Health Secretary Matt Hancock vows not to rest until NHS doctors get the masks and gowns they need

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Matt Hancock has vowed “we will not rest” to provide essential protective equipment to NHS staff today as the main nurses union told members that they may refuse to treat coronavirus patients ‘they felt in danger.

The Secretary of Health was under increasing pressure at the daily press conference this afternoon as he revealed that pressurized units had to wait an average of two and a half days to be resupplied with personal protective equipment (PPE) ).

He spoke after the Royal College of Nursing (RCN) advised members to refuse to treat coronavirus patients as a “last resort” amid claims that essentials such as masks, glasses and gowns still did not reach the front lines.

A union spokesman admitted that the suspension of treatment “would go against all instincts”, but added that “their safety must not be compromised”.

A nurse, Becky Usher, 38, who works at Dewsbury and District Hospital in West Yorkshire, remains critically ill under a ventilator after treating patients without a mask.

Asked about the provision of PPE and whether the government could commit to a date to deliver more PPE, Mr. Hancock said, “It is impossible because the quest is to get the right PPE to the right people on the front line at the right time several million people through the NHS and social services.

“I’m happy to say that efforts are going in the right direction, we now have record amounts of PPE that have been put into the system, but until everyone gets the PPE they need, we will not rest. “

Asked about the provision of PPE and whether the government could commit to a date to deliver more PPE, Mr. Hancock said: until everyone gets the PPE they need, we will not we will not rest.

Asked about the provision of PPE and whether the government could commit to a date to deliver more PPE, Mr. Hancock said: until everyone gets the PPE they need, we will not we will not rest.

Becky Usher, 38, is in intensive care at Pinderfields Hospital in Wakefield, Yorkshire, after treating a patient without protective equipment at Dewsbury and District Hospital

Becky Usher, 38, is in intensive care at Pinderfields Hospital in Wakefield, Yorkshire. Experienced nurse Julie Omar has died, Worcester NHS Trust confirmed

Ms. Usher, who has a six-year-old daughter, pictured with partner Martin Parker

Ms. Usher, who has a six-year-old daughter, pictured with partner Martin Parker

Current international death toll from coronavirus

Current international death toll from coronavirus

Hancock said it was a “huge effort” and that experts are currently trying to find more dresses.

Crisis when half of Welsh hospital A&E staff test positive for coronavirus

A hospital is in turmoil after 50% of its A&E staff have contacted the coronavirus, a doctor said.

Consultant Tim & Anderson of the Royal Gwent Hospital in Newport, Wales, an A&E consultant, “approximately’ 50 percent “of hospital staff now tested positive for Covid-19.

In a video shared by the Aneurin Bevan University health council on Saturday, the doctor said: “This obviously happened despite all the PPE we have and all the hand washing we do, but it’s probably just a probability thing that will happen when we are faced with such a large number of patients who arrive with a coronavirus.

We probably represent up to about 50% of the Gwent A&E consulting workforce who are positive for coronavirus and a similar percentage in our nursing team.

“It is difficult to recruit staff when we have to deal with these numbers.”

The shocking revelation comes as the UK continues to face the spike in coronavirus cases that reached 84,279.

He added, “Often they don’t get thanks, the contracting experts because they’re not on the front line, but by God do we need them to make sure we can get everything EAR. “

He also denied that the government had been too slow to stock PPE earlier in the coronavirus outbreak and said the supplies were “important”.

He said, “We have tackled this with inventory, and the logistical challenges are having previously had an organization serving just over 200 NHS organizations and the demand for and need for PPE. PPE have grown tremendously and there are now 58,000 organizations in this huge logistics service operation.

“So it’s a logistical as well as a supply challenge.”

He added: “At the same time, of course, we have to replenish the stocks we went with, so we actually used fairly large stocks, but of course, given the large quantities that we distribute through the system we let’s use these stocks.

The health secretary was also asked about the speed of delivery of the PPE, which is said to have lasted two and a half days.

Hancock said the figure of two and a half days was an average for those who called the PEP 24/7 hotline and that urgent cases were dealt with “immediately”.

Ms. Usher, who has a six-year-old daughter, started to suffer from high temperature and sore throat after spending two days treating a patient who had not been tested for the virus.

When she began to have trouble breathing and speaking her words on Tuesday, she was rushed to Pinderfields Hospital in Wakefield, where she is still in intensive care.

The mother of a six-year-old daughter suffers from an irregular heartbeat that has caused multiple heart attacks since 2004.

Labor leader Keir Starmer supported the nurses’ demands and criticized the government, saying there is a “disconnect” between what Secretary of Health Matt Hancock says and front-line reports.

A third of surgeons treat patients without sufficient protective equipment, revealed a survey of 2000 front-line workers carried out by the MRC.

Business secretary Alok Sharma insisted on Sky’s Ridge on Sunday to send PPE to hospitals.

“It is right that no healthcare professional should be placed in the position where they have to make this choice,” he said.

“For me, it goes without saying. This is why we make sure that the equipment is put on the front line. “

He added: “I fully accept that it is up to the government to resolve this. “

Later, rather than admitting any flaws in government, he told BBC Marr: “I am incredibly sorry that people feel they are unable to get this equipment. “

Business secretary Alok Sharma told Sky's Ridge on Sunday,

Secretary of Business Alok Sharma told Sky’s Ridge on Sunday: “It is right that no healthcare professional should be placed in the position where he or she must make this choice.

Mrs. Usher pictured with her sister Kelly Cardwell. She said that the family was heartbroken, that she could not be by her side when she was in the hospital.

Mrs. Usher pictured with her sister Kelly Cardwell. She said the family was heartbroken, that she couldn’t be by her side when she was in the hospital.

Usher’s sister Kelly Cardwell, 42, said the family was heartbroken because they could not be by her side in the hospital, where she remains in critical but stable condition.

“The hardest part is not being able to see her and not seeing my parents, thinking that we may never see her again,” said Kelly.

“Becky is bubbly, outgoing and has a heart of gold. She is also very stubborn and fighting. “She is extremely popular and has so many friends who wish her good luck. She will be overwhelmed by the positivity and support she has received.

Kelly said hospital staff, led by the Mid Yorkshire Hospitals NHS Trust, told staff that they “did not need” protective gear because “there were no patients with coronavirus, “reports the Yorkshire Evening Post.

“I think they have it now, but obviously a few days too late,” she said.

Kelly congratulated her sister’s other NHS heroes on the frontline, fighting the coronavirus, which killed at least 19 NHS workers.

“For the other NHS angels and the key workers who support everyone through this troubling and difficult time, we cannot thank you enough for the risk you take to save the lives of others,” she said. declared.

Kelly wrote a card for her sister asking her to `` get well soon ''

Get the card soon

Kelly wrote a card for her sister asking her to “get well soon” (photo above)

“Know how much everyone really appreciates the sacrifice you make every day. ICU staff do a great job and we are grateful for the support Becky receives.

Kelly posted a card in hand with a big red heart inside Pinderfields, urging her sister to “keep fighting.”

Becky’s partner, Martin Parker, 40, said, “She warned me when the paramedics arrived. She said she was fine, but I knew she was not.

“The paramedic said” tell him you’re going home, but you’re going to the hospital “. “

“I miss her and I love her. “

The government has been strongly criticized for not doing enough to provide front-line personnel with personal protective equipment.

MailOnline contacted Mid Yorkshire NHS Trust for a comment.

New Labor leader Sir Keir Starmer has criticized the government, saying: `` It would be smart for the government to recognize its ambition that the equipment is where it should be is not matched, and apologizes for it and continues . ''

New Labor leader Sir Keir Starmer has criticized the government, saying, “It would be smart for the government to acknowledge its ambition that the equipment is where it should be gone, and apologizes for it and continues. “

Senior NHS officials said hospitals may run out of doctors’ coats after Priti Patel last night, she is “sorry if people think there have been failures” in the provision of protective equipment.

A third of surgeons do not have sufficient protective equipment, according to a survey

A third of surgeons and trainees across the UK don’t think they have an adequate supply of protective equipment to do their jobs safely, new research shows.

A survey of nearly 2,000 surgeons and surgical trainees, released on Sunday, also found that 57% of those surveyed said there had been shortages of personal protective equipment (PPE) in their organization during of the last 30 days.

The survey, conducted by the Royal College of Surgeons (RCS), also found that 72% of those surveyed believed that large-scale population testing would be necessary before the foreclosure ended in the UK.

RCS figures showed a wide regional variation in the experience of surgeons, with more than half in the Thames Valley declaring that they now have access to adequate PPE, compared to about a third in the North West.

In London, 33% of those polled said they did not think their confidence in the NHS had an adequate supply of protective equipment.

The college warned that access to protective gear should not be a postal code lottery.

Vice President Sue Hill said there is still a lot of work to be done to secure an adequate supply of front-line equipment.

She added: “Things are generally going in the right direction, with fewer surgeons telling us that there is currently an insufficient supply of PPE in their confidence, compared to last month.

“But progress in this rapidly evolving crisis seems painfully slow.

“The supply of PPE does not have to be a zip code lottery – the hardest hit areas need more kits, quickly.”

The memos released today have warned of a “national shortage” of long-sleeved dresses needed to treat patients with coronavirus.

The revelation came when the government asked all companies that can make dressing gowns to sign up for their new plan to produce personal protective equipment.

The Kingston Hospital NHS Foundation Trust said in correspondence with The Telegraph that supplies of gowns may run out this weekend.

The news came hours after Public Health England relaxed its rules and said doctors could get away with one-piece coveralls with a hood if dresses were not available.

But the new Labor leader, Sir Keir Starmer, criticized the government, there is a “lag” in what Health Secretary Matt Hancock and front line NHS staff say about the availability of PPE.

He said, “It is a difficult exercise, I understand that the government is trying to take up the challenge here, but there is a lag and that is the kind of thing that Parliament must pursue through individual members of Parliament who submit points to ministers. “

Sir Keir, asked if nurses should follow the advice of the Royal College of Nursing and effectively refuse to treat patients with coronavirus if they do not have the proper protective equipment and clothing, replied, “They are able to give advice to those in their association and they should give this guidance.

Interior Minister Priti Patel said last night that she was sorry if anyone thought there had been failures in the provision of personal protective equipment (PPE) for health workers in the fight against the coronavirus pandemic.

In an email sent Thursday evening, Martin Barkley, general manager of Mid Yorkshire, said: “I fully recognize the staff’s enormous concern over this issue. Every day you get to work, leave your family, put yourself in a position that must seem vulnerable and scary to you to do the right thing for our patients. I want to assure you that the trust is doing everything in its power to guarantee new stocks. “

The government has called on all industries to ask all companies that can produce protective equipment to come forward.

Interior Minister Priti Patel said she was sorry if anyone thought there had been failures in the provision of personal protective equipment (PPE) for health workers in the fight against the coronavirus pandemic

Interior Minister Priti Patel said she was sorry if anyone thought there had been failures in the provision of personal protective equipment (PPE) for health workers in the fight against the coronavirus pandemic

The memos that were leaked today warned of a

The memos released today have warned of a “national shortage” of long-sleeved dresses needed to treat patients with coronavirus. Stock Photo

Firefighters and the military have been mobilized to improve the distribution of supplies, but health officials still fear there may not be enough to get around.

A senior official involved told the Telegraph that London hospitals had been forced to negotiate directly with companies in China in a desperate attempt to source more from them.

“The big university hospitals went shopping in China, wherever they could get their hands on these products, order planes and negotiate with Chinese companies.

“This is one of the largest trading markets outside of a trading room that no one has ever seen.”

This comes after Health Secretary Matt Hancock confirmed that 19 NHS workers have now lost their lives after contracting Covid-19.

The government has been criticized since the pandemic hit the coast of the United Kingdom for not having enough PPE available to health workers, especially those who work in social services.

Patel, responding to questions at a briefing in Downing Street on Saturday, said she was “sorry” if people thought there had been failures in the provision of PPE.

After being asked twice to apologize to NHS staff and their families for the lack of PPE required, Ms. Patel said, “I am sorry if people think there have been failures. I will be very, very clear about this.

“But at the same time, we are currently experiencing an unprecedented global health pandemic.

“It is inevitable that the demand and pressures on PPE and the demand for PPE will be exponential. They’re going to be incredibly high.

Piers Morgan reacted furiously to the Interior Minister's

Piers Morgan reacted furiously to the Interior Minister’s “apologies”

“And of course we are trying to solve this problem as a government.”

Piers Morgan reacted furiously to his “apology” by tweeting: “Pitiful words of non-apology for the government’s shameful failure to properly protect our NHS personnel. “

Ms. Patel’s so-called apologies come after a dispute broke out between the government and the nurses after Matt Hancock again warned coronavirus doctors against the excessive use of personal protective equipment.

The health secretary insisted that there was enough protective clothing to meet the demand, but urged health workers to treat the equipment as a “precious” resource.

His remarks, made this morning on a radio broadcast, doubled compared to comments made yesterday at the Downing Street press conference, where he responded to front-line reports of a serious equipment shortage.

The Secretary of Health insisted that there was enough equipment to meet the demand, but that it should be treated by hospitals as a

The Secretary of Health insisted that there was enough equipment to meet the demand, but that it should be treated by hospitals as a “precious resource”

But today he encountered a ferocious reaction led by a senior nurse who berated the minister for suggestions that NHS staff were moving away from advice.

Front line health workers are “dehydrated” because they skip drinks so as not to waste their personal protective equipment, said an intensive care nurse.

The nurse, who requested anonymity, said the staff felt that they were “being lied to” about the masks and that the situation was being dealt with “horribly”.

The health worker, from Manchester, responded to suggestions from the staff wasting equipment and said that those working in his department were afraid to take off their masks for drinking, as this means they should be thrown away, which increases the risk of dehydration.

She said, “We are lied to about the masks we make and don’t have, and they hide the ones we miss.

“We cannot eat or drink enough because we cannot have water or snacks in the area and cannot remove our masks.

“And we are too afraid of drinking too much when we are out because if we have to go to the bathroom it means we have to take it all out again and waste it, then we are all horribly dehydrated.” “

The Secretary General of the Royal College of Nursing, Dame Donna Kinnair, also said that no amount of PPE is a more precious resource than the life of a health worker, the life of a nurse, the life from a doctor.

She told BBC Breakfast, “I am actually offended that we are saying that health care workers abuse or abuse PPE.

“I think what we do know is that we don’t have enough supply and not enough regular PPE supply.

“This is the number one priority that nurses bring to my attention, that they do not have enough protective gear.”

Reports have emerged from the front lines of health workers forced to treat patients in homemade protective gear made of trash bags and curtains.

Hancock said yesterday that there was a sufficient supply of face masks, gowns and gloves, but admitted that their distribution proved “Herculean logistical effort”.

During the broad series of morning broadcasts by the Secretary of Health:

  • Hancock revealed that 19 NHS workers have so far lost their lives with the virus;
  • Although the hospital admissions rate has stabilized, he has begged the public to stay indoors this Easter weekend;
  • He said no one knows if we will reach the peak of the epidemic or when we will;
  • The minister denied reports that he and his team had not observed measures of social distancing;
  • Hancock declined to know if the government had been slow to initiate the lockdown.
Dame Donna Kinnair, Secretary General of the Royal College of Nursing, berated the Minister for saying that there had been

Dame Donna Kinnair, Secretary General of the Royal College of Nursing, berated the Minister for saying that there had been “examples” of overuse of PPE

NHS England medical director Stephen Powis said he was confident there would be enough high-tech FFP3 masks available to cover the duration of the pandemic.

He also said officials are “working very hard” on the supply of overalls, the use of which has been extended in light of last week’s updated guidelines.

Sir Ed Davey, Acting Lib Dems chief, criticized the government’s response to PPE, which saw the military mobilized to distribute more than 760 million items across the country.

“The lack of sufficient protective equipment is becoming a national scandal – many health and care workers clearly feel that they have been sold downstream,” he said.

At yesterday’s press conference number 10, the Secretary of Health said that the UK supply of PPE is stretching to meet demand if the “precious resource” is “used as directed” .

Despite an overnight reaction to suggestions that NHS staff flouted these rules, Hancock doubled his remarks this morning.

He told BBC Radio 4: “It is really important that people do not use PPE either.

“I don’t want to blame people who have used more PPE than the guidelines suggest because I understand the difficulties under the circumstances.

“What I would say is very important to use the right PPE and not to abuse it.

“Sure, there have been examples but I don’t want to point that out because I also understand the circumstances under which people could have used more PPE than was strictly necessary as directed. “

The new Labor leader, Sir Keir Starmer, also spoke to condemn Mr. Hancock’s remarks as “insulting”.

He added, “It is frankly insulting to imply that front-line staff are wasting PPE.

“There are horrific stories where NHS staff and caregivers do not have the equipment they need to keep themselves safe.

“The government must act to ensure the delivery of supplies.”

PPE nurses applaud video at West Cumberland Hospital coronavirus department

PPE nurses applaud video at West Cumberland Hospital coronavirus department

The dispute arises as the government urges the public to stay home over Easter after the UK has recorded its highest number of daily deaths from coronavirus since the start of the epidemic.

The latest figures from the Ministry of Health and Welfare have shown that on Thursday there were 8,958 hospital deaths from the disease – an increase from 980 the day before.

Mr. Hancock also said it was still too early to determine whether the peak of UK coronavirus infections had been reached.

He told BBC Radio 4 Today: “The good news is that we have seen the number of hospital admissions begin to begin – to begin, I emphasize – to flatten.

“You can see (from government charts) that instead of increasing exponentially, as they would have if we hadn’t taken the steps, they are starting to drop and flatten.

“We haven’t seen enough to trust to make changes.

“The answer to your question, whether we have reached the top, is that no one knows.

Asked about the chief scientific adviser, Sir Patrick Vallance, saying that the United Kingdom was two weeks from the summit, Mr. Hancock added: “Our judgment is that we are not there yet and that we have not seen enough flattening to be able to say we have reached the top.

Hancock has dismissed accusations that the UK has been slow to initiate the foreclosure.

He said comparisons with Italy, which imposed social isolation weeks before Britain, were useless because Rome was far ahead of that country in the explosion of cases.

The health secretary unfortunately confirmed that 19 NHS employees died from the coronavirus.

Hancock told BBC Breakfast on Saturday, “My hearts go out to their families. They are people who have come to the fore.

“Work continues to determine whether they have caught a coronavirus while performing their duties at work or whether, like so many others, have caught it for the rest of their lives.

“It is obviously quite difficult to solve this problem. What matters is that we pay tribute to their service. “

Hancock also denied reports that he and his team of advisers did not observe social distancing during their meetings.

He insisted that he had worked at home as much as possible, but when he had to go to the office, he had deployed the chairs to avoid any person-to-person contact.

Police also revealed that 1,084 on-the-spot fines were imposed for violations of coronavirus regulations in England and Wales.

Martin Hewitt, president of the National Council of Chiefs of Police, said that only a “small minority” had not followed government instructions.

Johnson announced three weeks ago a travel ban that prohibited people from traveling outside the home, except exercise, to buy essentials, to go to work that cannot be done at home or to provide care.

The fines were imposed by 37 forces, said Hewitt, with a 21% drop in overall crime.

The announcement came after certain forces were criticized for being severe in the use of enhanced enforcement powers, with a backlash on social networks against the use of drones to patrol places of beauty and agents seen monitoring supermarket aisles.

“In all of these forces, this averages less than 84 per day,” said Hewitt at the press conference.

“This shows that the overwhelming majority of people abide by the rules and stay at home to protect the NHS and save lives. “

Hewitt said police will release fortnightly law enforcement data during the crisis and defended forces that “made mistakes”, saying they “quickly tried to fix them” .

So far, ministers have ruled out setting a date on which restrictions on movement and social contact will be removed, with Hancock and Patel stressing the need for people to stay at home even during good weather over the weekend. weekend.

The news came after the Department of Health said a total of 9,875 people had died in hospital in the UK after being tested positive for the coronavirus on Friday at 5 p.m., up 917 from at the same point on Thursday.

Johnson continues to recover after his discharge from the intensive care unit at St Thomas Hospital where he was treated for coronavirus.

Patel said the cabinet has argued that the PM takes time to rest.

“The message to the Prime Minister is that we want him to get better and that he needs time and space to rest, recover and recover,” she said.

Number 10 refused to know how long he should stay in the hospital.

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