City worker who lost job due to coronavirus says she is “now poor” and dependent on food banks

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A city employee who lost her job due to a coronavirus says she is “now poor” with only £ 30 a month left after mortgage payments.

Under the pseudonym Alice, the woman revealed how she used to shop at Waitrose and Marks and Spencer, but was forced to look for food banks.

“I used to have more money to save and be able to shop at Waitrose, Marks and Spencer, and then suddenly go from that to gain nothing – you are now actually poor,” she said. told the BBC. Today’s show on Radio 4.

Volunteers are represented at the Paddington Food Bank in London as more and more people are forced to search for charities for bases due to the coronavirus crisis

Volunteers are represented at the Paddington Food Bank in London as more and more people are forced to search for charities for bases due to the coronavirus crisis

Before going to the food bank, she tried to ignore the hunger she felt by surviving two meals a day by listening to podcasts.

“I would have a bowl of porridge in the morning, then I would have a bowl of homemade soup for lunch, sometimes a few slices of toast,” she said. “It was a very, very poor diet – I was constantly hungry. “

She was terrified of going to get free food packages for fear of being seen.

Alice said that the mere thought of visiting the charity made her heart palpitations because she feared that the volunteers would wonder why someone who rings and looks good needs their vital services.

She was relieved when volunteers came to her aid without any questions, as food banks now expect previously wealthy people to surrender due to job losses linked to coronaviruses.

But she said she was still too afraid to tell friends and family that she was counting on charity or to ask for their help, which is why she uses a false name.

She said, “Admit it to friends and family? Well no. They know that I am not working but when they ask me if I am well, I answer that I am very well. Maybe I should be more honest and say “well actually, now you talk about it”. But you don’t do it.

It looks like:

  • The death toll in Britain has increased by 737 to more than 10,000, with an expert warning that it should be the highest in Europe;
  • It appeared that the Cabinet was divided over the end of the foreclosure, with growing concerns about the impact of school closings;
  • Michael Gove revealed that he had obtained a special exemption to have his daughter tested for the virus so that he could return to work;
  • The Archbishop of Canterbury asked that the dead be treated with dignity;
  • Ministers recognized that only 4,200 of the 300,000 small businesses had received loans;
  • The Royal College of Nursing told its members to refuse to treat patients if they did not have adequate protective clothing;
  • Some Britons flouted the lock rules and were seen enjoying the sun in the national parks;
  • Health Secretary Hancock said he had no update on the number of NHS personnel who died as a result of the 19 people he confirmed on Saturday;
  • The Queen stressed the importance of keeping the coronavirus locked, but insisted, “Easter is not canceled; indeed, we need Easter more than ever. ”

James Quale of the North Paddington Food Bank told the show that they are expanding beyond what they could have imagined and have increased home deliveries by thousands of percent in just two weeks.

He stressed that no one in need, whatever their profile, should feel worried about using the service.

In London, in the past fortnight, there have been 950,000 new requests for universal credit.

This week, the Guardian reported that as demand for food banks soared, individual donations declined.

As a result, many food banks find it impossible to replenish their stocks.

As more and more people turned to charities for help, major UK supermarkets were asked to reserve their supplies.

From the booklet to Lidl! The 27-year-old opera singer swaps the stage for stacking the shelves to make ends meet after the halls close for locking the coronavirus

By Vanessa Allen for the Daily Mail

She is used to more dramatic and less physical roles in front of a delighted audience.

But opera singer Lara Rebekah Harvey had to change scene for stacking shelves at Lidl.

The 27-year-old is one of thousands of performers left behind when the coronavirus crisis closed.

Lara Rebekah Harvey has performed across the country and was a soloist at the Royal Albert Hall in London at the 2016 Mountbatten Festival of Music

Lara Rebekah Harvey has performed across the country and was a soloist at the Royal Albert Hall in London at the 2016 Mountbatten Festival of Music

The mezzo soprano had also just landed a coveted role as a soloist with Opera Holland Park in west London.

But for the past three weeks, she has worked in Lidl stores and warehouses, earning around £ 9 an hour. “It couldn’t be more different,” she said.

“My first week was exhausting because it is very physical and there is a lot of heavy work. But I’m lucky to have a job.

“Some colleagues there know that I am an opera singer and I think they are quite surprised.

“But even if I appreciate it, I can’t wait to go back to the opera. “

Miss Harvey has performed across the country and was a soloist at the Royal Albert Hall in London at the 2016 Mountbatten Festival of Music.

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