Coronavirus UK: Cabinet Minister Robert Jenrick Defies Lockout

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Cabinet minister accused of twice breaking his own lock rules, including storing food and medicine in his parents’ rural house, is under pressure today after the couple’s neighbors said that they were already delivering essential items.

Robert Jenrick, a key player in the government response to the pandemic that claimed the lives of 7,978 people in Britain, has repeatedly asked the public to stay at home and not make unnecessary trips to stop the spread coronavirus.

But today it has emerged that he stayed at his 2.5 million pound house in London for the first six days of the closure until March 29 – the day he replaced Boris Johnson at the daily press conference on Downing Street coronavirus and again urged the British not to leave the house.

A few hours later, he then traveled 150 miles to his country home in Herefordshire, where his wife Michal, a London-based lawyer, and three children live. He then drove to visit his parents in Shropshire with supplies last weekend, although he urged the others to stay home for “all the most essential activities.”

The minister tweeted a defense and said, “For clarity – my parents asked me to provide some essentials – including medication. They both self-isolate due to my father’s age and health and I followed the rules of social distancing. ” But the couple’s neighbors told the Guardian that they had already dropped off supplies with Mr. Jenrick’s parents during the lockout. This was not denied, although a source close to Mr. Jenrick said that he was also asked to collect and dispense medication.

Jenrick, who owns a third taxpayer-funded home of £ 2,000 a month in his riding of Newark, said last night that he considered the Herefordshire property to be the family home.

But his official conservative website does not mention his grade I country home, which says, “Robert is married to Michal, and they have three young daughters together. They live in Southwell near Newark and in London ”. Under the locking rules, travel to second homes is prohibited.

Last night, a government source described his behavior as an idiot. However, another insider # 10 said he had given “a full account” of himself, adding, “We support him.”

Scotland’s chief medical officer Catherine Calderwood was forced to resign over the weekend after visiting her second home twice – while in Australia New South Wales Minister for the Arts Don Harwin, resigned after leaving his Sydney apartment to stay at his Central Coast vacation home and was caught by the police.

Cabinet Minister Robert Jenrick, photographed in Downing Street on March 29, has forbidden to drive 150 miles last weekend to visit his parents in Shropshire despite the locking of Covid-19 while delivering self-isolated mother and father with food and medicine

On April 1, Mr. Jenrick Appeared Live on Television From His Herefordshire Home

Cabinet Minister Robert Jenrick, photographed in Downing Street on March 29, has forbidden to drive 150 miles last weekend to visit his parents in Shropshire despite the locking of Covid-19 while delivering self-isolated mother and father with food and medicine

Robert Jenrick's home in Herefordshire, which he says is his family's home despite owning property in London and his constituency for his work as an MP

Robert Jenrick’s home in Herefordshire, which he says is his family’s home despite owning property in London and his constituency for his work as an MP

His official conservative website does not mention his grade I country home, which says,

His official conservative website does not mention his grade I country home, which says, “Robert is married to Michal and together they have three young daughters. They live in Southwell near Newark and in London “

Jenrick, pictured with his wife Michal Berkner, has denied driving to his parents, saying he is giving up medication and food - both allowed under current guidelines

Jenrick, pictured with his wife Michal Berkner, has denied driving to his parents, saying he is giving up medication and food – both allowed under current guidelines

Mr. Jenrick transferred his family from London to their Grade I listed Herefordshire mansion before the lockdown. He then delivered food and medicine to his parents in Shropshire, 40 miles away.

Usually Mr. Jenrick and his family live at his home in central London, pictured

Usually Mr. Jenrick and his family live at his home in central London, pictured

Jenrick played a central role in the government’s “stay at home” campaign and told the British on Mother’s Day on March 21: “The choices we have to make in the coming days and weeks can save many lives. It means families are making big sacrifices, “adding,” We have to stay at home, protect the NHS and save lives. “

The community secretary moved to his Grade I listed Herefordshire mansion after the travel ban on second homes. He told the Mail that his wife and three young children consider the Herefordshire property to be the family home.

He owns a 2.5 million pound townhouse less than a mile from the Houses of Parliament and rents property in his Newark riding, for which he charges taxpayers £ 2,000 a month.

On March 23, new instructions were issued to warn people to stay in their primary residence and not to visit second homes “whether for solitary confinement or for vacation”.

He added, “People should stay in their primary residence. Failure to take these steps puts additional pressure on communities and services that are already at risk. “

Steve Reed MP, spokesperson for the New Labor Communities, said, “It is vitally important that ministers follow the rules they set for everyone. MPs must show everyone the importance of not traveling around the country, and if Robert Jenrick cannot provide a very good explanation of why these trips were necessary, then he must reflect on his position.

Dr. Paul Cosford, medical director of Public Health England, called on people to stay home over Easter because social distancing measures work – and admitted it was unclear whether Mr. Jenrick had violated his own rules.

He told Good Morning Britain: “People conform (to the measures) by an overwhelming majority and the impact that this has is that the transmission is much, much less than it would be otherwise. “

Dr. Cosford added, “The most important thing now is that we continue (staying at home) so that we can cross the summit and descend to the other side. “

After being asked about the community secretary, Robert Jenrick, who traveled 40 miles to deliver essentials and medicines to his parents, Dr. Cosford said it fell into a “gray area” because the directions were ” so complex. “

He added: “The principle is clear and it is to stay at home, unless you absolutely have to go out. “

Shadow House Secretary Nick Thomas-Symonds said it was up to Communities Secretary Robert Jenrick to explain why he had traveled 40 miles to visit his elderly parents.

Jenrick defended his actions by saying that he was delivering essentials, including medication, to his parents who are self-isolating.

Thomas-Symonds told BBC Breakfast, “There are four reasons for leaving your home. One of them is to provide essential supplies to vulnerable people.

“Clearly, if that’s what Robert Jenrick did, that fits the four exceptions. It is up to him to answer precisely what was the purpose of the journey he undertook.

As the number of coronavirus deaths in the UK reached 7,978, it became clear:

  • Carrie Symonds thanked NHS workers after Boris Johnson’s withdrawal from intensive care;
  • Priti Patel warned police against “heavy hands” after a police chief said that his forces could introduce roadblocks and search caddies;
  • Police chiefs have warned the public that “your time is up” because they have vowed that anyone caught on the way to an Easter getaway or a day trip will be refused;
  • A government science adviser said that the country “could not hide indefinitely” from the disease and predicted that 80% of people would get it;
  • Dominic Raab urged people to “stay home please” during the long Easter weekend amid fears that the sunny weather would encourage people to break the lock;
  • A government source said, “We did make the decision to extend the lockdown”;
  • Chief Scientific Advisor Sir Patrick Vallance said that almost a third of people around the world who had had a coronavirus may not have had any symptoms;
  • The decision to offer MPs an additional £ 10,000 for their offices during the pandemic was condemned as an “outrageous waste of public funds”;
  • The government extended its “overdraft” to the Bank of England to fund its spending campaign for coronaviruses;
  • Foreign Minister Raab has suggested that NHS workers may be on the line for a raise as the nation takes part in the clap for carers event;
  • Hopes have been raised for a mass testing program that could pave the way for foreclosure;
  • Universities have said they need a £ 2 billion bailout to avoid “financial failure” and collapse;
  • Scientists have said that the virus has mutated into three distinct types;
  • Matt Hancock launched a review of the health consequences of the lockdown after A&E audience dropped to its lowest level ever.

The besieged minister who violated travel restrictions against coronaviruses in Australia resigns

New South Wales Minister of Arts Don Harwin Fined $ 1,000

New South Wales Minister of Arts Don Harwin Fined $ 1,000

A minister who left his apartment in Sydney to stay in his vacation home during the coronavirus pandemic has resigned.

New South Wales Arts Minister Don Harwin was fined $ 1,000 after being found in his central coast vacation home and breaking restrictions on coronaviruses.

The coalition leader was spotted Wednesday afternoon at his million-dollar Pearl Beach home, more than an hour’s drive from his main home in east Sydney.

Harwin tendered his resignation to Prime Minister Gladys Berejiklian on Friday.

The Prime Minister said: “While Minister Harwin has served the people of New South Wales well and continues to assure me that he has not broken the rules, the orders in force are also apply to everyone. “

Harwin supported the state government while announcing his resignation on Friday.

“There is nothing more important than the work of the government in tackling the coronavirus crisis,” he said in a statement.

“I will not allow my situation to be a distraction from this work and I very much regret that my residential arrangements became a problem during this period. “

“At all times, I have sought to act in accordance with public health orders and have asked for advice so that my living conditions comply with these orders.”

Mr. Jenrick gave a press conference at Downing Street on March 29, during which he updated the nation on the latest virus advice, before traveling to his Herefordshire property, where he granted several media interviews via video link.

Mr. Jenrick insisted that Eye Manor in Herefordshire, built by an 18th century slave trader, is considered the family home, rather than their home in Westminster, although it should be there most of the week for his work.

And speaking to the Mail on Sunday 2014 before moving to their seat in Newark, he said the couple were “almost sure” that they would sell Eye Manor and move to their riding.

Explaining his decision last night, he told the Mail: “My home in Herefordshire is where my wife, children and I consider our family home and my family was there before any travel restrictions were announced.

“I worked in London on ministerial duties, set up the system to protect the group most vulnerable to coronaviruses and organized the response at the local level. Once I was able to work from home, it was normal for me to go home to do it and be with my wife and also help take care of my three young children. By staying at home, we protect the NHS and help save lives. I will stay in my family home until government advice changes or if I am needed in person in Westminster before the parliamentary session resumes after the Easter recess. “

Mr. Jenrick’s American wife, Michal Berkner, is a partner in the law firm City Cooley LLP.

Last night, the Guardian reported that a witness saw Mr. Jenrick in the front garden of his parents, who are 79 and 69, over the weekend. He is about an hour’s drive north of his Herefordshire home, which he bought in 2009. On the Friday before visiting his parents, he tweeted, “If you are planning to go out this weekend, don’t do it unless it’s for work (where you can’t work from home), health reasons, food purchases or exercise. We must stay at home to protect the NHS and save lives. “

In his letter on Sunday, Jenrick warned that the British must “make great sacrifices – especially today, on Mother’s Day”.

However, a few days before the lockdown was announced, Mr. Jenrick and his family moved into his Grade 1 listed mansion near the Parish Church of St Peter & St Paul in Eye, Herefordshire

However, a few days before the lockdown was announced, Mr. Jenrick and his family moved to his Grade 1 listed mansion near the Parish Church of St Peter & St Paul in Eye, Herefordshire

He added, “It is so important that we talk to our loved ones as much as possible – be it FaceTime or a phone call.

“But for now, we need to practice social distance in order to fight the spread of the virus. We must stay at home, protect the NHS and save lives. “

Raab admitted yesterday that the measures were “wreaking havoc”.

“There will be a lot of people who would normally plan a family reunion or just go out in the sun,” he added.

  • Latest news, views and expert advice on coronaviruses at mailplus.co.uk/ coronavirus

Boris Johnson LEAVES intensive care unit after three nights to continue recovery from coronavirus in hospital ward while Downing Street says he’s in a good mood

Boris Johnson was withdrawn from intensive care tonight, a sign that he is winning his battle against coronaviruses.

The Prime Minister, who has been hospitalized since Sunday, spent three nights in a heavy-duty unit at St Thomas Hospital in central London after his condition deteriorated.

The announcement came just hours after Foreign Minister Dominic Raab, who replaced him when he was incapacitated, said he was making “positive strides” in his treatment.

Tonight, a No. 10 spokesperson said, “The Prime Minister has been transferred from intensive care tonight to the ward, where he will be closely monitored during the first phase of his recovery.

“He is in a very good mood. “

The last time the Prime Minister was seen in person, not during a Zoom call, last week, he appeared at the door of No. 11 to applaud caregivers.

The last time the Prime Minister was seen in person, not in a Zoom call, last week, he appeared at the door of No. 11 to applaud caregivers.

Boris Johnson April 1

Boris Johnson April 1

The footage shows the Prime Minister’s changing appearance as his battle with the coronaviruses progresses. He is pictured on the left on March 17 and weeks later on April 1 after catching the virus.

Mr. Raab, the Minister of Foreign Affairs and First Secretary of State, started the daily press conference by saying:

Mr. Raab, the Minister of Foreign Affairs and First Secretary of State, started the daily press conference by saying: “He is still in intensive care but he continues to take positive steps and he is in a good mood”

Carrie Symonds posted a photo of a rainbow on Twitter tonight with cheering emoji while participating in the `` Clap for Carers '' campaign

Carrie Symonds posted a photo of a rainbow on Twitter tonight with cheering emoji while participating in the “Clap for Carers” campaign

Mr. Johnson was treated at St Thomas Hospital in London where many patients with Covid-19 are treated. Paramedics wearing face masks are seen above changing the sheets of the ambulance

Mr. Johnson was treated at St Thomas’ Hospital in London where many patients with Covid-19 are treated. Paramedics wearing face masks are seen above changing the sheets of the ambulance

Patel dismisses police calls for tougher restrictions

Priti Patel has turned down calls from chiefs of police for laws prohibiting the British from driving long distances and flouting the rule of exercising more than once a day.

Officers from Windermere, Cumbria, are already sending people into camper vans, while residents of St Ives, Cornwall, have blocked certain roads to protect vulnerable residents.

Police have also created online forms to alert people to potential March 23 lockout violations to fight the coronavirus pandemic.

At least five police chiefs would support tougher restrictions and clearer rules – including legislation to enforce the order to limit exercise to an hour outside after some people have flouted for sunbathing in parks or beaches.

Northamptonshire police said the “three-week grace period is over” and suggested that they might even start searching the shopping carts, but how it would work is unclear.

However, Patel said in a radio interview tonight that the government is “absolutely not” proposing to tighten up the lockdown measures.

Currently, the police can fine people or simply tell them to move. The Coronavirus Emergency Law gives ministers broad powers to impose restrictions on “events and rallies”, which, it appears, could be deployed to cover unnecessary travel.

According to the legislation, this can cover “any vehicle, train, boat or plane”, as well as “any tent or mobile structure”. The health secretary may issue a “directive” prohibiting events of a “specified description” to stop the transmission of the virus.

However, there are no provisions in the law that could require people to obtain prior authorization, present documents or have reasonable grounds to leave home.

Thoughts will now turn to how long Mr. Johnson could stay in the hospital before he is well enough to play a full role in government again.

The birth of her child with Carrie Symonds, 32, is also just a few weeks away, and the couple have been separated since their isolation on March 27.

Tonight, Miss Symonds went to Twitter where she posted a photo of a rainbow.

Along with the photo, she added cheering emojis as the nation took to the streets tonight for Clap for Carers.

One of the last times the Prime Minister was seen in person, and not in a zoom, was when he stood at the door of No. 11 last week to participate in Clap for Carers.

Another tumultuous day in the fight against the coronavirus:

  • Downing Street said that planning was underway in Whitehall for an exit strategy from the foreclosure, but ministers faced criticism for the secrecy over the plans;
  • Mr. Johnson “continues to improve” in intensive care, and he has been “hired” with the medical staff treating him at St Thomas Hospital;
  • A respected think tank warned that a million people could end up with long-term health problems due to the economic consequences of the coronavirus shutdown;
  • The Bank of England extended the government’s Ways and Means clause – in fact its overdraft;
  • New figures show that the economy had effectively stabilized before the coronavirus crisis reached 0.1% growth in the three months ending in February;
  • It appeared that MPs were offered £ 10,000 more to help them and the staff to work from home;
  • EU officials have accused the British government of being in “fantastic land” by insisting that the Brexit transition period cannot be extended beyond December;

It happened as the UK recorded 881 additional coronavirus deaths today, bringing Britain’s total to 7,978 as its coronavirus crisis continues.

Boris Johnson's condition is improving - and he may have even been able to speak to his pregnant fiancée Carrie Symonds (right), although Downing Street has not confirmed this.

Boris Johnson’s condition is improving – and he may have even been able to speak to his pregnant fiancée Carrie Symonds (right), although Downing Street has not confirmed this.

Boris Johnson is still in intensive care at St Thomas Hospital in central London today, although the Prime Minister's condition is expected to improve.

Boris Johnson is still in intensive care at St Thomas Hospital in central London today, although the Prime Minister’s condition is expected to improve.

Government extends “overdraft” with Bank of England

The government has widened its overdraft with the Bank of England to ensure it has enough cash to cope with disruption from coronaviruses.

He said the central bank will directly finance the additional spending the government needs on a temporary basis.

The Treasury and the Bank of England said in a joint statement that this would minimize the need to raise additional funds in the bond or currency markets.

The government’s central bank account, historically known as the Ways & Means Facility, will amount to an undisclosed amount.

Ministers will be able to spend more in the short term without having to tap into the bond markets because of this decision.

Mr. Raab, the Minister of Foreign Affairs and First Secretary of State, started the daily press conference tonight by saying, “May I start with an update on the Prime Minister – he is still in intensive care but he continues to take positive steps and is in good spirits. ‘

But he confirmed that he had not spoken to Mr. Johnson since taking office. When asked if they had been in touch, he replied, “Not yet. It is important, especially during intensive care, that he can focus on his recovery.

Raab chaired a meeting of Cobra’s emergency committee this afternoon, indicating that the foreclosure will continue for weeks on end despite mounting fears about the economic crisis.

The Minister of Foreign Affairs called on the public to continue to follow the rules of social distancing during his daily briefing on Downing Street, insisting that there will be no more information on the changes to the draconian restrictions until until at least the end of next week.

In a clear message, Mr. Raab – representative of Boris Johnson while he is being treated in intensive care – said that the disease should not “kill more people and hurt our country”. “We haven’t finished yet. We have to keep going, ”he said.

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Culture Secretary Oliver Dowden, an ally of the Prime Minister, said he

Le secrétaire à la Culture, Oliver Dowden, un allié du Premier ministre, a déclaré qu’il « s’améliorait » dans les soins intensifs, où il est soigné depuis lundi.

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