Coronavirus UK: images show how the NHS is coping with a pandemic

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Camera access for the first time to NHS intensive care units has exposed the growing pressure on doctors treating coronavirus patients.

A glimpse inside the Royal Bournemouth Hospital (RBH) shows the lives of frontline health workers, whom they described as emotionally draining and “scary”.

Tonight’s BBC and ITV reports of the so-called “red zone” – where the sickest patients are treated – included disastrous warnings from doctors concerned about the depletion of oxygen supplies while the NHS squeaks under the pressure of new infections.

Cases and deaths continue to climb, and the UK has unfortunately announced today an additional 439 deaths, bringing the total to 5,373, while the number of patients has increased from 3,802 to 51,608.

In a glimmer of hope after a grim week for Britain, the number of people dying from COVID-19 has now dropped for two consecutive days and has dropped 30% from 621 yesterday.

Foreign Minister Dominic Raab, who replaces the Prime Minister with the virus, confirmed the figures at a press conference in Downing Street this afternoon.

Boris Johnson faces another night at St Thomas Hospital after being admitted to tests last night as a precaution, but Number 10 insists he’s still leading the government’s response against coronaviruses.

Another tough day in the UK war against the coronavirus:

  • Humiliated, Nicola Sturgeon admitted that the coronavirus effort had been damaged after she was forced to accept the resignation of the chief medical officer of Scotland for flouting her own lock rules;
  • Chief Medical Officer of Health Chris Whitty came out of self-isolation and worked after recovering from a coronavirus;
  • Worrying figures show that the coronavirus epidemic in the United Kingdom is expected to exceed that of France and Italy;
  • Health Secretary Matt Hancock threatened to revoke the right to exercise outdoors if people continued to flout social distancing measures;
  • The Prime Minister’s spokesperson confirmed that sunbathing in public is not allowed and flouts the rules allowing only essential movements;
  • Top scientists have said it would take at least a month in the UK to develop antibody tests that could be widely deployed to find out who has had the virus before;
  • A report from the National Center for Critical Care Research and Audit found that ethnic minorities are at greater risk of becoming seriously ill with coronavirus.
A glimpse inside the Royal Bournemouth Hospital (RBH) shows the daily routine of frontline health workers, whom they described as emotionally draining and potentially perilous

A glimpse inside the Royal Bournemouth Hospital (RBH) shows the daily routine of frontline health workers, which they described as emotionally draining and potentially perilous

Linda New, a coronavirus patient, who was released today after a stay in intensive care, said:

Linda New, a coronavirus patient, who was released today after a stay in intensive care, said, “Never in a million years,” she thought the effects of the disease would be so debilitating.

A nurse working in RBH, where two people died overnight, said she was concerned for her own well-being after the deaths of several NHS health workers.

Ami Curtis, a staff nurse at RBH, told ITV News: “I have asthma, but we have a duty to our patients. It’s scary, and I would be lying if I said that I’m not afraid.

She said she even suffered from eczema on her hands after washing them so often.

Tonight’s exclusive report also revealed that “every death wreaks havoc” on NHS workers, and spoke to night manager Ella Gordula, who has become moved when discussing two deaths in the past 24 hours.

The images show a very busy room, filled with doctors all wearing personal protective equipment.

Everyone should wear masks and gowns because every new patient with symptoms is assumed to have the virus, even if they have not been tested.

Doctors also feared a shortage of oxygen, which is rapidly decreasing amid the peaks of Covid-19 admission.

Michelle Scott, a critical consultant in the so-called “red zone,” said that under normal circumstances, such vital supplies would never be threatened, but the NHS is cracking under the pressure of the crisis.

A coronavirus patient, who came out today after a stay in intensive care, said that “never in a million years,” she thought the effects of the disease would be so debilitating.

Linda New, a hos was applauded by the staff as she left the hospital, said, “I just wanted to get through for my kids. Without this lot, I would never have done it. They are so good.

Another patient, Alan Hunt, 62, who has been in the intensive care unit (ICU) for the past eight days, highlighted the exhausting effects of the disease.

A nurse working in the so-called `` red zone '' (ICU entrance on the photo), where two people died overnight, said she was concerned for her own well-being after several NHS health workers died with infection

A nurse working in the so-called “red zone” (ICU entrance on the photo), where two people died overnight, said she was concerned for her own well-being after several officers health workers died with infection

Images show an intensely occupied room, filled with doctors all wearing personal protective equipment

Images show an intensely occupied room, filled with doctors all wearing personal protective equipment

Everyone should wear masks and gowns because every new patient with symptoms is assumed to have the virus, even if it has not been tested.

Everyone should wear masks and gowns because every new patient with symptoms is assumed to have the virus, even if they have not been tested.

He said: It’s so easy to catch and you can’t get rid of it once you get it. It infected my two lungs, I’m in repair but I’m still out of breath doing anything.

The government is urgently trying to increase the capacity of the country’s intensive care units as the United Kingdom approaches the peak of its epidemic.

Surgeon General Professor Chris Whitty said today that it is “essential” that the NHS always has an excess of critical beds available during the fight against coronavirus.

He said at tonight’s Downing Street press conference: “Our main goal … is to ensure that the gap between the number of beds available for intensive care and those needed is always in a situation where we have room.

“And if we find ourselves in a situation where we have more intensive care beds at any time during this epidemic than we absolutely need to deal with Covid and other regions, it will be a success.”

“This is something that is essential to our overall goal. What we would like to see is a margin of safety between what we need and what we have at any given time, both for Covid and other conditions.

Raab said the construction of additional NHS Nightingale hospitals in areas such as Bristol, Harrogate and Birmingham was aimed at ensuring the spread of intensive care beds across England.

Countries across Europe, including the UK, Italy and Spain, have seen the number of people who have died from coronaviruses fall in recent days, raising hopes that their outbreaks may slow

Countries across Europe, including the United Kingdom, Italy and Spain, have seen the number of people who have died from coronaviruses fall in recent days, raising hopes that their outbreaks may slow

He added, “We are not complacent from a distance. We are doing everything we can to make sure that we not only have the capacity but also the flexibility.

The number of deaths today is the lowest since March 31, Tuesday, when it was 381, and marks a decrease of 39% from the worst day in the UK so far, Saturday, when the deaths of 708 people were recorded.

The number of new cases is also lower than it was for most of the past week, with the 3,802 new positive tests 2,101 less than 5,903 yesterday and only the second time since March that the number is less than 4,000 .

Housing secretary Robert Jenrick said authorities will begin to consider easing the UK lockdown in the coming weeks if the number of people admitted to hospital remains stable. There are fears that a long quarantine could cause permanent damage to the economy and the NHS seems to be doing well so far.

However, for normalcy to return, experts say antibody tests – which reveal who has already recovered from COVID-19 – will be necessary. But prominent scientists warned that the UK was at least a month away from having all of this work, adding that all of the kits that had already been checked “did not work well” and were not worth the trouble. used.

More optimistic statistics come in as European countries, including Italy, Spain and Germany, appear to be seeing death rates decline – Germany’s epidemic appears to have peaked with only 1600 deaths .

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