China names coronavirus whistleblower doctor “martyr” after source disappears

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China has named one of the coronavirus whistleblowers “martyr”, according to official media, after its informer disappeared.

Li Wenliang, a 34-year-old doctor from Wuhan, died of a deadly COVID-19 infection in February after contracting it from a patient.

He was reprimanded by police for warning the public of an “SARS-like” illness weeks before Wuhan was taken into custody.

34-year-old Dr. Li Wenliang, who died of coronavirus last month after being punished for sounding the alarm about the epidemic, received the honorary title of

Dr. Li's name was buried in a list of 472 medical workers who were also honored for their contributions during the health crisis

34-year-old Dr. Li Wenliang, who died of coronavirus last month after being punished for raising the alarm about the epidemic, received the honorary title of “advanced person”

Dr. Ai Fen - who released the widespread coronavirus in Wuhan - has disappeared, raising concerns about his detention, reports say. Dr Ai reportedly arrested

Dr. Ai Fen – who released the widespread coronavirus in Wuhan – has disappeared, raising concerns about his detention, reports say. Dr Ai reportedly arrested

Who is Dr Ai Fen?

It was recently revealed that Dr. Li had raised the alarm for a potential epidemic after receiving a test message from his colleague Dr. Ai.

She was presented as “the one who gave the whistles to the whistleblowers”.

Dr. Ai, who works in the emergency room, criticized the management of Wuhan Central Hospital for rejecting the first warnings of the coronavirus in an interview published last month by a Chinese magazine – before it was quickly censored.

She admitted that she “regretted not having spoken more” after four of her colleagues, including Dr. Li, contracted the virus and died fighting the epidemic.

She also said that she was “unprecedented and extremely harshly reprimanded” by officials at Wuhan Central Hospital after sending the text.

The news comes when Dr. Li’s colleague Ai Fen, who informed him of the virus, is believed to have disappeared, raising fears that she may have been arrested for speaking out.

People who claim to know Dr. Ai have alleged on Chinese social media that she lives and works as usual while calling the report of an Australian channel false.

Authorities did not respond to the report.

The late Dr. Li was officially classified as a “martyr” by local authorities who praised his bravery, dedication and quick reaction.

His name is among a total of 14 medical workers in Hubei Province who received the title after contracting the contagion at work, and then died of it, reported the public television channel CCTV via his social media account.

Citing Hubei officials, a CCTV station said, “They did not respect their personal safety, stayed on the front lines, ran against the clock in fighting demon disease and protect life and safety. people day and night.

‘Greet! Farewell to heroes!

Dr. Li was reprimanded by the police for sharing the information and was forced to sign a statement (photo) agreeing to stop doing

He was reprimanded by the police after being warned on social media of

Dr. Li was reprimanded by the police for sharing the information and was forced to sign a statement (left) agreeing to refrain from carrying out “actions contrary to the law”. His death caused an uproar in China

Woman wearing facial mask walks past poster of late Li Wenliang, Chinese coronavirus doctor at Wuhan hospital in Prague, Czech Republic, March 27

Woman wearing facial mask walks past poster of late Li Wenliang, Chinese coronavirus doctor at Wuhan hospital in Prague, Czech Republic, March 27

The late winners include Liu Zhiming, 51, a former director of Wuhan Wuchang Hospital who died of the infection on February 18 after being infected at work.

Two of Dr. Li’s colleagues, Jiang Xueqing, 56, and Mei Zhongming, 57, were also on the list.

More than 3,000 medical workers contracted the coronavirus while treating patients, and at least 26 of them died, according to figures released by Chinese media.

Dr. Jiang Xueqing, 56, specializes in the treatment of diseases of the mammary gland and the thyroid gland. He died on March 1

Dr. Mei Zhongming, 57, worked in the same department as Dr. Li Wenliang. He died on March 3

Dr. Jiang Xueqing (left) and Dr. Mei Zhongming (right), who also worked for Wuhan Central Hospital, lost their lives due to this deadly disease. Dr. Jiang, 56, specialized in the treatment of diseases of the mammary gland and thyroid gland while Dr. Mei, 57, worked with Dr. Li Wenliang

Dr. Li, an ophthalmologist, was pronounced dead in the early hours of February 7 after being tested positive on January 31.

The news of his death was originally reported by state media Global Times before being quickly retracted. His workplace, Wuhan Central Hospital, then claimed that doctors were still trying to save him.

His death and the contradictory reports about it sparked an uproar on Chinese social networks, the public accusing the authorities of trying to hide the truth and control freedom of expression.

More than 3,000 medical workers contracted the coronavirus while treating patients, and at least 26 of them died, according to figures released by Chinese media. Photo shows medical workers dressed in hazardous materials transferring patient to Wuhan hospital on February 6

More than 3,000 medical workers contracted the coronavirus while treating patients, and at least 26 of them died, according to figures released by Chinese media. Photo shows medical workers dressed in hazardous materials transferring patient to Wuhan hospital on February 6

“He was not allowed to speak. He was not even allowed to die, “one person wrote on the popular messaging app WeChat as she commented on a circulating notice that apparently asked all media to remove coverage of Dr. Li Wenliang’s death.

“Dr. Li Wenliang was not allowed to” die “until after most people went to bed,” another Twitter user, like Weibo, condemned, saying that Dr. Li’s hospital quickly denied the relevant information and declared the doctor’s death in the wee hours today.

The deceased doctor whistled for the coronavirus epidemic in late December, about three weeks before authorities engaged Wuhan to stop the spread of the contagion.

Photo shows medical staff disinfecting a stretcher at Wuhan Central Hospital in Wuhan

This photo taken on April 1 shows medical workers disinfecting a stretcher at Wuhan Central Hospital in Wuhan. Li Wenliang was a doctor in the hospital before he died of COVID-19

He was reprimanded by the police for sharing the information and was forced to sign a declaration agreeing to refrain from committing “actions contrary to the law”.

An investigation by the Chinese government revealed last month that the police had acted “inappropriately” in handling the case.

The police have since apologized to the public and pardoned Dr. Li.

Life in Wuhan, the former center of the coronavirus pandemic, is slowly returning to normal. Photo shows a man wearing a face mask mounted on a scooter outside of Wuhan University today

Life in Wuhan, the former center of the coronavirus pandemic, is slowly returning to normal. Photo shows a man wearing a face mask mounted on a scooter outside of Wuhan University today

It was recently revealed that Dr. Li had raised the alarm for a potential epidemic after receiving a test message from his colleague Dr. Ai, who was billed as “the whistleblower.”

Dr. Ai, who works in the emergency room, criticized the management of Wuhan Central Hospital for rejecting the first warnings of the coronavirus in an interview published last month by a Chinese magazine – before it was quickly censored.

She admitted that she “regretted not having spoken more” after four of her colleagues, including Dr. Li, contracted the virus and died fighting the epidemic.

She also said that she was “unprecedented and extremely harshly reprimanded” by officials at Wuhan Central Hospital after sending the text.

She has not been seen since her interview with Renwu Magazine on March 10, 60 Minutes Australia reported.

On March 29, after Dr. Ai disappeared, a post on his Twitter account, Weibo, shared a photo with the caption: `` A river. A bridge. A road. A clock chime '

On March 29, after Dr. Ai disappeared, a post on his Twitter account, Weibo, shared a photo with the caption: “A river. A bridge. A road. A clock chime ‘

After the survey was released, a post in the doctor’s Weibo account – a social networking platform similar to Twitter – shared a photo with the caption: “A river. A bridge. A road. A clock chime ‘.

The post was tagged with a phrase “you are the sweetest and most bitter,” indicating her love and hate relationship with her hometown.

However, some comments under the mysterious post suggested that Dr. Ai lived and worked normally.

One response said, “Dr. Ai is fine and living normally. I come from Wuhan and I know his family.

His rumored disappearance comes after criticism was directed at the Chinese government for lying and concealing key information at virtually every stage of its response to the coronaviruses – charges that Beijing has denied and condemned.

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