Louis Vuitton and Barbour help produce masks and gowns for NHS staff struggling with coronavirus

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The titans of the Louis Vuitton fashion house have become the latest brand to join the fight against the coronavirus, joining the British brand Barbour by offering to use their supply line to produce 100,000 masks per week.

Widely regarded as the royalty of fashion, Louis Vuitton has now reopened a number of its production sites to help manufacture large-scale protective gear.

The news comes in the wake of the British label Barbour announcing that its staff has been responsible for producing clothing to support the local NHS Trusts in the fight against COVID-19.

NHS employees have already thanked the luxury clothing brand for transforming its factory into a PPE production line and for delivering smocks to hospitals in the Northeast.

In collaboration with the Royal Victoria Infirmary of Newcastle, its Bede Industrial Estate factory in Jarrow, south of Tyneside, produced a number of disposable dresses which have now been delivered to grateful staff.

Protective gowns will now be provided by the brand

Vital life masks should be produced in bulk

Louis Vuitton has become the last brand, alongside Barbour, to join the battle of COVID-19

The power of fashion now uses its production lines to equip medical workers

The power of fashion now uses its production lines to equip medical workers

Michael Burke (right), CEO of Louis Vuitton shows a protective gown, while the company makes PPE masks and gowns to fight against coronavirus

Michael Burke (right), CEO of Louis Vuitton shows a protective gown, while the company makes PPE masks and gowns to fight against coronavirus

British heritage brand Barbour is now waging the battle on the country's shores, sending branded packaging, stamped with the royal seal of approval, to hospitals in the North East

British heritage brand Barbour is now waging the battle on the country’s shores, sending branded packaging, stamped with the royal seal of approval, to hospitals in the North East

In the photo: a file image of a Barbour waxed jacket that changes grip to produce PPE for nurses and other health professionals

In the photo: a file image of a Barbour waxed jacket that changes grip to produce PPE for nurses and other health professionals

The navy dresses arrived in Barbour branded packaging, stamped with the royal seal of approval.

Dr. Alice Wort tweeted, “Thank you @Barbour. You deserve these royal badges. The quality of these new dresses is incredible. They are very important to our staff. Proud of our British manufacturers. ‘

The Deputy Director of Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Gateshead added: “A lot of enthusiasm at the reception of our first batch of‘ by royal nomination ’dresses from @Barbour – thank you very much, we especially like the appropriate Barbour headlines!

“It is fantastic to see how the whole region is working together to support the NHS. And microbiologist Lucía Pareja Cebrián said, “The fantastic support from @Barbour has delivered great dresses for our front line staff @NewcastleHosps. Truly grateful for their time and effort, helping us save lives.

Pictured: Barbour factory in Jarrow, which now manufactures dresses for NHS workers

Pictured: Barbour factory in Jarrow, which now makes dresses for NHS workers

Barbour teamed up with the Royal Victoria Infirmary on its first batch of dresses (file image of a Barbour jacket)

Barbour teamed up with the Royal Victoria Infirmary on its first batch of dresses (file image of a Barbour jacket)

Barbour will now scale up production of gowns and scrubs for IVR and other NHS trusts in the Northeast to support front line medical personnel who are in urgent need of these items.

Company President Dame Margaret Barbour said, “Everyone has a role to play in the fight against COVID-19 and I wanted my daughter Helen and I to play our part by turning our factory in South Shields to produce PPE products for the NHS.

“The well-being of our staff is our most important priority and we have undertaken a strict risk assessment to ensure that we respect social distance and that they are fully protected while assuming this important role.

“I am very grateful to my staff for their immense support. The factory, where we normally manufacture our classic wax jackets, is no stranger to adaptation.

“During the two world wars, we turned over the factory to make military clothing to support the war effort.

“We are delighted to be able to make a difference again and this time to support the NHS.”

Nurses were photographed carrying bags of clinical waste on their heads at Northwick Park Hospital, which declared an emergency at the end of March when he lacked intensive care beds.

Nurses were photographed carrying bags of clinical waste on their heads at Northwick Park Hospital, which declared an emergency at the end of March when there was a shortage of intensive care beds.

Commenting on his own evolution in the production of protective masks, Louis Vuitton wrote in a press release: “In order to provide protective equipment to healthcare workers, Louis Vuitton redirected several of the house workshops across France to produce hundreds of thousands of non-surgical face masks. .

“In partnership with the Mode Ouest textile network, this initiative will donate essential protective equipment to front-line health professionals. Thank you to the hundreds of artisans who volunteered to create these masks, as well as to all who have done their part to fight this global pandemic.

The government has said that current PPE supplies have been supplemented by £ 1.2 million worth of glasses and masks donated by companies, including B&Q.

Twenty-four healthcare workers died after contracting covid-19 while Health Secretary Matt Hancock was criticized for the lack of PPE available to workers.

Earlier in the crisis, before private companies intervened in nurses, bags of clinical waste were seen on the head and feet at Northwick Park Hospital in Harrow, London, as he was overwhelmed by patients with coronavirus.

Desperate nurses continue to make urgent calls for appropriate masks, gowns and gloves amid concerns about an insufficient supply.

The Royal College of Nursing told nurses yesterday that they could refuse to treat patients with coronavirus if personal protective equipment was inadequate.

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