Food shortages? No, too much food in the wrong places: salt: NPR

0
81


Last week, employees of the Together Inc. food bank distributed food at a service location in Omaha, New Brunswick. Disruptions to the agricultural supply chain caused by the coronavirus pandemic make it difficult for food banks.

Nati Harnik / AP

hide legend

toggle legend

Nati Harnik / AP

Last week, employees of the Together Inc. food bank distributed food at a service location in Omaha, New Brunswick. Disruptions to the agricultural supply chain caused by the coronavirus pandemic make it difficult for food banks.

Nati Harnik / AP

In recent days, senior US government officials have taken steps to assure Americans that they will not run out of food, despite the coronavirus.

While visiting a Walmart distribution center, Vice President Mike Pence announced that “the US food supply is solid.” FDA Assistant Food Commissioner Frank Yiannas (a former Walmart executive) told reporters on a teleconference that “there is no general or national food shortage, despite local reports from breakdowns “.

“There is no need to hoard,” said Yiannas.

In fact, the pandemic has caused entirely different problems: an increase in the number of people who cannot afford to shop and an overabundance of food where it is not needed.

Dairy farmers in Wisconsin, Minnesota and Georgia have been forced to dump thousands of gallons of milk that no one will buy. In Florida, vegetable producers are abandoning fields of tomatoes, yellow squash and cucumbers ready for harvest for the same reason.

“We can’t pick the produce if we can’t sell it because we can’t pay the payroll every week,” said Kim Jamerson, a market gardener near Fort Myers. These crops will be reinvested in the soil. “We will have to tear them apart,” says Jamerson. “Just rip beautiful vegetables that could really go elsewhere, in food banks, hospitals and nursing homes.” “

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here