Coronavirus UK: 1 in 7 hospitalized patients die and half of intensive care units die

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More than one in seven people hospitalized with coronavirus in the UK will die, according to official statistics.

Britain has now recorded 10,612 deaths from COVID-19 in NHS hospitals out of a total of around 75,774 hospitalized patients, a death rate of 14%.

Intensive care unit (ICU) reports show that the death rate for critically ill patients, many of whom require ventilators, is considerably higher, at 51.6%.

Thousands of COVID-19 patients in UK hospitals end up in intensive care, and the most common deadly problem they face is pulmonary insufficiency in which the body cannot draw enough oxygen from the blood. .

Scientists also found shock and heart or kidney failure in a third of the cases.

Britain has now recorded 10,612 deaths from COVID-19 in NHS hospitals out of a total of around 75,774 hospitalized patients - a death rate of 14%

Britain has now recorded 10,612 deaths from COVID-19 in NHS hospitals out of a total of around 75,774 hospitalized patients – a death rate of 14%

Reports from the National Critical Care Research and Audit Center (ICNARC) show that patients with coronavirus admitted to intensive care have about a 50/50 chance of survival

Reports from the National Critical Care Research and Audit Center (ICNARC) show that patients with coronavirus admitted to intensive care have about a 50/50 chance of survival

New study shows 70% of intensive care patients suffer from long-term health problems as Boris Johnson begins the road to recovery

Boris Johnson, pictured delivering his Easter message yesterday after his discharge from hospital, is now recovering in his Checkers area

Boris Johnson, pictured delivering his Easter message yesterday after he was discharged from the hospital, is now recovering in his Checkers area

Most patients admitted to intensive care suffer from long-term physical and mental health problems, according to scientists in a new study, as Boris Johnson begins his recovery from the coronavirus.

Seven out of ten ICU survivors end up with ICU syndrome, which can include fatigue, frailty, anxiety, or difficulty keeping up a conversation.

The results, based on 1,300 people, are the first in a five-year ongoing study in hospitals in the Netherlands.

The researchers said their findings would likely apply to critically ill COVID-19 patients, who may spend weeks in hospital fighting the deadly infection.

The release comes after the Prime Minister was transferred from an intensive care unit to a ward on Thursday evening last week.

He then spent two and a half more days at St Thomas Hospital in central London before being allowed to leave yesterday.

Downing Street confirmed that he had tested negative before his release and went to his Checkers campaign area to continue his recovery.

The World Health Organization reports that a coronavirus patient can be released after two negative results taken 24 hours apart.

Scientists say patients can recover as soon as their antibodies begin to successfully fight the life-threatening infection, regardless of their illness.

Antibodies are substances produced by the immune system in response to an infection and eventually destroy an invasive pathogen.

How people recover from COVID-19 – a coronavirus that is closely related to the SARS bug – is not yet fully understood.

With many viral diseases, such as measles, the body develops immunity after being infected once, and this can last a lifetime.

Immunity means that the body remembers fighting a virus so well that it can destroy it before symptoms start if someone catches the virus.

Scientists are still not sure whether people will develop full immunity to SARS-Cov-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, after they have it.

But the overwhelming belief is that people won’t catch it twice, which gives hope of using antibody tests to determine who is immune.

The fact that so few people seem to get sick a second time seems to prove that people only get sick once. Tests on monkeys also supported the theory.

Fears have been expressed that people may be hit twice after reports of re-infection of patients in China, South Korea and Japan.

Some experts believe this is due to unreliable tests, while others claim that similar coronaviruses induce immunity for about three months.

The coronavirus appears to be a slow mutation and has only developed into a few strains since its first passage in humans.

On the other hand, the flu mutates so quickly that the human immune system cannot keep up, which means that people need a new vaccine every winter.

Tens of thousands of people in the UK have been hospitalized with the coronavirus since the epidemic began in February.

After starting its response to the epidemic by testing everyone with suspicious symptoms, the government almost completely stopped testing people outside of hospitals on March 12 – by that time, there had been 596 positive tests. and 10 deaths.

Since March 12, some 75,774 hospital patients have tested positive for the coronavirus and 10,602 have died, resulting in a death rate of 13.99%.

This does not reflect how deadly the virus is because hundreds of thousands, if not millions, of British people should have caught it and contracted only a mild illness, recovering at home as if they had the influenza.

Experts, including scientists from Imperial College London and government chief medical officer Professor Chris Whitty, expect the true death rate to be less than 1% when counted real of infected people.

While the vast majority of hospital patients can recover with just support to manage their symptoms or treatment for other infections, some require intensive care.

According to the National Critical Care Research and Audit Center (ICNARC), there was information available for 3883 COVID-19 critical care admissions until Thursday, April 9.

Of these patients, 871 died and 818 came out alive, which means that more than half (51.6%) of those whose hospital treatment had ended had not survived.

Most of them – 2,194 people – were still hospitalized at the time of the report.

Of those who needed ventilators – life-saving devices that pump air into the lungs when they stop working alone – only one in three survives their hospital stay.

Commenting on the high mortality rate for those in need of pulmonary assistance, Professor Duncan Young, an intensive care specialist at the University of Oxford, said: “The relative ineffectiveness of artificial ventilation may suggest that the COVID-19 causes a form of pneumonia that is particularly resistant to treatment.

“It is also possible that in some patients, COVID-19 is the cause of a multi-organ failure in which respiratory failure is the present problem but is not always the cause of death – but there is no data on this yet. “

It is difficult to calculate the exact death rate for hospitalized patients because neither the government nor the NHS England publish continuous data on the total number of hospitalizations.

As a result, some of the people counted in the test numbers may be NHS staff who were not actually hospital patients.

Other prominent figures, such as Secretary of Health Matt Hancock and Prince Charles, were also tested, but were not hospitalized.

There are currently about 19,000 people hospitalized with the coronavirus, Hancock said in yesterday’s daily government briefing.

And despite an increasing number of confirmed people infected with the deadly disease, the NHS is still coping and has more than 2,000 free intensive care beds.

Medical staff are furious at the delays in delivering personal protective equipment (PPE), and many say they have to work with inadequate supplies.

Matt Hancock sparked an argument Friday by telling doctors to be more restrained in the way they use equipment like masks, overalls, gloves and goggles, to make sure there are enough to go around.

Industry magazine Nursing Standard found that over two-thirds of NHS nurses said they did not have enough PPE.

One in three polls had used their own money to buy more and therefore felt protected, according to a survey, and one in ten had tried to be desperate.

Susan Masters of the Royal College of Nursing told Nursing Standard: “It is simply unacceptable that nurses are forced to spend their own money to buy even what would be considered the bare minimum to protect themselves.

“We always hear that millions of pieces of equipment are being delivered, but words are not enough. All nurses, no matter where they work, need to feel safe and need actions rather than insurance to be able to do their jobs. “

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