Do you remember when the women of Twin Peaks once again nostalgized?

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Written by Ananda Pellerin, CNN

Before Netflix, before sagas like “Game of Thrones” – before broadband Internet – there was “Twin Peaks”. It is no exaggeration to say that without “Twin Peaks” there would be no “Buffy the Vampire Slayer”, no “Riverdale” and, presumably, no “Gilmore Girls”. Defining the model for edgy television drama, David Lynch’s avant-garde police procedure, which was first broadcast 30 years ago on April 8, 1990, brought the Gothic Americana into the mainstream.

In equal parts “Twilight Zone” and “Dynasty”, “Twin Peaks” was a departure from the conventional intrigue of popular prime-time dramas like “L.A. Law” and “MacGyver”. His legacy transcends his short term (two seasons, until a third is released in 2017) and cult status, slipping on the covers of Time and Rolling Stone, and in cooler conversations around the world .

Catherine E Coulson as

Catherine E Coulson as the “Log Lady” Credit: ABC Photo Archive / Walt Disney Television / Getty Images

But it’s not just the unsolved mystery of the return queen’s death, Laura Palmer, that drove viewers to return to the haunted – and haunted – city on the west coast, brimming with daggers, d sexual escapades and a legendary “darkness” that hides in the woods. Shot on film, the show had a cinematic feel that was unusual for television at the time, with Lynch’s signature psychosexual surrealism (seen in previous independent releases like “Blue Velvet” and “Eraserhead”) increasing everyone’s tension visually and emotionally saturated scene.

Kyle MacLachlan as FBI special agent Dale Cooper and Michael Ontkean as local sheriff Harry S Truman

Kyle MacLachlan as FBI special agent Dale Cooper and Michael Ontkean as local sheriff Harry S Truman Credit: ABC Photo Archive / Walt Disney Television / Getty Images

This tone owes a huge debt to the costumes in the series, directed by Lynch’s longtime collaborator, Patricia Norris. Simple staples from past decades have been updated and worn with modern ease, while the trends that would define the next decade could be seen in their infancy, making “Twin Peaks” a timeless vintage piece.

There was no shortage of convincing characters with distinct looks. From coffee-obsessed FBI special agent Dale Cooper (Kyle MacLachlan) in his beige trench coat and shiny cream officer’s haircut, to Hawaiian psychiatrist in shirt Dr Jacoby (Russ Tamblyn), to the showy lady newspaper (Catherine E Coulson) in her red rimmed glasses.

Audrey (Sherilyn Fenn) performs her infamous solo dance at the Double R diner

Audrey (Sherilyn Fenn) performs her infamous solo dance at the Double R diner Credit: From YouTube

The women in particular embodied the twin spirits of repression and desire of the city, and nothing more than the agitated teenager Audrey Horne (Sherilyn Fenn). Daughter of the intriguing businessman Benjamin Horne, Audrey is bored, imaginative and does not care what anyone thinks. When we find her for the first time sulking around her father’s wood-paneled Great Northern Hotel, impatiently terrifying a group of Norwegian businessmen with her morbid tale of the city’s recent murder, she embodies the little girl of the 1950s in a saddle and a pink angora sweater, tucked into a plaid skirt.

Audrey Horne (Sherilynn Fenn) smoking in the school toilet

Audrey Horne (Sherilynn Fenn) smoking in the school toilet Credit: From YouTube

Audrey Horne (Sherilyn Fenn) at the brothel One-Eyed Jacks

Audrey Horne (Sherilyn Fenn) at the brothel One-Eyed Jacks Credit: From YouTube

It’s not surprising, then, when we later see Audrey trading her flats for red kitten heels tucked away in her school locker, or smoking cool in the girls’ bathroom, with her A-shaped eyebrows and his tight-fitting sweater, defining the kind of scene that pushed lobbyists to pressure Hollywood to stop letting the actors smoke on the screen – because it looked too good. Or, in a moment that marked television history, Audrey, poured into a slender little black dress, twisted a cherry stalk into a knot with her tongue.

Veronica on “Riverdale” is an obvious heir to Audrey’s vampire teenage character, but the same goes for Courtney Love of the 90s, with her decomposed pinup look; the independent and lively Rory and Lorelai of “Gilmore Girls”, with jeans and MAC lipstick; and Santana, the alluring and alluring cheerleader from “Glee”.

Lara Flynn Boyle plays Donna Hayward crying at her desk

Lara Flynn Boyle plays Donna Hayward crying at her desk Credit: CBS / Getty Images Photo Archive

At the other end of the mid-century spectrum is Donna, the kind hearted girl of the city doctor, cut from the best girl fabric next door. Even as she burst into tears in the middle of the class, suddenly aware that something terrible had happened to her best friend Laura, it was hard not to be distracted by her impeccably groomed nails.

But Lynch’s nostalgia did not end with the 1950s. Norma, owner of the Double R restaurant (played by Peggy Lipton of the fame of “Bewitched” and “The Mod Squad”) updates the look of the class. worker on “Alice”, which lasted from 1974 to 1985, bringing the elegance of a ball gown to her blue and white uniform, with an integrated apron and sheepskin sleeves.

Peggy Lipton as Norma Jennings, owner of Double R restaurant

Peggy Lipton as Norma Jennings, owner of Double R restaurant Credit: ABC Photo Archive / Walt Disney Television / Getty Images

Likewise, Josie Packard (Joan Chen), the phenomenally chic widow of the city’s former factory owner, exudes pure glamor. With immaculate lips and jet black hair, she bridges the gap between the power combinations of the 1980s and the more relaxed couture that would take root in the 90s, Josie always looks directly on the runway, she wears a silk green bathrobe, red sweater dress or high waist plaid pants combined with a structural brown cardigan (probably the best outfit in the series).

Joan Chen as Josie Packard, widow and heiress of the Twin Peaks sawmill

Joan Chen as Josie Packard, widow and heiress of the Twin Peaks sawmill Credit: ABC Photo Archive / Walt Disney Television / Getty Images

There were only eight episodes in the first season of Twin Peaks, but that was enough to kick off the 1990s on an elegant and precious note. Wool sweaters, wool cardigans, wool tights, A-line skirts and plaid, plaid, plaid would soon be reflected in Seattle grunge and cuteness “Clueless”, while the lack of fashion accessories and short hair for women would be part of the decade’s minimalist style code.

David Duchovny as DEA agent Denise Bryson

David Duchovny as DEA Officer Denise Bryson Credit: From YouTube

And while season two was full of its own pleasant surprises – DEA agent and trans woman Denise Bryson, played by David Duchovny, arrives in town – and the reboot gave fans a long-awaited quirk of quirk in a small town, 30 years later, remains something special about these first eight episodes, a magical quality that has not yet been reproduced.

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