In France, a new application helps doctors to remotely monitor patients with COVID-19: NPR

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People work at a Covidom call center, a new remote medical monitoring app, inside the Picpus Campus of Paris public hospitals last month.

Geoffroy Van Der Hasselt / AFP via Getty Images

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Geoffroy Van Der Hasselt / AFP via Getty Images

People work at a Covidom call center, a new remote medical monitoring app, inside the Picpus Campus of Paris public hospitals last month.

Geoffroy Van Der Hasselt / AFP via Getty Images

On a sunny weekend in mid-March, just a few days before President Emmanuel Macron locked France out to help slow the spread of the coronavirus, Daphne Rousseau, 32, was outside Paris, lunch in the countryside with a group of friends.

“Everyone was talking about the coronavirus, then suddenly after lunch, I started to feel a little weird,” she said. “After a few hours, it was obvious that something was wrong because I had breathlessness for the first time in my life – which is very, very unusual to feel when you have never suffered from asthma or problems with your lungs. ”

That night, Rousseau had to go to bed to breathe.

“I felt very dizzy,” she says. “I felt my lungs were doing half the work – as if only half of what needed to get into my lungs was going through my lungs. “

Daphne Rousseau is waiting for a friend who comes to drop off food and take out the trash.

Daphne Rousseau

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Daphne Rousseau

Daphne Rousseau is waiting for a friend who comes to drop off food and take out the trash.

Daphne Rousseau

Rousseau called the medical emergency line. It took 49 minutes to pass. The coronavirus wave was beginning to sweep over France. A doctor finally came to her apartment, examined her, and diagnosed COVID without doing a blood test.

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