Coronavirus stops IVF for thousands of women: NPR

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Because of the coronavirus, the American Society for Reproductive Medicine has recommended the suspension of new treatments.

Morsa Images / Getty Images

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Morsa Images / Getty Images

Because of the coronavirus, the American Society for Reproductive Medicine has recommended the suspension of new treatments.

Morsa Images / Getty Images

Tens of thousands of women across the country trying to have a baby through fertility treatments are in limbo because of COVID-19: they had to postpone their appointment indefinitely due to recently issued coronavirus recommendations by the American Society for Reproductive Medicine. But now some fertility specialists and their patients are growing back.

Among them, Amy Schmidt Zook, whose bathroom cabinet in Fort Worth, Texas, houses a miniature pharmacy for drugs and medical equipment – syringes, needles, alcohol swabs, cotton swabs, drugs to stimulate her ovaries and follicles and to prevent premature ovulation.

Zook is 43 and wants to have a third child – she has a five-year-old son and a two-year-old daughter – but her doctors say her chances are slim. She and her husband therefore tried in vitro fertilization, or IVF, in which an egg and sperm are combined in a laboratory. If successful, the resulting embryo is transferred to a woman’s uterus.

But in mid-March, Zook’s fertility clinic told her that the American Society for Reproductive Medicine had recommended stopping new treatments, with no restart date, so she canceled her next appointments. Many other clinics across the country have done the same.

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