New figures show number of people visiting UK A&E districts halved this month

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The NHS is launching a new campaign to make sure people seek emergency care during a medical emergency after visits to A&E have dropped by nearly 50% this month.

Health officials fear that many people will not seek treatment because they fear contracting Covid-19, endangering their survival and possibly becoming collateral damage to the virus.

Recent research has found that four in 10 people are too worried about being a burden on the NHS to ask for help from their GP.

NHS CEO Sir Simon Stevens said the NHS is still there for non-Covid patients who may suffer from stroke, heart attack and other life-threatening conditions.

It is forecast that there will be a million fewer visits to A&E in April, compared to 2.1 million visits recorded in the same period last year.

Paramedics wearing personal protective equipment assist an ambulance patient at Royal London Hospital

Paramedics wearing personal protective equipment assist an ambulance patient at Royal London Hospital

Professor Powis said there were concerns about fewer people seeking medical help for problems unrelated to the coronavirus.

Asked about loss of life because people don’t show up for doctors, he told BBC Breakfast: “It would be true to say that we are concerned about this.

“It is clear that we have seen a reduction in A&E presence.

“If everyone is self-isolating, there may be fewer transmitted infections than Covid-19.

“What we absolutely want people to do is that if you have a condition, especially an emergency that is not a coronavirus, you should not be afraid to access health services. “

Senior clinicians at the Royal College of Pediatrics and Child Health and medical health charities such as the British Heart Foundation and the Stroke Association are also concerned.

Photographs have revealed deserted emergency departments in two of our larger hospitals.

The number of people coming to A&E for suspected heart attacks has halved since the beginning of March, from 300 to 150 per day.

Nursing home owners blame rising death toll on “reckless stiff broom” policy to discharge hundreds of elderly coronavirus patients to free up hospital beds

Nursing home owners blamed the skyrocketing death toll in the area on government directives asking hospitals to release the elderly to free beds.

The frightening warning came in the wake of a government document advising hospitals, “to unleash the capacity of the NHS by quickly discharging it into the community and reducing planned care.”

Abbotswood Nursing Home in Ballasalla (photo) had their license suspended on April 13 after nearly 40 residents tested positive for coronavirus

Abbotswood Nursing Home in Ballasalla (photo) had their license suspended on April 13 after nearly 40 residents tested positive for coronavirus

The plan, written on March 17, told NHS hospitals that it is important to “get out quickly” – and told nursing homes to accept patients who had not even been tested for coronavirus .

It has since been updated saying that the policy will “move” for patients tested before admission to nursing homes.

But residents who come from their homes do not have to be tested before admission.

The devastating impact on the elderly has been exposed in recent days, after Care England estimated the number of Covid-19 deaths in nursing homes at 7,500 a week ago.

Questions continue to emerge about the actual number of Britons who died in nursing homes after figures from Northern Ireland yesterday showed that a third of the deaths were elderly.

It is estimated that as many as 5,000 people normally expected during the same period simply did not show up.

One of Britain’s most experienced cancer doctors, Karol Sikora, warned in the Daily Mail this week that our healthcare system has given up on its bread and butter job of routine operations, testing and analyzes.

Cancer Research UK has warned that 2,700 cancers a week are currently undiagnosed.

In addition, response times to ambulance emergencies are the worst ever recorded, forcing victims of heart attacks to wait two hours on average, sometimes with fatal consequences.

And on top of that, many of those who are gravely ill and awaiting life-saving surgery or treatment are turned away by doctors who fear their patients will catch the virus in the departments of our besieged hospitals.

Organ transplants, for example, have dropped dramatically. Last spring, more than 80 weekly sessions were performed.

Today, only a few of the most urgent heart and liver cases are treated weekly, with surgeons reluctant to place patients in intensive care units near highly infectious Covid-19 patients.

Last week, the National Statistics Office revealed that deaths in England and Wales in the week before April 10 were the highest in 20 years. Of course, this was largely due to the virus.

But nearly 1,800 of these additional deaths were not directly caused by it. Doctors have described the phenomenon as “collateral damage” from Covid-19.

A new public health campaign will be launched starting next week to remind people to contact their GP or call 111 if they need urgent care and to go to the hospital if they are told to do it.

People in emergencies should always call 999.

He also urges the British to make normal use of other vital services such as cancer screening and treatment, maternity appointments and mental health support.

Sir Simon said, “Although NHS staff have done everything possible to fight the coronavirus, they have also worked hard to ensure that patients who do not have Covid-19 can safely access essential services.

“Ignoring the problems can have serious consequences – now or in the future. “

Here, in a photo provided to The Mail by a member of the public, is the Royal London Hospital's A&E waiting room at 4 p.m. Saturday afternoon.

Here, in a photo provided to The Mail by a member of the public, is the Royal London Hospital’s A&E waiting room at 4 p.m. Saturday afternoon.

As a result of efforts to increase capacity to deal with the coronavirus threat, the NHS now has 33,000 emergency care beds in traditional hospitals.

The NHS also oversaw the construction of seven new Nightingale field hospitals across the country.

The campaign will include information from doctors, nurses and patient groups to highlight how health services have adapted to the pandemic to ensure safe access to all types of emergency care.

Professor Carrie MacEwen, President of the Academy of Medical Royal Colleges, said, “We are very concerned that patients cannot access the NHS for care because they do not want to be a burden or because that they are afraid of catching the virus.

“Everyone should know that the NHS is always open for business and it is extremely important that if people have problems or serious problems, they ask for help. “

The British Heart Foundation has reported a 50% drop in the number of people attending A&E with heart attacks, risking their survival.

Earlier this week, Cancer Research UK warned that 2,250 new cases of the disease might go undetected every week – in part due to patients’ reluctance to go to their GP.

Health Secretary Matt Hancock also expressed concern.

British National Medical Director of the National Health Service (NHS), Professor Stephen Powis, holds digital press conference on the ongoing pandemic of COVID-19

British National Medical Director of the National Health Service (NHS), Professor Stephen Powis, holds digital press conference on the ongoing pandemic of COVID-19

Speaking in the House of Commons on Wednesday, he said, “If you are told to go to the hospital, the place you need to be is in the hospital.

“The NHS is there for you and can provide you with the best care if you need it.”

This comes as the government faces calls for more transparency in scientific advice to ministers on the coronavirus epidemic.

Downing Street has angrily dismissed allegations that the boards could be politicized following the release of Boris Johnson’s aide Dominic Cummings, who had attended meetings of a key science group.

Opposition parties, however, said that political advisers had no interest in participating in the Scientific Emergency Advisory Group (Sage) and asked that its deliberations be opened for further examination.

The argument arose as the coronavirus lockdown entered its fifth weekend with fears that the warm weather forecast for much of the country could see people ignore the rules of social distancing.

More than 19,000 people have died in hospital after being tested positive for coronavirus in the UK, and many more deaths are expected in nursing homes.

Meanwhile, it appeared that talks had taken place between the ministers and the Premier League on the restart of the football season after the government decided that the conditions for easing the lock were in place.

The controversy over Sage – who will advise ministers on lifting the restrictions – came after The Guardian reported that Mr. Cummings and Ben Warner, a data scientist who had worked with him on the Vote Leave campaign in the referendum on the Brexit, were present at Sage. meetings.

Downing Street denied that they were members of the group and said they were simply seeking to better understand the science involved and how it could inform government decision-making.

“Sage provides independent scientific advice to the government. Political advisers have no role to play in this area, “said a spokesman for the No.10 group.

“Sage scientists are among the most eminent in their field. It is in fact false and detrimental to a sensible public debate to suggest that their advice is affected by government advisers who listen to the discussions.

“Public confidence in the media fell apart during this emergency, in part because of ridiculous stories like this one. “

However, Shadow Secretary Jonathan Ashworth said the disclosure raised “important questions” about the credibility of the government’s decision-making process.

“Dominic Cummings has no place in the government’s scientific coronavirus advisory group,” he said.

“He is a political advisor, not a medical or scientific expert. If the public wants to trust the Sage, the government must make it clear that Dominic Cummings can no longer participate or attend.

“We also need full transparency on who attends the Sage meeting, which is under discussion. “

Key staff expressed frustration after spots for coronavirus testing ran out just an hour after site opened today (photo, test site in Surrey today)

Key staff expressed frustration after spots for coronavirus testing ran out just an hour after site opened today (photo, test site in Surrey today)

Some 5,000 home kits and 19,000 driving tests were expected to be available on Saturday - key workers have been asked to fill out an online request form as government rushes to reach its 100,000 goal tests per day next Thursday (photo, a test site in London)

Some 5,000 home kits and 19,000 driving tests were expected to be available on Saturday – key workers have been asked to fill out an online request form as government rushes to reach its 100,000 goal tests per day next Thursday (photo, a test site in London)

Meanwhile, it turned out that Culture Secretary Oliver Dowden was in talks with governing bodies of several major sports; football should be the first to get the green light to resume matches behind closed doors.

It is understood that detailed discussions have taken place with medical officials from Public Health England on the criteria that should be met for the games to take place.

A government spokesperson said, “The ministers continue to work with the governing bodies of sports on how live sporting events can resume in the future.

“This can only happen once we have passed all five tests to mitigate the social distancing measures. “

The government has also given the green light to a clinical trial to determine whether the plasma from the blood of recovered coronavirus patients could help treat other people who are fighting the disease.

Treatment is said to involve “convalescent plasma” from the blood of people who have recovered from the virus, transfused into patients who are struggling to make their own antibodies to the disease.

Convalescent plasma was used as a treatment during the Sars epidemic.

Thousands of people are also expected to try to book a coronavirus test on the new government website on Saturday, after testing was completed soon after it went live on Friday.

Some 46,000 people have tried to book a test, with more than 10 million key workers and their households now eligible for a test as the government rushes to meet its goal of 100,000 tests a day next Thursday.

As part of the expansion, NHS and social service staff, police, teachers, social workers, funeral directors, journalists, and those working in supermarkets and food production are among those who are now eligible.

But in the two minutes following the launch of the website at 6 a.m. on Friday, the 5,000 tests to be done at home were booked, while more than 15,000 test appointments in the centers were also taken quickly.

The Department of Health said a total of 19,506 patients died in hospital after testing positive for the coronavirus in the UK at 5 p.m. Thursday, up 768 from 18,738 the previous day.

Deserted Hospitals in Britain: Forgotten Cancer Victims, Canceled Vital Operations and the Ghost Town A & Es Where Patients Are Afraid to Walk – A Devastating Statement on How Those With NO Coronaviruses Shamefully Left Behind

By Sue Reid for the Daily Mail

The photographs show the deserted emergency departments of two of our larger hospitals.

They were captured during the day in the midst of a government-ordered foreclosure order to fight the deadly Covid-19 virus.

Normally, the waiting room at Royal London in Whitechapel in the East End would be occupied by 500 patients coming from the streets to see a doctor every 24 hours.

However, as the photo below – taken on a Saturday afternoon – shows, the place is empty.

Not a full chair, no one at the vending machine, and the usual queue at reception non-existent.

The person who took the photo, a mail reader and a doctor, said the image was deeply disturbing.

“A tragedy is taking place because people are afraid of catching the coronavirus if they set foot in a hospital,” she said.

“They stay at home even if they have serious illnesses and it will cost countless lives. Where are all those who have heart attacks and strokes? No one comes here. “

This is St Thomas Hospital, in central London, A&E waiting room at 4 p.m. last Friday afternoon. The image was provided by a member of the public

This is St Thomas Hospital in central London, A&E waiting room at 4 p.m. last Friday afternoon. The image was provided by a member of the public

This is a concern shared by Secretary of Health Matt Hancock, who this week urged non-coronavirus patients in need of urgent care to seek help immediately. He said, “The NHS is there for you. “

He was speaking in the House of Commons after doctors and medical charities warned of a hidden health crisis among non-Covid patients who are feared to die in the thousands.

A frightened public avoids accident and emergency services for fear of the virus or overloading the NHS.

The number of people coming to A&E for suspected heart attacks has halved since the beginning of March, from 300 to 150 per day.

It is estimated that as many as 5,000 people normally expected during the same period simply did not show up.

At the same time, routine hospital treatments and investigations such as cancer screening have been suspended while resources are diverted in the fight against Covid-19.

One of Britain’s most experienced cancer doctors, Karol Sikora, warned in the Mail this week that our healthcare system has given up on its bread and butter job of routine operations, testing and testing. ‘analyzes.

Cancer Research UK has warned that 2,700 cancers a week are currently undiagnosed.

NHS President and CEO Sir Simon Stevens said the NHS is still there for non-Covid patients who may be suffering from a stroke, heart attack and other life-threatening conditions

NHS President and CEO Sir Simon Stevens said the NHS is still there for non-Covid patients who may suffer from stroke, heart attack and other life-threatening conditions

In addition, response times to ambulance emergencies are the worst ever recorded, forcing victims of heart attacks to wait two hours on average, sometimes with fatal consequences.

And on top of that, many of those who are gravely ill and awaiting life-saving surgery or treatment are turned away by doctors who fear their patients will catch the virus in the departments of our besieged hospitals.

Organ transplants, for example, have dropped dramatically. Last spring, more than 80 weekly sessions were performed.

Today, only a few of the most urgent heart and liver cases are treated weekly, with surgeons reluctant to place patients in intensive care units near highly infectious Covid-19 patients.

The tragic result is that across the UK we are witnessing a dramatic increase in deaths from diseases other than the virus.

And because so many people are not diagnosed with serious illnesses, there will be many more in the future.

Last week, the National Statistics Office revealed that deaths in England and Wales in the week before April 10 were the highest in 20 years. Of course, this was largely due to the virus.

But nearly 1,800 of these additional deaths were not directly caused by it. Doctors have described the phenomenon as “collateral damage” from Covid-19.

So who are the victims of this hidden health crisis?

The Mail has spoken to critically ill patients who are desperately waiting for treatment to save them.

They do not blame those hit by Covid-19, but many believe that our busy NHS has abandoned them in their hour of need.

One is Lara Wahab, 32, a manager of an advertising agency, who is awaiting an organ transplant at a specialty hospital in Oxford.

Lara, who lives with her sister in north London, has type 1 diabetes and has been suffering from the disease since the age of seven.

Lara Wahab, 32, director of an advertising agency, awaits an organ transplant in a specialized hospital in Oxford

Lara Wahab, 32, director of an advertising agency, awaits an organ transplant in a specialized hospital in Oxford

In April of last year, she learned that her kidneys were failing and was put forward for a simultaneous kidney and pancreas transplant.

It’s about waiting for a deceased donor who should match both organs perfectly.

Waiting for the phone call to match the organs was like living on the edge of a knife, she said. But then, she adds, came “the twist of intrigue: the coronavirus”.

One day, she logged into her patient portal and discovered that her transplant status had gone from active to suspended due to the shortage of intensive care beds caused by the virus.

She is now in limbo and urges the government to “remember” patients like her in the fight against the coronavirus. “I want the public to know that we are also the fallout from a virus like this,” she said.

But Lara is just one of many trapped in what can only be described as a nightmare.

Duncan McLean, father of two from Stevenage, Hertfordshire, is battling aggressive bladder cancer and was due to undergo surgery on May 1.

The 39-year-old has already had a total of 33 tumors removed in hospital surgery.

Duncan McLean, father of two from Stevenage, Hertfordshire, is battling aggressive bladder cancer and was due to undergo surgery on May 1.

Duncan McLean, father of two from Stevenage, Hertfordshire, is battling aggressive bladder cancer and was due to undergo surgery on May 1.

He explained this week: “I was told that my operation would continue. Then I received a call two days later from an NHS call center telling me that it had been canceled because of the virus.

“It was followed by a letter from my hospital consultant, Stevenage’s Lister, confirming that it was postponed for six to eight weeks” subject to the progression of the coronavirus. “

“My cancer has grown faster and I panic because it is now free to my body. Common sense must prevail. When the virus has left us, we will have people who have not received medical help and who have seen their lives at risk.

“The virus is horrible, but people still have strokes and heart attacks. You can’t just stop their treatments. There are hundreds of hospitals across the UK. Why don’t they designate at least one patient without corona to deal with people like me? “

Ben Hurd, 33, of Barnsley, South Yorkshire, is desperately worried and has an aggressive brain tumor that needs chemotherapy to reduce his cancer.

“Doctors say there may be other patients with the virus in the transport they put to take me to Sheffield hospital, an hour’s drive away, for treatment. I can’t go there if I catch them, ”he explains.

Ben, a head of nursing home who lives at home with his parents, is advised by the charity Brain Tumor Research, who says that patients are thrown into a “world of uncertainty” because of the crisis of coronavirus.

Last May, Ben started having headaches and blinking lights in his left eye.

An analysis revealed brain damage and he had emergency surgery for more than seven hours that month.

The operation removed most, but unfortunately not all, of his tumor.

He was told that he had 12 to 18 months left to live.

The only thing that could turn things around is the chemotherapy treatment for which he needs regular blood tests at the hospital.

“They’re talking about my return to the doctor in late May, but at the moment I can only cross my fingers,” he said.

Another patient cruelly faced with a transplant delay in the pandemic is Ana-Rose Thorpe of Manchester, who has lived with hepatitis hepatitis since contracting it when she was a baby.

The 29-year-old woman’s liver is deteriorating as she waits for a new donor organ.

She feels “swept” while her treatment is on hold because she can get the coronavirus if she goes to the hospital, even for tests.

“The more I’m not watched, the more I leave her, I could get sicker,” she says.

Ana-Rose Thorpe, of Manchester, 29, has been living with hepatitis since he was a baby

Ana-Rose Thorpe, of Manchester, 29, has been living with hepatitis since he was a baby

“Going to the hospital with corona patients makes me afraid that I can get the virus. Its a question of life or death. “

But it is not only hospitals that restrict the treatment of NHS. The public themselves are reluctant to go to A&E because they are afraid of getting the virus.

Marita Edwards, an 80-year-old woman, was the first person to die from the disease in a British hospital.

Edwards, who had no underlying medical conditions, went to the Royal Gwent Hospital in Newport, south Wales, in late February for routine gallbladder surgery.

Later, she developed an infection, which was thought to be pneumonia. She died after being tested positive for Covid-19 three weeks after arriving at the hospital.

Ms. Edwards is not the only person who died of the virus after catching it in hospital. No wonder people are terrified of entering it.

A weeks-long Mail survey shows how dramatically emptied the emergency services have been.

Nationwide, the Mail discovered that A & Es hospitals that struggled to cope with the winter with high astronomical numbers were now deserted.

At the Royal Stoke University Hospital in Staffordshire, where in 2018 disturbing photos of injured people lying on beds in hallways, we discovered that the arrival rate of 11,000 injured people per month had dropped.

Official figures posted on the hospital’s website this week showed that on Wednesday, when we checked the 12-hour numbers, there were never more than 30 patients waiting for treatment.

In the past, he could have counted hundreds. The same was true for other hospitals and walk-in centers in the city.

But the most revealing evidence, sent by a second reader, is perhaps a photo showing the waiting room at St Thomas Hospital in central London, where Boris Johnson’s life was saved thanks to the oxygen therapy when he caught a coronavirus.

On the other side of the Thames, outside the Houses of Parliament, the hospital’s emergency department is normally crowded.

On a Friday afternoon, just after the lockdown was announced last month, our photo revealed that there was only one man waiting to see a doctor.

As a hospital emergency nurse told the Mail, “The staff are here. They wait in vain for the patients.

«Nous sommes confrontés à une profonde suspicion de la part des Britanniques qui ont toujours fait confiance au NHS.

« Nous craignons que la relation de confiance entre le public et les services de santé soit rompue. “

La crise de Covid-19 est en effet terrifiante. Des milliers de personnes se trouvent aujourd’hui dans nos hôpitaux luttant contre le meurtrier Covid-19.

Mais la vérité est que beaucoup d’autres peuvent perdre la vie à cause de cela. Et ils n’auront même jamais attrapé le virus mortel qui change le monde que nous connaissons.

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