Mayo Clinic launches blood test to find out who has recovered and may be immune to the coronavirus

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While the Mayo Clinic is conducting tests for a blood test that could detect people immune to the coronavirus, Dr. Bill Morice, president of the Mayo Clinic laboratories, explained how it would work.

“Unlike the molecular test that detects the virus itself, the serological test is a blood test that we use to identify those who have been exposed to [SARS-CoV-2] virus that causes COVID disease and has also caused an immune response, “Morice told” Fox & Friends “.

Morice went on to say that, therefore, the “serological test” will allow doctors to identify those who have been exposed and those who are potentially immune to the virus.

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Morice said the blood test will be able to detect that someone has had the coronavirus even if they are asymptomatic.

“About a week to two weeks after being exposed or having symptoms and even if you don’t have symptoms with the virus, your body during this period mounts a response. Part of this response is the production of a protein called an antibody specific to the SARS virus. “

Morice continued, “And what we do is we test the blood for specific antibodies to the virus and if you have any in your blood, we know that you have been exposed and that you have triggered an immune response . “

In addition, Morice said that recovered patients and those who have an immune response with antibodies can donate their plasma, a treatment called anti-convalescent plasma.

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“This will help identify those who can be donors to help those who are truly suffering from COVID,” said Morice.

Morice said the test will be applied first to health workers once it is ready to launch.

Meanwhile, the New York Blood Center has called on patients recovered from COVID-19 to donate their blood plasma to help treat others severely affected by the disease.

“In treatment, called convalescent plasma, the patient is transfused with the donor plasma to use the donor’s antibodies to help clear the virus more quickly and reduce the need for ICU beds and ventilators,” said the New York Blood Center. said in a statement to Fox News.

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the treatment on March 24.

James Rogers of Fox News contributed to this report.

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