Marion County community, we extend our sincere condolences to her family and friends,” said Marion’s public health commissioner Traci Kinsler in a press release issued Wednesday after her dead.

“Our thoughts are with the community of Marion County, as well as all Ohioans and those around the world who are battling this disease and the families of all those affected by this pandemic.”

Governor DeWine announced Monday that Ohio schools will remain closed for the rest of the school year while classes continue at a distance.

Protesters gather outside the Ohio State House in Columbus, Ohio on April 20, 2020. Thousands of people have attended anti-lockdown rallies in cities across the country to demand the reopening of their states because stay-at-home orders violate their constitutional rights.

Protesters gather outside the Ohio State House in Columbus, Ohio on April 20, 2020. Thousands of people have attended anti-lockdown rallies in cities across the country to demand the reopening of their states because stay-at-home orders violate their constitutional rights.

Ohio Governor Mike DeWhine tweeted Monday to say he had `` full respect '' for the protesters, but wanted them to understand the public health threat of reopening the state too early

Ohio Governor Mike DeWhine tweeted Monday saying he had “full respect” for protesters, but wanted them to understand the public health threat of reopening the state too soon

He said he had “full respect” for the protesters, but he implores people to continue practicing social isolation.

“We won a battle, we did well, but # COVID19 is still there and most Ohioans are still sensitive to it. The concern for spread is still as strong today as it was a month ago, “he said in a series of tweets on Monday.

“I have the utmost respect for the protesters, but I just ask them to be safe.

“My job is to listen to the people of Ohio and guide us in a way that will allow us to overcome this by losing as few people as possible while trying to rebuild our economy,” he said in a another tweet.

President Trump has contributed to the tensions.

In a series of tweets last week, he urged the governors of Michigan, Minnesota and Virginia to “liberate” their people by reopening.

DeWine was the first governor in the country to close schools across the state.

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