Britons RETURN strict lock-in rules despite fear that they will harm Britain’s economy for years – Poll

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The vast majority of Britons support the lockdown rules used to fight coronavirus but are increasingly worried about crippling the economy, according to a poll.

The country supports Boris Johnson’s decision to close the country on March 23, but is afraid of what it could cost.

It is understood that Foreign Minister Dominic Raab will announce on Thursday that the restrictions will last until at least May 7.

The devastating virus ravaged Britain, killing 11,329 and infecting 88,621.

Up to 19% of workers, mostly young people, have lost their jobs or been forced to earn less because of the coronavirus crisis

Up to 19% of workers, mostly young people, have lost their jobs or have been forced to earn lower wages due to the coronavirus crisis

The YouGov poll for the Telegraph found that 48% of the country supports government foreclosure measures.

An impressive 92% said they agreed, “I will likely follow government advice even if I disagree with it or find it unnecessary.” “

Yet 44% believe that the Prime Minister could have put in place tighter controls as daily updates from people who break the rules continue to emerge.

Up to 19% of workers, most of them younger, have lost their jobs or have been forced to earn lower wages.

The survey, which interviewed more than 2,000 Britons on Sunday, found that 84% of those surveyed expected financial problems due to the foreclosure.

Meanwhile, a higher figure reported feeling progressively lonely and unhappy as the mental health impact of the restrictions began to bite.

YouGov’s director of political research, Chris Curtis, said the results were proving difficult for policymakers because they showed people the deadlock but fear for the economy.

Meanwhile, higher numbers reported feeling progressively lonely and unhappy as the mental health impact of the restrictions began to bite

Meanwhile, higher numbers reported feeling progressively lonely and unhappy as the mental health impact of the restrictions began to bite

Germany faces similar challenges, with polls showing that the country is divided on easing restrictions.

Another YouGov survey yesterday found that 44% were in favor of extending social distancing beyond April 19.

But 32% are in favor of their relaxation and 8% want their total elimination. Twelve percent want to tighten them further.

Professor Linda Bauld of the University of Edinburgh said strong support from the British public for sticking to the lockdowns “will not last”.

She said the government must find a way to tell the nation how it will be relaxed.

It comes as Mr. Raab said the figures indicate that the UK is “starting to win this fight” against the virus, but warned that it “has not yet gone beyond the top.”

It’s been three weeks since the lockdown started and the public is preparing for more of the same.

Support for measures remains high, compliance is generally good, and concerns about the virus are in the forefront of people’s minds, said Professor Bauld.

She warned, “But it won’t last. The social, economic and health effects of foreclosure are piling up.

“There will be a tipping point when the cost of the current restrictions outweighs the benefits. “

Without an official indication of the duration of the foreclosure, Professor Bauld said: “As soon as possible, the government must share the options available to the public and be transparent about the costs and benefits of each, rather than continually evading them. questions about it. , as is currently the case. “

This information on what the next steps in the fight against the coronavirus might involve would help people plan their lives while providing some assurance, she insists.

This would be “particularly important for our young people who experience enormous uncertainty about short-term education and employment options, as well as for those who suffer the most adverse consequences of the restrictions.”

Raab told the Downing Street daily press conference that this week the Scientific Emergency Advisory Group (Sage) will examine the evidence for the effectiveness of social distancing measures.

University of Edinburgh professor Linda Bauld says UK public support for the lockdown will not last

University of Edinburgh professor Linda Bauld says UK public support for the lockdown will not last

He said: “We do not expect to make any changes to the measures currently in place at this stage and we will not do so until we are as confident, as confident as we can be, that such changes can be carried out safely. ”

Professor Rowland Kao of the University of Edinburgh also noted that “considerable uncertainty” remains regarding the number of people who have never been exposed to Covid-19 and therefore have no immunity, compared to those who may not have had noticeable symptoms, but may have developed immunity.

This could be a factor in plans to reduce foreclosure restrictions, because if the number without immunity is high, relaxing the controls could put them at higher risk and lead to an increase in the number of cases.

Any change “should be done gradually, (and) only initially considering the lowest risk and most vital activities,” he suggested, adding that it should be followed by a period of continuous monitoring without further reduction of controls.

“This is how the impact of the most recent changes can be assessed.

Stating that future decisions should only be made when the pandemic declines, he said, “At the bare minimum, it would take several weeks between decision points, and possibly longer, with some possibility that the restrictions could be again increased based on available evidence. “

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