Mohamed Salah is one of the biggest names in football marking the start of Ramadan

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Mohamed Salah, Mesut Ozil and Antonio Rudiger will celebrate Ramadan like no other as the holy month begins amid unprecedented restrictions due to the coronavirus.

Ramadan begins on Thursday, April 23 and continues until Saturday, May 23, the period of fasting takes place during the lockout.

Nevertheless, traditions are practiced around the world to mark the start of the holy celebration and some of the biggest names in football have taken social media to post photos of them getting ready.

Mohamed Salah hung symbolic lanterns at his house to mark the start of Ramadan

Mohamed Salah hung symbolic lanterns at his house to mark the start of Ramadan

Liverpool star smiles for camera as he begins to celebrate holy month

Liverpool star smiles for camera as he begins to celebrate the holy month

Salah is one of the many Muslims who participate in Ramadan from home. The Egyptian uploaded a series of photographs to his Instagram account showing him preparing for the holy month.

He is shown decorating his house with lanterns because they symbolize the holidays and welcome the next month of Ramadan.

Other footballers, including Mesut Ozil, Antonio Rudiger and Xherdan Shaqiri, will follow suit by celebrating at home.

Mesut Ozil is another of the famous faces in football who are changing their traditions amidst the coronavirus

Mesut Ozil is another of the famous faces in football who are changing their traditions amidst the coronavirus

Another devoted Muslim who will participate in the holy period is Xherdan Shaqiri

Another devoted Muslim who will participate in the holy period is Xherdan Shaqiri

In this period – which marks the ninth month of the Muslim year and the window in which the Koran – or the Koran – was first revealed to the Prophet Muhammad by Allah, Muslims will also refrain from eating and drinking during the day, from dawn until sunset.

WHAT IS RAMADAN?

One month of fasting during the day, from dawn to sunset. This was declared as a decision of Islam in 624 AD.

The ninth month of the Muslim calendar, Ramadan, means “burning heat” in Arabic.

Fasting is one of the five pillars of Islam, the compulsory acts that form the basis of Muslim life.

The other pillars are faith, prayer, charity and the pilgrimage to Mecca.

Fasting means abstaining from eating, drinking, smoking, making love, swearing, gossiping or other guilty acts during the day.

Meals are served before dawn and after sunset.

The meal before dawn is called sufur, the meal after sunset is known as iftar.

However, key moments in the holy month, such as community prayers and Iftar – a meal taken after sunset to break the fast of the day – are traditions that Muslims will not be able to participate in this year.

Mosques, as well as churches and synagogues, were closed and worshipers said not to congregate as the pandemic continues to affect communities across the country.

Health Secretary Matt Hancock thanked British Muslims for their service and “sacrifice” by giving up community events during Ramadan due to the isolation.

“This Ramadan, many Muslims who serve their country in the NHS and in the military and in so many other ways, will not share the joy of this month as they normally do,” he said.

“I want to say to all British Muslims: thank you for staying at home.

“I know how important the daily Ifar is, how important the community prayers are at night and how important the Eid festival is.

“Thank you for making major changes to these vital parts of your practice and I want to say to all of you: Ramadan Mubarak and thank you for your service and your citizenship, and thank you for your sacrifice. “

Health Secretary Matt Hancock thanked British Muslims for their service and

Health Secretary Matt Hancock thanked British Muslims for their service and “sacrifice”

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