Edmonton adjusts routes and pedestrian call buttons to promote physical distance – Edmonton

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The City of Edmonton is adjusting pushbuttons at pedestrian crossings and allocating shared use roads between pedestrians and vehicles in the hopes of distributing people to promote better physical distance.

As of Thursday, pedestrian signals will be automatic at 56 pedestrian intersections in the city, as well as those around hospitals. This will eliminate the need for people to press buttons at these crossings to slow the spread of COVID-19.

Signage will be posted at affected intersections. The city said the beep for the visually impaired will continue to be activated by pressing the button.

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Two roads in Edmonton will also be developed to provide more space for pedestrians and cyclists. The city hopes that this move will allow Edmontonians to meet the physical distance requirement of two meters outdoors.

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“We know it is important for Edmontonians to get out during this time and these adjustments will help them do so while maintaining a safe physical distance,” said Darryl Mullen, Acting Director of Traffic Operations for the City of Edmonton. .

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Changes happen on the following routes:

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Victoria Promenade

Along 100th Avenue, from 116th to 121st Street, the bike path will be enlarged and converted into a space for shared use for people who walk and cycle.

Saskatchewan Drive

Along Saskatchewan Drive from 105th to 109th Street, traffic will be reduced to a single lane, with the north lane converted to shared-use space for people who walk and cycle.

“We all have an important role to play in preventing the spread of COVID-19. By working together to stay away from it, whether we buy essential items or exercise outside, we can all help protect the health and safety of our community, “said Mullen.

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In a press release on Wednesday morning, the city reminded people to be aware of others when they spend time outside.

“It could mean choosing alternative times or routes for walks, skipping others in single file and withdrawing to allow others to pass,” the city said.

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Similar measures have been put in place in other Canadian cities to promote physical remoteness.

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The City of Edmonton said the teams would clear the roads of snow and ice before they open for pedestrians and cyclists on Thursday.

Changes to Promote Physical Distance on Edmonton Buses

The City of Edmonton on Tuesday also announced new measures to encourage the physical distance of city buses.

New panels are installed on some seats, closing them to passengers.

“These new signs are an additional safety measure we are using to promote the physical distance between passengers,” said Rowan Anderson, a city communications consultant.

“Only members of the same household, or a caregiver required, can sit side by side. “



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Anderson said on Tuesday afternoon that about 10 to 15 percent of the fleet in service had been fitted with the signs, with the aim of completing the entire fleet later this week.

Seats were closed on an ETS bus to track physical distance measurements in Edmonton on Tuesday April 7, 2020.

Seats were closed on an ETS bus to track physical distance measurements in Edmonton on Tuesday April 7, 2020.


Provided to Global News


Seats were closed on an ETS bus to track physical distance measurements in Edmonton on Tuesday April 7, 2020.

Seats were closed on an ETS bus to track physical distance measurements in Edmonton on Tuesday April 7, 2020.


Provided to Global News


Anderson said the signs will not be installed on LRT trains, but the city requires passengers to practice the same physical distance tag and sit in an offset position.

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“We would also like to remind Edmontonians to use public transit only for essential travel and to stay at home if possible.”

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