Dominic Raab “will tell his country on Thursday that he will face another three weeks of restrictions against coronaviruses‘

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Foreign Minister Dominic Raab is expected to announce to the country on Thursday that the coronavirus lockout will last until at least May 7.

The First Secretary of State, who replaces Boris Johnson while the Prime Minister is recovering from the deadly virus, will tell the British that they will face at least three weeks of additional restrictions.

Raab is expected to liaise with leaders of devolved countries during a Cobra meeting on Thursday, where he will demand a UK-wide approach to setting a deadline.

Senior ministers are believed to be divided on the best time to end the foreclosure and have been told to stop talking about an “exit strategy” because the death toll has not yet reached.

The tough measures are having a devastating impact on the economy, with rising unemployment rates and fewer people than the government expected to work from home.

But any decision to end the foreclosure – implemented by the Prime Minister on March 23 – must be balanced with the health consequences of letting people come into close contact again.

The latest death toll has brought the death toll in the UK to 11,329, but the daily total has now dropped for three consecutive days for the first time since the start of the epidemic.

Raab called the figures “gruesome” at the daily coronavirus press conference in Downing Street, adding that Britain was “still not beyond the peak of the virus.” He said it meant that the government could not reduce social distance.

The foreign secretary had previously been pushed back by Nicola Sturgeon, who had revealed at lunchtime that the United Kingdom was likely to prolong the lockout. It was the latest example of the Scottish Prime Minister walking past number 10.

Chief Scientific Advisor Sir Patrick Vallance added that this week would be “difficult” and he expects the daily number of deaths to increase before stabilizing, continuing to stabilize for some time and, ultimately , to fall.

Britain became only the fifth country to cross the grim threshold of 10,000 dead on Sunday – the only others to say it is the United States, Italy, Spain and France.

NHS England said its 667 hospital victims announced on Monday were between 17 and 101 years old, and 40 of them had no health problems – the youngest of whom was 37 years old.

The latest death toll is down on Sunday and the lowest since Monday last week, but a pattern emerged of deaths falling on Sunday and Monday before skyrocketing during the week.

Government scientists have said they expect the number of deaths reported every day to continue increasing until the peak of the country’s epidemic has passed. New cases and hospitalizations will fall before death.

It takes days or weeks for a death to be registered, so if the country is at its peak now – as predicted as Easter approaches – the number of deaths should not drop significantly significant for at least one more week. .

In other news on coronaviruses:

  • Prime Minister Boris Johnson has been confirmed to have tested negative for Covid-19 – it has been proven to be virus-free before leaving St Thomas Hospital and is now recovering at Checkers, his official residence in the Buckinghamshire;
  • Statistics show that one in seven people hospitalized with coronavirus in the UK will die and that the chances of survival in intensive care are 50/50;
  • China diagnosed 108 new cases of coronavirus on Monday. The number has been the highest in the country for more than five weeks and more than 90% of them have been diagnosed in travelers from other countries;
  • French President Emmanuel Macron has said that France must prepare for its lockout to last “until May”;
  • NHS staff may need to start assigning people over the age of 65 “scores” based on their medical condition to determine where they are on the intensive care waiting list if the units are overcrowded;
  • Former Governor of the Bank of England Lord Mervyn King said he was “worried” that only 4,200 companies in the UK had received crisis loans, compared to 725,000 in the United States;
  • Millions of people in Spain have been allowed to return to work as the country eases its lockdown just days after being at the center of one of the world’s fastest growing Covid epidemics;
  • The vast majority of Britons support government foreclosure rules, but fear for the future of the economy.

The foreclosure measures have been in place for almost three weeks and Raab said government experts will now assess the latest data on the epidemic in the coming days before presenting their findings to ministers.

A Cobra meeting is expected to take place on Thursday, when a final decision on an extension will be made. But there are fears in Whitehall that people are too afraid to leave their homes when the lock is finally lifted.

Majority of Britons downgrade or say it should be even tighter

The vast majority of Britons support the lockdown rules used to fight coronavirus but are increasingly worried about crippling the economy, according to a poll.

The country supports Boris Johnson’s decision to close the country on March 23, but is afraid of what it could cost.

It is understood that Foreign Minister Dominic Raab will announce on Thursday that the restrictions will last until at least May 7.

The devastating virus ravaged Britain, killing 11,329 and infecting 88,621.

Up to 19% of workers, mostly young people, have lost their jobs or have been forced to cut wages

Up to 19% of workers, mostly young people, have lost their jobs or have been forced to cut wages

The YouGov poll for the Telegraph found that 84% of respondents expected financial problems due to the foreclosure.

Up to 19% of workers, most of them younger, have lost their jobs or have been forced to earn lower wages.

The survey, which interviewed more than 2,000 Britons on Sunday, found that 48% of the country supports the government’s foreclosure measures.

An impressive 92% said they agreed, “I will likely follow government advice even if I disagree with it or find it unnecessary.” “

Yet 44% believe that the Prime Minister could have put in place tighter controls as daily updates from people who break the rules continue to emerge. Meanwhile, a higher figure reported feeling progressively lonely and unhappy as the mental health impact of the restrictions began to bite.

YouGov’s director of political research, Chris Curtis, said the results were proving difficult for policymakers, showing that people supported the foreclosure but feared for the economy if it continued.

Meanwhile, a higher number reported feeling lonely

Meanwhile, a higher number reported feeling lonely

It is understood that Mr. Johnson’s hospitalization has hammered the threat of the disease and a cabinet minister told the Telegraph that he had “added up to a week” during the lockout.

Some cabinet members have pressed for the closure situation to be assessed again next week, not next month, to show that it is planned to end, but the Prime Minister would have the final say.

Speaking at yesterday’s press conference, Raab said: “This week, SAGE [Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies] will examine the evidence for the effectiveness of the social distancing measures we have taken and we will examine their assessment on the basis of the evidence at this stage.

“I must say that we do not expect to make any changes to the measures currently in place at this stage and we will not do so until we are as confident, as confident as possible, that such changes can be made safely. security. “

The de facto PM added, “Continue to follow the instructions to stay at home, save lives and protect the NHS.

“If we give up now, the virus will only fully benefit from it. It will spread faster and kill more people.

“If we refuse to give in, if we continue this incredible team effort, we will beat this virus and pass this national test. “

Yesterday marked the first time in a month that the majority of the deaths announced did not take place in London, the Midlands counting 170 against 158 ​​in the capital.

Outside these two regions, the north-west recorded an additional 102 victims, eastern England 83, north-east and Yorkshire 79, south-east 48 and south-west 27.

Sturgeon said there were “hopeful signs” that the coronavirus lockout was working, but that restrictions should continue to keep the outbreak from getting out of hand.

She said in a briefing earlier yesterday, “There are early optimistic signs that the actions we are taking are working but until we know more, until we have solid evidence, we need to stick to it. “

Ms. Sturgeon’s comments were echoed by a professor at the University of Oxford who said that the fact that the numbers represent both a weekend and a holiday was reason to beware of giving them big hopes.

Professor James Naismith said: “Although the number of hospital deaths announced [yesterday] is lower than would have been expected if deaths continued to grow exponentially, holidays and weekends could have exacerbated the known volatility of these figures.

“We will have to see other data before we make a firm judgment on trends.

“There are inevitable and variable delays between deaths and the reporting of their deaths, which also makes it very difficult to judge the maximum number of daily deaths in the UK for the first wave until we have passed the peak.

“I expect hospital admissions to continue to show that social distancing is now clearly reducing the number of infections. We must remember that the number of deaths will increase as the deaths in nursing homes and the wider community are added. These are more difficult to measure quickly but are of course just as tragic.

“We are approaching, I hope, the summit of the first wave of COVID-19, but it will be a marathon, not a sprint. “

The number of people hospitalized for the coronavirus seems to be stabilizing, according to data presented by the government. Experts said hospitalizations would be one of the first statistics to peak when peaked

The number of people hospitalized for the coronavirus seems to be stabilizing, according to data presented by the government. Experts said hospitalizations would be one of the first statistics to peak when the peak of the epidemic was reached

LOCKED-UP EUROPE: GERMANY UNDER PRESSURE AS SPAIN RETURNS TO WORK BUT FRANCE IS PREPARING TO EXTEND QUARANTINE

Coronavirus locking is at various stages of progression in Europe, with many countries implementing strict measures before the United Kingdom and now emerging at different speeds. Here’s the last one:

SPAIN

Spain began returning to work yesterday, non-essential workers such as factory and construction workers were allowed to return to work after a two-week ban.

Police were distributing millions of masks at Spanish metro stations yesterday as some people returned to work, although the broader coronavirus blocking remains in effect.

Those who returned yesterday are metal workers, builders, cleaners, factory and shipyard workers, and people involved in sanitation and security.

Construction union says recovery of materials, wood and furniture industries will return at least 1.7 million people to work, although yesterday is a holiday in parts of Spain .

The two-week hibernation of non-essential business was imposed on March 30, making locking even more difficult than in Britain, where people have always been able to travel if they cannot work from home.

Spain was encouraged as recently as the number of new cases fell to 3,477, the least since March 20. The daily death toll also fell to 517, after surging to 619 yesterday.

FRANCE

President Emmanuel Macron was to warn France yesterday that his lockdown to fight the coronavirus should last for at least several weeks, while specifying how the country would emerge from the crisis.

Just after 8 p.m. tonight, Macron will deliver his third prime time televised speech to the nation on the epidemic from the Elysee Palace in Paris.

In his latest, he announced the national closure to slow the spread of the virus from March 17.

This speech will come after the first indications of a temporary easing of the crisis in France and that the blockage is starting to have an effect, the epidemic starting to level off, although at a high level.

Yesterday’s death toll from 561 marked a fourth consecutive day of decline, although figures for France were very erratic with data for nursing homes only partially included.

GERMANY

German Chancellor Angela Merkel is facing pressure to facilitate the locking and reopening of schools as the number of new coronavirus cases and deaths in the country continues to decrease.

Germany reported 2,537 new cases marking the third consecutive day of decline.

The country recorded 4,133 new diagnoses on Saturday and 2,821 on Sunday, with the total number of infected people reaching 123,016.

The death toll is also on its third day of decline after increasing from 126 to 2,799.

The promising figures follow shocking reports that groups of thugs attacked German police with iron bars and threw stones when the police attempted to disperse them.

Groups violated Germany’s strict lock-in rules on Friday.

A member of the group broke the window of a police car after throwing a stone at it when an officer came out to ask them to leave.

Another group of 20 people attacked an officer moments later while brandishing stones, tiles and iron bars, Deutsche Welle reported.

ITALY, DENMARK AND AUSTRIA

Italy will allow bookstores, stationery stores and stores selling children’s clothing to reopen tomorrow when the longest lock in Europe is released.

Schools and daycare centers in Denmark will reopen on Wednesday, allowing some parents to return to work.

Austria will begin easing restrictions on Tuesday, with non-essential stores under 1.5 tennis courts (4,300 square feet) allowed to reopen, as well as hardware and garden centers, Deutsche Welle reported. Other large businesses and restaurants will have to wait until May to resume operations.

The government was concerned that people would start breaking the rules for staying at home during the current holiday weekend due to the sunny weather and the so-called “crisis fatigue” that could set in.

But in a video recorded after he was discharged from hospital on Sunday, a recovering Johnson said he was amazed at how well people respected social distancing measures.

He admitted that the NHS saved his life and said, “It’s hard to find the words to express my debt – but before I get there, I want to thank everyone across the UK for the effort and the sacrifice that you made and make. .

“When the sun is up and the children are at home; when the natural world seems at its best and the outdoors is so welcoming, I can only imagine how difficult it was to follow the rules of social distancing

“Thank you because so many millions and millions of people across the country have done the right thing – millions undergoing the hardships of self-isolation – faithfully, patiently, thinking and caring for others as well as themselves.

“I want you to know that this Easter Sunday, I believe your efforts are worth it and prove their worth every day.

“Because although we mourn those who are taken from us in such large numbers every day, and although the struggle is by no means over, we are now progressing in this incredible national battle against the coronavirus.

“A fight we never chose against an enemy we still don’t fully understand. We are advancing in this national battle because the British public has formed a human shield around this country’s greatest national asset – our National Health Service.

Johnson was confirmed virus-free before leaving St. Thomas Hospital on Sunday, said Downing Street, and will now recover in Prime Minister Checkers’ official country home in Buckinghamshire.

He traveled there with his pregnant fiancée Carrie Symonds, who also recovered from the virus, albeit milder symptoms, and their dog Dilyn.

Number 10 stated that the PM had spoken to Mr. Raab “over the weekend”.

The Prime Minister’s official spokesperson said over lunch that Johnson “would not immediately return to work” and that he would be “guided by the advice of his doctors.”

The cabinet is divided on when the prime minister should return to work, and some prominent ministers have already insisted that he be involved in the decision – due Thursday – to extend the British foreclosure.

An extension of the restrictions on social separation had been considered a formality, but the duration is still to be discussed with some inflexible, it must be the decision of Mr. Johnson. However, medical experts have warned that the PM must not return to work too soon or he could risk a relapse.

Some MPs expressed concern about asking someone who had just left intensive care to make important decisions, insisting that he should “shoot all cylinders” when he returned.

Only the sickest patients are admitted to intensive care, and audits of NHS units have revealed that survival in the units is no better than 50/50. Johnson himself admitted that he sometimes felt like he “could have gone both ways.”

Although he should never have been ventilated – a sign of life-threatening illness – Mr. Johnson was seriously ill and needed 24-hour care for at least 48 hours during his darkest period.

Statistics show that one in seven people with COVID-19 in UK hospitals will die from the disease, while the ICU death rate is closer to 52%.

As of yesterday, Britain has registered 10,612 deaths from Covid-19 in NHS hospitals out of a total of around 75,774 hospitalized patients, a death rate of 14%.

Intensive care unit (ICU) reports show that the death rate for critically ill patients, many of whom require ventilators, is considerably higher, at 51.6%.

Thousands of COVID-19 patients in UK hospitals end up in intensive care, and the most common deadly problem they face is pulmonary insufficiency in which the body cannot draw enough oxygen from the blood. .

Scientists also found shock and heart or kidney failure in a third of the cases.

Since March 12, when the government stopped systematically testing people outside of hospitals, some 75,774 hospital patients have tested positive for coronavirus and 10,602 have died, resulting in a death rate of 13 , 99%.

Wales is more severely affected by coronavirus than Scotland and Northern Ireland, according to figures, with almost one in 600 people diagnosed with the virus

Wales is more severely affected by coronavirus than Scotland and Northern Ireland, according to figures, with almost 1 in 600 people diagnosed with the virus

This does not reflect how deadly the virus is because hundreds of thousands, if not millions, of British people should have caught it and contracted only a mild illness, recovering at home as if they had the influenza.

Experts, including scientists from Imperial College London and government chief medical officer Professor Chris Whitty, expect the true death rate to be less than 1% when counted real of infected people.

While the vast majority of hospital patients can recover with just support to manage their symptoms or treatment for other infections, some require intensive care.

According to the National Critical Care Research and Audit Center (ICNARC), there was information available for 3883 COVID-19 critical care admissions until Thursday, April 9.

Of these patients, 871 died and 818 came out alive, which means that more than half (51.6%) of those whose hospital treatment had ended had not survived.

108 NEW CASES IN CHINA LIGHT A SECOND WAVE

China has registered 108 new cases of coronavirus, marking its highest daily count in more than five weeks and fueling fears of a second wave.

More than 90% of these infected people entered the country from abroad after the country lifted its travel restrictions earlier this month.

The northeast border with Russia quickly became an entry point for the virus and a front line in the fight against a resurgence of the coronavirus epidemic.

China has now closed all ports of entry and exit on its 2,670-mile border with Russia after cases have started to creep into the nearby town of Suifenhe.

China registered 108 new cases of coronavirus, marking the highest daily count for more than five weeks and stoking fears of a second wave

China has registered 108 new cases of coronavirus, marking the highest daily count in more than five weeks and fueling fears of a second wave

Elsewhere, authorities have slowly eased traffic brakes as it attempts to get its economy back on track, including in Wuhan, where the coronavirus first appeared.

But the authorities draw a fine line between granting more freedom of movement and protection against a second wave of infections.

Figures from China suggest that the country has largely eradicated domestic transmission of the disease.

But he has been accused of covering the full extent of his epidemic and lying about key information at virtually every stage of his response to the coronaviruses.

The 108 new cases reported on Sunday are up from 99 a day earlier, marking the highest daily count since March 5.

Cases increased by 143 on March 5, but have since declined, reaching a record level of 11 new cases on March 13.

The total number of confirmed cases in mainland China now stands at 82,160 on Sunday and 3,341 people have died.

On the worst day of the epidemic in China, on February 12, more than 15,000 new cases were recorded after authorities changed the way the data was recorded.

Although the number of daily infections in China has dropped sharply since this peak, China has seen new daily cases go up.

It is widely attributed to international travel. The imported cases represented a record 98 of the 108 reported on Sunday.

Half involved Chinese nationals returning from the Russian Far East Federal District, which is home to the city of Vladivostok.

A resident of Suifenhe, named only Zhu, said, “Our small town here, we thought it was the safest place.

“Some Chinese citizens – they want to come back, but it doesn’t make much sense, why are you coming here? “

Most of them – 2,194 people – were still hospitalized at the time of the report.

Of those who needed ventilators – life-saving devices that pump air into the lungs when they stop working alone – only one in three survives their hospital stay.

Commenting on the high mortality rate for those in need of pulmonary assistance, Professor Duncan Young, an intensive care specialist at the University of Oxford, said: “The relative ineffectiveness of artificial ventilation may suggest that the COVID-19 causes a form of pneumonia that is particularly resistant to treatment.

“It is also possible that in some patients, COVID-19 is the cause of a multi-organ failure in which respiratory failure is the present problem but is not always the cause of death – but there is no data on this yet. “

Analysis of British COVID-19 statistics has revealed that Wales is twice as hard hit by coronavirus as Scotland and Northern Ireland.

The UK’s second smallest country has almost double the number of infections per person, compared to other countries of origin outside of England.

5,610 out of 3.1 million people in Wales were diagnosed with the life-threatening infection yesterday.

This means that more than one in 600 people have contracted the virus in Wales, compared to one in 1000 in Scotland and Northern Ireland.

Even England – the center of the British crisis, with more than 10,000 deaths and most cases – has a lower infection rate than Wales, with about one in 900 people getting the disease.

Experts say Wales’ proximity to England, as well as a tighter testing regime, are likely to be behind the increased infection rate.

Despite a population of 5.5 million – far larger than Wales – Scotland has registered 6,067 cases, 400 more.

A total of 1,882 people have been diagnosed with coronavirus in Northern Ireland, which has a population of 1.9 million.

The actual number of infections is likely to be higher across the UK, as only patients hospitalized for severe symptoms are tested.

Experts say the high infection rate in Wales may seem higher than the rest of the UK because the country tests more people per population.

Or it may be that Wales is experiencing more cases imported from England, which is suffering the full brunt of the pandemic in the UK.

Wales tests about one in 150 compared to England, which screens about one in 200, Scotland, one in 175. Northern Ireland tests the highest number of people per capita – with about one in 140 people getting a levy.

Paul Hunter, professor of infectious diseases at the University of East Anglia, told MailOnline: “This may reflect different testing strategies in Wales … where the Welsh are really at higher risk of getting the infection.

“A possibility is certainly plausible, especially if the tests were not performed as often due to patient pressure in London, where the major risk was occurring, which would delete the figures for England as a whole.

“If the second possibility is correct, I can hardly explain why. Explanations could include things like the people who import the infection from England.

‘Or simply London (with an infection rate of 1.9 per 1000) – if many’ London Welsh ‘returned home at the start of the epidemic or if visitors looking for their last trip are went to Wales. Alternatively, people and families mix more in Wales after the epidemic.

Boris Johnson is “completely free” of coronavirus as he is seen walking with Carrie and Dilyn the dog in the garden Checkers – as No10 reveals that he has ALREADY been in contact with Dominic Raab but insists that does not “immediately return to work”

Boris Johnson tested negative for coronavirus before he was discharged from hospital, Downing Street confirmed yesterday as the Prime Minister begins his healing journey in his Checkers area.

Number 10 said the Prime Minister spoke to Dominic Raab “over the weekend,” the first secretary of state continuing to replace Johnson.

The Prime Minister’s official spokesperson said over lunch that Johnson “would not immediately return to work” and that he would be “guided by the advice of his doctors.”

Mr. Johnson was spotted walking in Ladies Park yesterday with his partner Carrie Symonds and his dog Dilyn.

The Cabinet is divided on when the Prime Minister should return to work as he is under strict medical orders to rest in his grace and foster his home in Buckinghamshire.

Some senior ministers have reportedly already pressed for him to be involved in the decision – due Thursday – on the extension of the British foreclosure.

An extension of the restrictions on social separation is considered a formality, but the duration is still to be discussed with some inflexible, it must be Mr. Johnson’s decision.

However, medical experts have warned that the PM must not return to work too soon or he could risk a relapse.

Some MPs expressed concern about asking someone who had just left intensive care to make important decisions, insisting that he should “shoot all cylinders” when he returned.

PM status updates came amid warnings that UK GDP could collapse up to 30% in the current quarter, which could cost millions of jobs, due to the disruption of coronaviruses.

The decision to lift or not the lockout restrictions in Britain is likely to draw heavily on the situation in Italy and Spain, which appear to have passed the peaks of their epidemics and are temporarily beginning to ease their closings.

Boris Johnson, pictured delivering his Easter message Sunday after discharge from hospital, is now recovering in his Checkers area

Boris Johnson, photographié livrant son message de Pâques dimanche après sa sortie de l’hôpital, se remet maintenant dans son domaine de Checkers

M. Johnson est sous les ordres stricts des médecins de se reposer à la grâce du PM et de favoriser la maison de Buckinghamshire

M. Johnson est sous les ordres stricts des médecins de se reposer à la grâce du PM et de favoriser la maison de Buckinghamshire

Le long chemin de Boris vers le rétablissement? Une nouvelle étude montre que 70% des patients en soins intensifs souffrent de problèmes de santé à long terme

La plupart des patients admis aux soins intensifs souffrent de problèmes de santé physique et mentale à long terme, selon des scientifiques dans une nouvelle étude, alors que Boris Johnson entame son long chemin vers la guérison d’un coronavirus.

Une étude norvégienne a révélé que sept survivants en soins intensifs sur dix se retrouvent avec un syndrome de soins intensifs post-intensifs, qui peut comprendre de la fatigue, de la fragilité, de l’anxiété ou des difficultés à tenir une conversation.

Les chercheurs ont déclaré que leurs résultats pourraient s’appliquer aux patients COVID-19 gravement malades. Le père de M. Johnson, Stanley, a révélé que son fils était si gravement malade à un moment donné qu’il «  en a presque pris un pour l’équipe  » – malgré Downing Street a refusé de dire à quel point le Premier ministre était gravement malade pendant ses soins intensifs.

Mais cela survient au milieu des craintes que le Premier ministre se prépare à se précipiter pour retourner au travail avant qu’il ne soit en pleine forme – et comme un député conservateur senior a remis en question la sagesse de l’impliquer dans les décisions clés si peu de temps après sa bataille en soins intensifs.

D’autres personnes souffrant de coronavirus au Royaume-Uni ont également révélé comment la maladie invalidante les a laissées faibles, essoufflées et toussant même longtemps après leur rétablissement officiel. To overcome the virus, it is not enough to wait for the infection to cure, and people who are coming out of their trials say that it left them totally beaten.

Le Premier ministre a été transféré d’une unité de soins intensifs dans un service jeudi soir la semaine dernière.

Il a ensuite passé deux jours et demi de plus à l’hôpital St Thomas dans le centre de Londres avant d’être autorisé à partir dimanche.

Downing Street confirmed that he had tested negative before his release and went to his Checkers campaign area to continue his recovery.

The World Health Organization reports that a coronavirus patient can be released after two negative results taken 24 hours apart.

Scientists say patients can recover as soon as their antibodies begin to successfully fight the life-threatening infection, regardless of their illness.

Antibodies are substances produced by the immune system in response to an infection and eventually destroy an invasive pathogen.

How people recover from COVID-19 – a coronavirus that is closely related to the SARS bug – is not yet fully understood.

With many viral diseases, such as measles, the body develops immunity after being infected once, and this can last a lifetime.

Immunity means that the body remembers fighting a virus so well that it can destroy it before symptoms start if someone catches the virus.

Scientists are still not sure whether people will develop full immunity to SARS-Cov-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, after they have it.

But the overwhelming belief is that people won’t catch it twice, which gives hope of using antibody tests to determine who is immune.

The fact that so few people seem to get sick a second time seems to prove that people only get sick once. Tests on monkeys also supported the theory.

Fears have been expressed that people may be hit twice after reports of re-infection of patients in China, South Korea and Japan.

Some experts believe this is due to unreliable tests, while others claim that similar coronaviruses induce immunity for about three months.

Le Groupe consultatif scientifique du gouvernement pour les urgences (SAGE) évaluera les données relatives au verrouillage et à la propagation de la maladie dans les prochains jours.

Une décision sur l’extension des restrictions du Royaume-Uni devrait alors être prise jeudi cette semaine – probablement lors d’une réunion de la COBRA – les mesures actuelles étant maintenant en place depuis près de trois semaines.

Le verrouillage a entravé l’économie britannique et c’est pourquoi certains ministres pensent que ce doit être M. Johnson qui approuve ce qui se passera ensuite en participant aux discussions plus tard cette semaine.

Une source du Cabinet a déclaré au Telegraph: «Le Premier ministre doit prendre cette décision.

« Tout verrouillage aura des implications énormes, et le Premier ministre en sera responsable, donc c’est lui qui doit prendre cette décision. “

Cependant, tout le monde au Cabinet n’est pas d’accord.

Certains ministres estiment que le premier secrétaire d’État Dominic Raab, qui remplace M. Johnson, peut prendre la décision sans impliquer le Premier ministre.

Une source a déclaré: « Je ne pense pas que le Cabinet veuille retirer le Premier ministre de son rétablissement et risquer de l’empirer ».

Downing Street a déclaré hier que M. Johnson se concentrait sur son rétablissement, car le porte-parole du Premier ministre a également confirmé que le Premier ministre avait testé négatif pour la maladie mortelle avant sa sortie de l’hôpital.

Le numéro 10 a décrit la pittoresque retraite de campagne des Dames comme «un endroit approprié pour que le Premier ministre poursuive sa récupération».

M. Johnson ne reçoit pas actuellement sa boîte rouge ministérielle quotidienne contenant des documents d’information des autorités alors que M. Raab continue de diriger le pays.

Une nouvelle étude a montré que la majorité des patients admis aux soins intensifs souffrent de problèmes de santé physique et mentale à long terme.

La recherche a révélé que sept survivants en soins intensifs sur dix se retrouvent avec un syndrome de soins intensifs qui peut inclure de la fatigue, de la fragilité, de l’anxiété ou des difficultés à tenir une conversation.

The results, based on 1,300 people, are the first in a five-year ongoing study in hospitals in the Netherlands.

Les scientifiques pensent que les résultats sont susceptibles de s’appliquer aux patients atteints de coronavirus gravement malades.

Un député conservateur de haut rang a remis en question la sagesse du Premier ministre potentiellement impliqué dans de grandes décisions si peu de temps après sa bataille en soins intensifs.

Le député a déclaré à MailOnline: «Il y a une inquiétude à ce sujet et je pense qu’il doit écouter les conseils médicaux.

«Mais sous réserve qu’il écoute ces conseils médicaux, je suis presque sûr qu’il voudra être celui qui prendra cette décision.

«Chaque rapport que j’ai lu de survivants indique que cela les frappe énormément, alors il doit surveiller sa propre santé.»

Le député a ajouté: «Indépendamment de ce que les médecins disent, il voudra probablement être impliqué dans cette décision et donner son aval.

«Je pense qu’il comprend que l’argent s’arrête avec lui.

The World Health Organization reports that a coronavirus patient can be released after two negative results taken 24 hours apart.

Scientists say patients can recover as soon as their antibodies begin to successfully fight the life-threatening infection, regardless of their illness.

Antibodies are substances produced by the immune system in response to an infection and eventually destroy an invasive pathogen.

Certains ministres pensent que Dominic Raab, photographié hier à Whitehall, peut prendre la décision de prolonger le verrouillage et que M. Johnson devrait se concentrer sur le repos

Certains ministres pensent que Dominic Raab, photographié hier à Whitehall, peut prendre la décision de prolonger le verrouillage et que M. Johnson devrait se concentrer sur le repos

Les survivants révèlent comment la maladie invalidante les a laissés essoufflés et faibles pendant des semaines après leur rétablissement

People with coronavirus in the UK have revealed how the debilitating disease left them weak, breathless and coughing even after they recovered.

More than 84,000 people have been officially diagnosed with the infection since the start of the epidemic in Britain in February – 10,612 have died, but many have recovered.

To overcome the virus, it is not enough to wait for the infection to cure, and people who are coming out of their trials say that it left them totally beaten.

Dani Schuchman, a 40-year-old cyclist, said he had run out of power on his bike and could only walk 2.5 miles at a time.

Elementary school teacher Brian Mephin said in a breathtaking video that he was “wiped out” and even had trouble climbing stairs after he was released from the hospital.

And a man from Manchester known only by the name of Andrew admitted that he had been “breathless” after recovering from the disease.

Curing the virus also has a psychological impact on those who fall seriously ill. Karen Mannering, une mère de trois enfants, a déclaré que son hospitalisation au COVID-19 était «ses heures les plus sombres».

Pendant ce temps, le député conservateur Alec Shelbrooke a déclaré à MailOnline que ceux qui exigeaient que M. Johnson établisse un calendrier pour revenir devaient «  grandir  » car il a déclaré que le PM devait «  tirer sur tous les cylindres  » avant de revenir à temps plein.

« Je crains juste que le Premier ministre prenne le temps dont il a besoin pour récupérer », a-t-il déclaré.

«En fin de compte, nous savons maintenant qu’il est très, très gravement malade. Il a dit lui-même que cela aurait pu aller dans un sens ou dans l’autre.

«Il n’a pas besoin de se précipiter. He has all the support of the country behind him. Les gens reconnaissent à quel point c’était sérieux, à quel point il travaillait dur.

Le vice-président du Parti conservateur a ajouté que M. Johnson devrait se détendre pendant « au moins quelques semaines ».

« Je pense que les politiciens qui disent » ce qui se passe « – poussant presque la pression pour qu’il revienne – doivent grandir un peu parce que le public veut qu’il se rétablisse complètement », a ajouté M. Shelbrooke.

“I don’t want to see him rush into things. Je veux m’assurer qu’il va bien.

La pression monte sur le gouvernement pour lever au moins certaines des restrictions de distanciation sociale après qu’il a été annoncé que M. Sunak estime que le verrouillage aura un impact massif sur l’économie.

PPE deliveries from China “defective and improperly labeled”

Fournir des équipements de protection vitaux au personnel de santé de première ligne est devenu «  au jour le jour  », a révélé un leader du NHS.

The government flies boxes from China daily by air, but some are removed from the planes before take-off by officials who wish to test them. Other boxes arrive in the UK only for NHS officials to find out that they have been mis-labeled.

Rather than containing essential protective gowns, they are filled with masks. Worse still, much of the kit from China – the world’s largest supplier – is unusable as it fails British security checks.

The amazing revelations come from Chris Hopson of NHS Providers, who represents hospitals, ambulance services and mental health trusts. He said, “It was all a little bit day to day.

“The crux of the matter is that obtaining this stock, which was ordered from China weeks ago, is somewhat erratic. » Il a déclaré que la Chine était le seul pays à avoir accès aux bons matériaux et à la capacité de production pour produire des équipements de protection.

More than 30 NHS staff are believed to have died from coronavirus, and activists say some of the deaths are a direct result of a lack of personal protective equipment, or PPE.

Last week, the National Institute for Economic and Social Research (NIESR) think tank suggested that 25% of the UK economy could be lost by summer due to current controls.

The Times reported that Sunak told colleagues that the consequences could be even worse with a third-quarter drop in GDP in the second quarter.

Les experts ont déclaré qu’il est impossible de prédire avec un certain degré de certitude la rapidité avec laquelle le PM pourrait se rétablir complètement.

Duncan Young, professeur de médecine de soins intensifs à l’Université d’Oxford, a déclaré au Times: « Personne ne sait combien de temps il faut pour se remettre complètement des infections à Covid-19, car il n’a pas encore été étudié. “

Pendant ce temps, Julian Tang, professeur agrégé honoraire au Département des sciences respiratoires de l’Université de Leicester, a déclaré que la vitesse de guérison de M. Johnson serait largement dictée par son état de santé général.

The PM was effectively ‘stepped down’ from ICU and then allowed to go to Chequers but there are fears a lack of rest could result in him having to be ‘stepped up’ again.

Dr Tang said: ‘There have been patients who later had to be stepped back up to intensive care again.’

Mr Johnson said in a video statement released after he left hospital on Sunday the NHS ‘has saved my life, no question’.

The PM said he believed ‘things could have gone either way’ for him as he praised the nurses and doctors who treated him.

‘We will win because our NHS is the beating heart of this country,’ he said of the nation’s ongoing coronavirus battle.

“It is the best in this country. It’s invincible. It is fueled by love. ‘

Europe goes back to work: millions of Spaniards are allowed to return to work after the lifting of industrial locks

Europe is beginning its return to work yesterday as factories and construction sites re-open in Spain while Italy takes its first steps towards easing the lockdown.

Police were handing out masks on Spanish metro trains yesterday as some ‘non-essential’ workers were allowed to resume their activities after a two-week ban.

Italy will allow bookstores, stationery stores and stores selling children’s clothing to reopen tomorrow with the first easing of Europe’s longest lock, although most restrictions have been extended until May.

Meanwhile, in Denmark, schools and daycare centers will reopen on Wednesday, allowing some parents to return to work.

Passengers keep their distance riding the metro in Madrid as non-essential workers are allowed back to work yesterday

Passengers keep their distance riding the metro in Madrid as non-essential workers are allowed back to work yesterday

Spain is lifting its ban on non-essential activities despite concerns from some regional leaders and unions.

The ban was stricter than in Britain, where people can still go to work if they cannot work from home during the lockout.

The people returning yesterday include sanitary, security and telecommunications workers, customs officials and those involved in gas and electricity supplies.

They and their businesses will have to comply with strict regulations to ensure that they are not infected with the virus.

Non-essential workers were sent home on March 30, but the Spanish government did not extend the measure despite an upsurge in new deaths yesterday.

An additional 619 deaths were announced on Sunday, 109 more than on Saturday, ending three days of declining deaths.

It brought the number of coronavirus deaths in the country to 16,972, the third highest in the world after the United States and Italy.

ANDREW PIERCE: Cabinet hawks and doves are split on the UK’s plan for how and when to lift the lockdown

As countries across Europe start to ease themselves out of lockdown, there is a growing recognition in Boris Johnson’s Cabinet that it, too, will have to make some hard decisions in the coming days.

Of course, in terms of infection rates, Britain remains some weeks behind European countries such as Italy and Spain.

But even so, two camps are starting to emerge among the Prime Minister’s colleagues and advisers: the hawks and the doves.

Now that Boris has left hospital, the disagreement between the two factions is starting to heat up

Now that Boris has left hospital, the disagreement between the two factions is starting to heat up

The hawks, spurred on by Chancellor Rishi Sunak, see a return to normality as an urgent necessity to avoid permanent economic damage to Britain

The hawks, spurred on by Chancellor Rishi Sunak, see a return to normality as an urgent necessity to avoid permanent economic damage to Britain

The hawks, spurred on by Chancellor Rishi Sunak, see a return to normality as an urgent necessity to avoid permanent economic damage to Britain.

Meanwhile, doves such as Health Secretary Matt Hancock fear a return of the pandemic and insist that social distancing rules must remain in force long after the infection curve flattens.

Now that Boris has left hospital, the disagreement between the two factions is starting to heat up.

For while they are all concerned that he obeys doctors’ orders and rests up, they are equally interested to know whether Boris, after experiencing the viciousness of coronavirus first-hand, is as committed as he was before to relaxing the unprecedented lockdown.

To discern which side Boris is leaning towards, we need only look at two of the first calls he made after leaving intensive care.

They were to Dominic Raab, the Foreign Secretary who has been deputising for him, and Mr Hancock – both leading doves in the Cabinet.

At yesterday’s Downing Street press conference, Mr Raab made it clear which side of the debate he stands on

At yesterday’s Downing Street press conference, Mr Raab made it clear which side of the debate he stands on

Meanwhile, doves such as Health Secretary Matt Hancock fear a return of the pandemic and insist that social distancing rules must remain in force long after the infection curve flattens

Meanwhile, doves such as Health Secretary Matt Hancock fear a return of the pandemic and insist that social distancing rules must remain in force long after the infection curve flattens

Indeed, at yesterday’s Downing Street press conference, Mr Raab made it clear which side of the debate he stands on.

He said: ‘We have to keep social distancing in place. There will come a time in the future when we can talk about relaxation or transition but we are not there now.’

One senior Whitehall source sympathetic to the doves explained: ‘Our entire strategy is to prevent the NHS being overwhelmed, to ensure patients aren’t dying on trolleys in hospital corridors or at home alone because of a shortage of NHS beds.

‘We can’t risk all that by ending the lockdown, which has broad public support.’

Asked about the Prime Minister’s view, the source added: ‘I think it’s fair to speculate when you have your life saved by the NHS that he may now be completely signed up to that view. The hawk has become a dove.’

If true, it would be a monumental U-turn for the Prime Minister, a lifelong libertarian who was once one of the most hawkish Cabinet members, along with Mr Sunak, Gavin Williamson, the Education Secretary, and Home Secretary Priti Patel.

It would be a monumental U-turn for the Prime Minister, a lifelong libertarian who was once one of the most hawkish Cabinet members, along with Mr Sunak, Gavin Williamson, the Education Secretary, and Home Secretary Priti Patel

It would be a monumental U-turn for the Prime Minister, a lifelong libertarian who was once one of the most hawkish Cabinet members, along with Mr Sunak, Gavin Williamson, the Education Secretary, and Home Secretary Priti Patel

Michael Gove, who like Mr Raab fought Boris for the leadership last year, is also remaining loyal. ‘He’s not a hawk or a dove, he’s with the PM,’ a source claimed

Michael Gove, who like Mr Raab fought Boris for the leadership last year, is also remaining loyal. ‘He’s not a hawk or a dove, he’s with the PM,’ a source claimed

As one ministerial source put it: ‘Boris wasn’t so much a hawk about lifting the lockdown, he was the Cabinet’s golden eagle.’

This may explain why it’s rumoured that Boris has had no personal contact with the hawkish Mr Sunak.

Describing the Chancellor’s outlook, one source said: ‘Not only will it be economic Armageddon, Sunak fears a terrible impact on mental health and families when unemployment soars and businesses start folding.’

But for all their differences, there is some agreement among the hawks and doves – that schools should reopen by the summer half term.

One senior minister said: ‘I think we are at one on this. If it is possible we will start getting schools open, but it depends on the medical evidence.’

Whatever the truth, as Boris convalesces at Chequers, his country residence, he knows that Mr Raab is quietly enforcing his wishes.

Michael Gove, who like Mr Raab fought Boris for the leadership last year, is also remaining loyal. ‘He’s not a hawk or a dove, he’s with the PM,’ a source claimed.

And so for the next three weeks at least, the doves in the Cabinet will be confident they can hold sway.

But one well-placed source says: ‘Boris will make the final decision. ‘Two weeks ago Boris the hawk would have decided. Now I’m not so sure.’

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