Inside the white living room of Windsor Castle where the Queen gave a speech on coronaviruses

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The Queen offered a message of hope and unity in a televised speech broadcast to the nation last night.

The speech was pre-recorded in the white drawing room of Windsor Castle, where the Queen, 93, and the Duke of Edinburgh, 98, are currently in joint segregation during the isolation of the coronavirus.

The White Drawing Room is one of three semi-public rooms created as private apartments for George IV. They feature interiors decorated by Morel & Seddon, with a selection of furniture and accessories from Carlton House, the former London residence of George IV. The rooms, which also include the Crimson and Green lounges, are now used by the Queen for formal receptions.

The White Drawing Room also served as the backdrop for the wedding photos of Prince Charles and the Duchess of Cornwall, Princess Eugenie and Jack Brooksbank.

A closer look at the play reveals how the Queen chose to surround herself with royal history for her address, from an ornate 18th-century cabinet to a carpet that survived the devastating fire at Windsor Castle in 1992 .

The Queen delivered her pre-recorded speech from the White Drawing Room at Windsor Castle. In the photo: 1. Wooden desk used in the Queen's Christmas speech; 2. Silver pen box; 3. Flowerpot with small red flowers; 4. Ceramic lamp base; 5. Folding screen with four panels; 6. White striped armchair 7. 18th century wardrobe; 8. Candelabra on gold base; 9. (Out of plan) portrait of a young boy with sword; 10. Axminster carpet that survived the 1992 Windsor Castle fire

The Queen delivered her pre-recorded speech from the White Drawing Room at Windsor Castle. In the photo: 1. Wooden desk used in the Queen’s Christmas speech; 2. Silver pen box; 3. Flowerpot with small red flowers; 4. Ceramic lamp base; 5. Folding screen with four panels; 6. White striped armchair 7. 18th century wardrobe; 8. Candelabra on gold base; 9. (Out of plan) portrait of a young boy with sword; 10. Axminster carpet which survived the fire at Windsor Castle in 1992

1. Wooden desk

As is typical of televised speech, the queen was filmed seated at a desk. It is the same varnished wooden desk that appeared in Her Majesty’s Christmas speech 2019.

2. Silver pen box

For her annual Christmas speech, the Queen is surrounded by a selection of carefully selected family photos displayed on the desk for the public to see. However, the royal family chose not to decorate the office this way for this speech, hinting at the more formal tone. Instead, there is a black leather office rug with a blank pad of paper and a plain silver pen box. The box also appeared in his Christmas speech last year.

3. Flowerpot with red roses

At the corner of the desk is a simple white and blue ceramic flowerpot filled with flowers. The flowers are thought to be a variety of miniature roses.

4. Table lamp

To create a feeling of privacy in the large space, a round side table has been placed behind Her Majesty. The table is clear, with the exception of a single white ceramic table lamp that was moved elsewhere in the room. It has been installed in the White Drawing Room for more than 30 years and appeared in a photograph taken in 1987 of the Queen and Prince Philip to mark their wedding anniversary in ruby.

5. Screen with four panels

In the background of the photograph, there is a part of a screen with four panels which is used to divide the large living room. The folding screen is seen in a different position in the White Drawing Room in 1992

In the background of the photograph, there is a part of a screen with four panels which is used to divide the large living room. The folding screen is seen in a different position in the White Drawing Room in 1992

In the background of the photograph, there is a part of a screen with four panels which is used to divide the large living room. Although this is not distinguishable in this photo, displayed on each of the screens is a series of scenes.

6. White striped armchair

Behind Her Majesty is a simple white armchair, part of a pair housed in the White Drawing Room. Chairs are moved into space as needed to accommodate a variable number of guests. The armchair is upholstered in a fabric with a shiny finish, similar to satin. They correspond to a blue three-seater sofa in a similar fabric.

7. Oak cabinet, circa. 1783

The details of the cabinet seen in the background of the Queen's video, on the photo, are not known

However, it looks surprisingly like the one designed by Martin Carlin (1730-85), in the photo, which was designed around. 1783

The details of the cabinet seen in the background of the Queen’s video (left) are not known, but it strikingly resembles that designed by Martin Carlin (1730-85), on the right, which was designed towards. 1783. The cabinets are seen above in a 1997 image

This wardrobe is part of a pair, which are often positioned on either side of the large double doors that lead from the white living room to the crimson living room and the green living room. The other piece of furniture in the set is an oak piece of furniture veneered with tulip wood, purple, mahogany and boxwood; fitted with brocatello marble, meticulously carved gilt bronze mounts and ten soft porcelain plates. The cabinet was designed by Martin Carlin (1730-85). The similarities between the two suggest that they could have been made by the same craftsman around the same time, although this is unconfirmed.

8. Pair of candelabras

At the top right of the image is the golden base of a candelabra. The light fixture takes the form of a man, although only the feet are visible. In the photo, the candelabra seen in the photo of the queen

The matching pair

At the top right of the image is the golden base of a candelabra. The light fixture takes the form of a man, although only the feet are visible. In the photo, the candelabra seen in the photo of the queen (on the left in a 1997 image) and the matching pair (on the right)

The gold base of a candelabra has just been seen at the top right of the image. The light fixture takes the form of a man, although only the feet are visible. It is part of a set that is moved into the White Drawing Room as needed.

9. Portrait of a child with sword

Out of frame at the top of the image is the portrait of a young child holding a sword, although it is unclear who he represents

Out of frame at the top of the image is the portrait of a young child holding a sword, although it is unclear who he represents

Out of frame at the top of the image is a portrait of a young child holding a sword, although it is unknown who he represents. The same painting appears in the background of the wedding photos of Princess Eugenie and Jack Brooksbank.

10. The carpet survived the great fire

The floor of the White Drawing Room is covered with a carpet from the famous manufacturer Axminster Carpets in Devon which dates back to at least 1890. The carpet was damaged by the smoke from the fire at Windsor Castle in 1992, but has since been restored .

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